Synonyms containing good eggs

We've found 8,581 synonyms:

Good

Good

good, adj. having qualities, whether physical or moral, desirable or suitable to the end proposed: promoting success, welfare, or happiness: virtuous: pious: kind: benevolent: proper: fit: competent: satisfactory: sufficient: valid: sound: serviceable: beneficial: real: serious, as in 'good earnest:' not small, considerable, as in 'good deal:' full, complete, as in 'good measure:' unblemished, honourable, as in 'good name:'—comp. bett′er; superl. best.—n. that which promotes happiness, success, &c.—opp. to Evil: prosperity: welfare: advantage, temporal or spiritual: moral qualities: virtue: (B.) possessions: (pl.) household furniture: movable property: merchandise (in composition, the equivalent of U.S. freight).—interj. well! right!—adv. well.—ns. Good′-breed′ing, polite manners formed by a good breeding or education; Good′-broth′er (Scot.), a brother-in-law.—n. or interj. Good′-bye, contracted from 'God be with you:' farewell, a form of address at parting.—adj. Good′-condi′tioned, being in a good state.—ns. or interjs. Good′-day, a common salutation, a contraction of 'I wish you a good day;' Good′-den, a corruption of good-e'en; Good′-e'en, Good′-ēv′en, Good′-ēve′ning, a salutation on meeting or parting in the evening.—adj. Good′-faced (Shak.), having a handsome face.—ns. Good′-fell′ow, a jolly or boon companion: a reveller; Good′-fell′owship, merry or pleasant company: conviviality.—n.pl. Good′-folk, a euphemism for the fairies, of whom it is best to speak respectfully.—adj. Good′-for-noth′ing, worthless, useless.—n. an idle person.—ns. Good′-Frī′day, a fast in memory of our Lord's crucifixion, held on the Friday of Passion-week; Good′-hū′mour, a cheerful temper, from the old idea that temper depended on the humours of the body.—adj. Good′-hū′moured.—adv. Good′-hū′mouredly.—n. Good′iness, weak, priggish, or canting goodness.—adj. Good′ish, pretty good, of fair quality or quantity.—interj. Good′-lack, an expression of surprise or pity—a variation of 'Good Lord,' under the influence of alack.—n. Good′liness.—adv. Good′ly (Spens.), excellently, kindly.—adj. good-like: good-looking: fine: excellent:—comp. Good′lier; superl. Good′liest.—ns. Good′lyhead (Spens.), goodness; Good′lyhood, grace; Goodman′ (B.), the man or master of the house—the correlative to it is — Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Egg

Egg

eg, n. an oval body laid by birds and certain other animals, from which their young are produced: anything shaped like an egg.—ns. Egg′-app′le, or plant, the brinjal or aubergine, an East Indian annual with egg-shaped fruit; Egg′-bird, a sooty tern; Egg′-cō′sy, a covering put over boiled eggs to keep in the heat after being taken from the pot: Egg′-cup, a cup for holding an egg at table; Egg′er, Egg′ler, one who collects eggs; Egg′ery, a place where eggs are laid; Egg′-flip, a hot drink made of ale, with eggs, sugar, spice, &c.; Egg′-glass, a small sand-glass for regulating the boiling of eggs; Egg′-nog, a drink compounded of eggs and hot beer, spirits, &c.; Egg′-shell, the shell or calcareous substance which covers the eggs of birds; Egg′-slice, a kitchen utensil for lifting fried eggs out of a pan; Egg′-spoon, a small spoon used in eating eggs from the shell.—A bad egg (coll.), a worthless person; Put all one's eggs into one basket, to risk all on one enterprise; Take eggs for money, to be put off with mere promises of payment; Teach your grandmother to suck eggs, spoken contemptuously to one who would teach those older and wiser than himself; Tread upon eggs, to walk warily, to steer one's way carefully in a delicate situation. [A.S. æg; cf. Ice. egg, Ger. ei, perh. L. ovum, Gr. ōon.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Good citizenship

