Synonyms containing googly eyes

We've found 2,186 synonyms:

Googly eyes

Googly eyes

Googly eyes or jiggly eyes are small plastic craft supplies used to imitate eyeballs. Googly eyes traditionally are composed of a clear, hard-plastic shell, with a smaller, black plastic disk trapped within. The plastic shells come in a variety of sizes ranging from ³⁄16 inches to over 3 inches diameter. The inner black disk is allowed to move freely within the larger clear plastic shell, which makes the eyes appear to move. These disks come in a variety of colors including pink, blue, yellow, red and green. Googly eyes are used for a variety of arts and crafts projects including pipe cleaner farm animals, silly sock puppets, and other creations. Googly eyes may also be attached to inanimate objects in order to give the objects a "silly" or "cute" appearance. This use often personifies the objects for a humorous effect.

— Freebase

Eye

Eye

ī, n. the organ of sight or vision, more correctly the globe or movable part of it: the power of seeing: sight: regard: aim: keenness of perception: anything resembling an eye, as the hole of a needle, loop or ring for a hook, &c.: the seed-bud of a potato: (pl.) the foremost part of a ship's bows, the hawse-holes.—v.t. to look on: to observe narrowly.—v.i. (Shak.) to appear:—pr.p. ey′ing or eye′ing; pa.p. eyed (īd).—ns. Eye′-ball, the ball, globe, or apple of the eye; Eye′-beam, a glance of the eye; Eye′bright, a beautiful little plant of the genus Euphrasia, formerly used as a remedy for diseases of the eye (see Euphrasy); Eye′brow, the hairy arch above the eye.—v.t. to provide with artificial eyebrows.—adj. Eye′browless, without eyebrows.—p.adj. Eyed, having eyes: spotted as if with eyes.—ns. Eye′-