Good citizenship

'Good citizenship' is when one properly fulfills their role as a citizen. There are many opinions as to what constitutes a good citizen. Theodore Roosevelt said, "The first requisite of a good citizen in this Republic of ours is that he shall be able and willing to pull his weight." Education is sometimes viewed as a prerequisite to good citizenship, in that it helps citizens make good decisions and deal with demagogues who would delude them. Roger Soder writes that in a democracy, where the demands of good citizenship are placed upon all, "only the common schools can provide to all the education that all need." Science literacy is also frequently touted as a key to good citizenship. Good citizenship is sometimes viewed as requiring both intellectual skills (such as critical thinking) and participatory skills (such as deliberating civilly, monitoring the government, building coalitions, managing conflict peacefully and fairly, and petitioning, speaking or testifying before public bodies).Henry David Thoreau wrote that men who serve the state making "no free exercise whatever of the judgment or of the moral sense...are commonly esteemed good citizens." Orit Ichilov notes that children "tend to perceive the government in the image of an ideal father that is benevolent and protective. At this stage, the good citizen is characterized as one who, through his behavior, proves himself one worthy of the love and protection of the government rather than one possessing certain political obligations and rights." Through their early school years, children usually continue to think in apolitical terms of their citizenship, expressing loyalty by their desire to remain in their country due to an attachment to its beauty, wildlife, and good people. By age twelve or thirteen, they begin referring more to political qualities, such as the nature and values of the regime. High school seniors define the good citizen primarily in political terms. Some students define good citizenship in terms of standing up for what one believes in. Joel Westheimer identifies the personally responsible citizen (who acts responsibly in his community, e.g. by donating blood), the participatory citizen (who is an active member of community organizations and/or improvement efforts) and the justice-oriented citizen (who critically assesses social, political, and economic structures to see beyond surface causes) as three different types of "good citizen."Sometimes incentives prevail over desires to be a good citizen. For example, many people will avoid coming forth as witnesses in court cases because they do not want to deal with the inconvenience and red tape. Aristotle makes a distinction between the good citizen and the good man, writing, "...there cannot be a single absolute excellence of the good citizen. But the good man is so called in virtue of a single absolute excellence. It is thus clear that it is possible to be a good citizen without possessing the excellence which is the quality of a good man." Specifically, in his view, the good citizen is measured in relation to ruling and being ruled, the good man only in ruling. Some of the ambiguity is likely due to more than one Greek word being translated "good."Many organizations attempt to promote "good citizenship." For example, the Boy Scouts of America published Scouting for Boys: A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship, and the Ontario Medal for Good Citizenship is given to those who are deemed to have made outstanding contributions to the well being of their communities without expectation of remuneration or reward. Another non-profit organization, Good Citizen, has a mission to teach Americans how to be effective citizens and focuses on 100 citizen actions.

— Wikipedia

Complementary good

Complementary good

In economics, a complementary good or complement is a good with a negative cross elasticity of demand, in contrast to a substitute good. This means a good's demand is increased when the price of another good is decreased. Conversely, the demand for a good is decreased when the price of another good is increased. If goods A and B are complements, an increase in the price of A will result in a leftward movement along the demand curve of A and cause the demand curve for B to shift in; less of each good will be demanded. A decrease in the price of A will result in a rightward movement along the demand curve of A and cause the demand curve B to shift outward; more of each good will be demanded. Basically this means that since the demand of one good is linked to the demand for another good, if a higher quantity is demanded of one good, a higher quantity will also be demanded of the other, and if a lower quantity is demanded of one good, a lower quantity will be demanded of the other. When two goods are complements, they experience joint demand. For example, the demand for razor blades may depend upon the number of razors in use; this is why razors have sometimes been sold as loss leaders, to increase demand for the associated blades.All goods can be substitutes for one another, but the same is not true for complements, because this would violate an inequality. If x and y are rough complements in an everyday sense, then we would expect a consumer to be willing to pay more for each marginal unit of good x as she accumulates more y. The opposite is true for substitutes: we would expect the consumer to be willing to pay less for each marginal unit of good z as she accumulates more of good y. Recent work in food consumption has elucidated the psychological processes by which the consumption of one good (e.g., cola) stimulates demand for its complements (e.g., a cheeseburger, pizza, etc.). Consumption of a food or beverage activates a goal to consume its complements: foods that consumers believe would produce super-additive utility (i.e., would taste better together). Eating peanut-butter covered crackers, for instance, increases the consumption of grape-jelly covered crackers more than eating plain crackers. Drinking cola increases consumers' willingness to pay for a voucher for a cheeseburger. This effect appears to be contingent on consumers' perceptions of what foods are complements rather than their sensory properties.

— Wikipedia

Good Eggs

Good Eggs

Good Eggs is driven by their mission to grow and sustain local food systems worldwide. Good Eggs connects you to local farmers and foodmakers. You shop for exactly what you want, and we deliver it all to your door.We're creating marketplaces in cities and regions around the world. We hold ourselves and our producers to the highest standards of honesty, transparency and sustainability, delivering food made with integrity.We’re currently operating our full marketplace in the San Francisco Bay Area as we expand to cities nationwide. Our teams in Brooklyn, Los Angeles and New Orleans are currently piloting marketplaces, getting ready for full launches in the coming months. Good Eggs was founded by Rob Spiro & Alon Salant.

— CrunchBase

Substitute good

Substitute good

In economics, one way two or more goods are classified is by examining the relationship of the demand schedules when the price of one good changes. This relationship between demand schedules leads to classification of goods as either substitutes or complements. Substitute goods are goods which, as a result of changed conditions, may replace each other in use. A substitute good, in contrast to a complementary good, is a good with a positive cross elasticity of demand. This means a good's demand is increased when the price of another good is increased. Conversely, the demand for a good is decreased when the price of another good is decreased. If goods A and B are substitutes, an increase in the price of A will result in a leftward movement along the demand curve of A and cause the demand curve for B to shift out. A decrease in the price of A will result in a rightward movement along the demand curve of A and cause the demand curve for B to shift in. Examples of substitute goods include margarine and butter, tea and coffee. Substitute goods not only occur on the consumer side of the market but also the producer side. Substitutable producer goods would include: petroleum and natural gas. The degree to which a good has a perfect substitute depends on how specifically the good is defined. Take for example, the demand for Rice Krispies cereal, which is a very narrowly defined good as compared to the demand for cereal generally. The fact that one good is substitutable for another has immediate economic consequences: insofar as one good can be substituted for another, the demands for the two kinds of good will be bound together by the fact that customers can trade off one good for the other if it becomes advantageous to do so.

— Freebase

Scrambled eggs

Scrambled eggs

Scrambled eggs is a dish made from whites and yolks of eggs. Eggs are put into a hot pot or pan and stirred frequently, forming curds as they coagulate. In the recipe beaten eggs are poured into a hot greased pan and coagulate almost immediately. The heat is turned down to low and the eggs are constantly stirred as they cook. The pan and the stirring implement, if kept in constant motion, create small and soft curds of egg. Once the liquid has mostly set, additional ingredients such as ham, herbs, cheese or cream may be folded in over low heat, just until incorporated. The eggs should be slightly undercooked when removed from heat, since the eggs will continue to set. If this technique is followed, the eggs should be moist in texture with a creamy consistency. If any liquid is seeping from the eggs, this is a sign of overcooking or adding under cooked high-moisture vegetables.

— Freebase

Ovorubin

Ovorubin

Ovorubin (PcOvo or PcPV1) is the most abundant perivitellin (>60 % total protein) of the perivitelline fluid from Pomacea canaliculata snail eggs. This glyco-lipo-caroteno protein complex is a approx. 300 kDa multimer of a combination of multiple copies of six different ~30 kDa subunits. Together with the other perivitellins from Pomacea canaliculata eggs, ovorubin serves a nutrient source for developing embryos, notably to the intermediate and late stages. Moreover, after hatching, the protein is still detected in the lumen of the digestive gland ready to be endocytosed, therefore, acting as a nutrient source for the newly hatched snail. Ovorubin contains carbohydrates and carotenoid pigments as main prosthetic groups, which are related to many physiological roles on Pomacea aerial egg-laying strategy. Given that carbohydrates tend to retain water, the high glycosylation of ovorubin (~17 % w/w) was proposed as an embryo defense against water loss. The carotenoid pigments stabilized by ovorubin also provide the eggs of antioxidant and photoprotective capacities, crucial roles to cope with the harsh conditions of the aerial environment. The presence of carotenoid pigments is also responsible for the brightly reddish coloration of Ovorubin, and therefore snail eggs, which was related to a warning coloration (aposematism) advertising predators about the presence of deterrents. In fact, field evidence of egg unpalatability is provided by the fact that most animals foraging in habitats where the apple snails live ignore these eggs. Like most other studied perivitellins from Pomacea snails, ovorubin is highly stable in a wide range of pH values and withstands gastrointestinal digestion, characteristics associated with an antinutritive defense system that deters predation by lowering the nutritional value of the eggs.

— Wikipedia

Good Technology

Good Technology

Good Technology provides multi-platform enterprise mobility, security and management software. Product offerings include those Good for Enterprise, Good for Government, Good for OEM Device Manufacturers/Carriers and Good Dynamics, the first mobile application platform that empowers enterprise developers and ISVs to create secure mobile applications.The company started out building an MP3 attachment to the Handspring Visor under the brand of SpringThings. It later offered its own device to provide wireless email access to corporate users.Established in 1996 and headquartered in RedwSunnyvale, California, Good Technology is backed by Oak Investment Partners, Draper Fisher Jurvetson, Meritech Capital Partners, DFJ ePlanet Ventures, DFJ Growth Fund, Rustic Canyon Ventures, Allegis Capital, GKM and Blueprint Ventures.Good mobile solutions currently operate on over 200 carriers. Major organizations, including 40 of the Fortune 100, currently using Good technology include leaders in financial services, healthcare, retail, telecommunications, manufacturing, legal, and government agencies.Good has partnerships with industry leaders including LG, HTC, Microsoft, Nokia, Palm, Symbian and leading systems integrators who combine to support industry’s broadest range of mobile devices.Award-winning technology. A few of the awards Good Technology has garnered in recent years: Leader, 2011 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Mobile Device Management Software Winner, 2011 SIIA CODiE Award Winner, SC Magazine EMEA Finalist, SC Magazine US Winner, Wireless LTE Visionary Award Winner, Product Innovation Award, Network Products Guide Winner, CTIA Emerging Technology (E-Tech) Award Top 100 Global Companies, Red Herring Visto acquired Good Technology in 2009 and renamed itself as the acquired company.

— CrunchBase

Well

Well

wel, adj. good in condition: fortunate: comfortable: in health.—n. (Spens.) good health, fortune.—adv. in a proper manner: rightly: thoroughly: favourably: conveniently: to a considerable extent: conscientiously: so be it (as a sign of assent).—adjs. Well′-acquaint′ed, having intimate personal knowledge; Well′-advised′, prudent.—adv. Well′-anear′ (Shak.), very soon.—adj. Well′-appoint′ed, in good trim.—n. Well′-appoint′edness′.—adjs. Well′-bal′anced, properly adjusted; Well′-behāved′, becoming in manner.—n. Well′-bē′ing, state of being well, welfare.—adjs. Well′-beloved′, very dear; Well′-beseem′ing, properly becoming; Well′-beseen′ (Spens.), showy in appearance; Well′-born, born of a good or respectable family: not of mean birth; Well′-breathed, strong of lung; Well′-bred, educated to polished manners: of good stock; Well′-condi′tioned, in a desirable condition; Well′-conduct′ed, properly led: acting properly; Well′-disposed′, favourable.—ns. Well′-do′er, a benefactor; Well′-do′ing, a doing of what is right or good.—adjs. Well′-earned, thoroughly deserved; Well′-ed′ucated, having a good education; Well′-famed, famous; Well-fā′voured, good-looking; Well′-fed, fat; Well′-found, commendable; Well′-found′ed, highly probable; Well′-graced, popular; Well′-ground′ed, very likely; Well′-informed′, full of varied information; Well′-inten′tioned, of upright intentions or purpose; Well′-judged, correctly calculated; Well′-knit, strongly framed; Well′-known, fully known: celebrated: notorious; Well′-lik′ing (Shak.), in good condition: clever, smart; Well′-look′ing, good-looking; Well′-mann′ered, polite: obedient; Well′-marked, obvious, decided; Well′-mean′ing, well-intentioned; Well′-meant, rightly intended; Well′-mind′ed, favourably inclined.—adv. Well′-nigh, nearly: almost.—adjs. Well′-or′dered, correctly governed; Well′-pleas′ing, acceptable; Well′-plight′ed (Spens.), well folded; Well′-propor′tioned

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Egg

Egg

In zoology, an egg is an organic vessel in which an embryo first begins to develop. In most birds, reptiles, insects, molluscs, fish, and monotremes, an egg is the zygote, resulting from fertilization of the ovum, which is expelled from the body and permitted to develop outside the body until the developing embryo can survive on its own. The term "egg" is used differently outside the animal kingdom, for an egg cell. Reproductive structures similar to the egg in other kingdoms are termed spores, or seeds. Oviparous animals are animals that lay eggs, with little or no other development within the mother. The study or collecting of eggs, particularly bird eggs, is called oology. Reptile eggs, bird eggs, and monotreme eggs, which are laid out of water, are surrounded by a protective shell, either flexible or inflexible. The special membranes that support these eggs are traits of all amniotes, including mammals. Eggs laid on land or in nests are usually kept within a favourable temperature range while the embryo grows. When the embryo is adequately developed it breaks out of the egg's shell. This breaking out is known as hatching. Baby animals which have just hatched are hatchlings, though standard names for babies of particular species continue to apply, such as chick for a baby chicken. Some embryos have a temporary egg tooth with which to crack, pip, or break the eggshell or covering.

— Freebase

Pickled egg

Pickled egg

Pickled eggs are typically hard boiled eggs that are cured in vinegar or brine. This was originally done like many foods as a way to preserve the food so that it could be eaten months later; pickled eggs have since become a favorite among many as a snack or hors d'œuvre popular in pubs, bars and taverns, and around the world in places where beer is served. After the eggs are hard boiled, the shell is removed and they are submerged in a solution of vinegar, salt, spices, and other seasonings. Recipes vary from the traditional brine solution used for pickles to other solutions which can impart a sweet or spicy taste. The final taste is largely determined by the pickling solution. The eggs are left in this solution from one day to several months. Prolonged exposure to the pickling solution may result in a rubbery texture. Care should be taken to prepare the eggs properly to avoid food poisoning. A variant in Pennsylvania Dutch country is the pickled red beet egg where whole beets, onions, vinegar, sugar, salt, cloves, and a cinnamon stick are used as the brine. The eggs take on a pink color due to the beets and have pleasant sweet and sour taste. Pickled red beet eggs are a common food at picnics and pot-lucks in the Pennsylvania Dutch country.

— Freebase

Public good

Public good

In economics, a public good is a good that is both non-excludable and non-rivalrous in that individuals cannot be excluded from use or could be enjoyed without paying for it, and where use by one individual does not reduce availability to others or the goods can be effectively consumed simultaneously by more than one person. This is in contrast to a common good such as wild fish stocks in the ocean, which is non-excludable but is rivalrous to a certain degree, as if too many fish are harvested, the stocks will be depleted. Public goods include knowledge, official statistics, national security, common language(s), flood control systems, lighthouses, and street lighting. Public goods that are available everywhere are sometimes referred to as global public goods. Examples of public good knowledge is men's, women's and youth health awareness, environmental issues, maintaining biodiversity, sharing and interpreting contemporary history with a cultural lexicon, particularly about protected cultural heritage sites and monuments, popular and entertaining tourist attractions, libraries and universities. Many public goods may at times be subject to excessive use resulting in negative externalities affecting all users; for example air pollution and traffic congestion. Public goods problems are often closely related to the "free-rider" problem, in which people not paying for the good may continue to access it. Thus, the good may be under-produced, overused or degraded. Public goods may also become subject to restrictions on access and may then be considered to be club goods; exclusion mechanisms include toll roads, congestion pricing, and pay television with an encoded signal that can be decrypted only by paid subscribers. There is a good deal of debate and literature on how to measure the significance of public goods problems in an economy, and to identify the best remedies. There is an important conceptual difference between the sense of "a" public good, or public "goods" in economics, and the more generalized idea of "the public good" (or common good, or public interest), "a shorthand signal for shared benefit at a societal level".In a non-economic sense, the term is often used to describe something that is useful for the public generally, such as education, although this is not a "public good" in the economic sense. However, services like education exhibit jointness of supply, i.e. the situation in which the cost of supplying a good to many users is the same, or nearly the same, as supplying it to one user. Public goods also exhibit jointness of supply, albeit with no diminishment of the benefits with increased consumption.

— Wikipedia

eggs

eggs

These nutritious articles of food might be used longer at sea than is usual. The shell of the egg abounds with small pores, through which the aqueous part of the albumen constantly exhales, and the egg in consequence daily becomes lighter, and approaches its decomposition. Reaumur varnished them all over, and thus preserved eggs fresh for two years; then carefully removing the varnish, he found that such eggs were still capable of producing chickens. Some employ, with the same intention, lard or other fatty substance for closing the pores, and others simply immerse the egg for an instant in boiling water, by which its albumen is in part coagulated, and the power of exhalation thereby checked. Eggs packed in lime-water suffered to drain, have after three years' absence in the West Indies been found good; this does not destroy vitality.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

Egging

Egging

Egging refers to the act of throwing eggs at houses, cars, or people. Egging is a criminal offence in most areas. The eggs are usually raw, but are sometimes hard-boiled or rotten. Eggs are capable of causing damage when thrown at property and egging is often considered vandalism for this reason. Eggs can break windows and, when thrown at cars, can dent a body panel or chip paint where the shell breaks, leaving an oval outline. Additionally, egg whites can degrade certain types of vehicle and house paint. Whether or not the egg damages the surface beneath it, dried egg can be surprisingly difficult to remove. Vigorous removal attempts with scrapers or abrasives can, themselves, damage the egged surface. A nurse was blinded in one eye when an egg was thrown at her from a passing car in March 2008 in Dublin. A boy in Long Island also lost sight in one eye after teens from a local high school threw eggs out of a passing car on Halloween 2005. Victims of egging may be entitled to compensation commensurate with the cost of repairs to mend damaged property due to the egging, common charges involved with eggings are damage to property, vandalism and may be liable to nuisance. In some more serious cases where injuries due to egging is presented, perpetrators may be charged with assault and fined. Egging is sometimes associated with certain events and holidays. In parts of England and the United States October 30 is referred to as "Mischief Night," where mischievous teens rub soap bars on car windows, throw eggs at houses, adorn trees with toilet paper, and run away after ringing doorbells. In some areas of Queens, New York, Cabbage Night involved throwing rotten fruit at various neighbors, cars, and buses. Pre-teens and teens would fill eggs with Neet and Nair and throw them at unsuspecting individuals.

— Freebase

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A word similar to "limited"
  • A. general
  • B. unqualified
  • C. circumscribed
  • D. immoderate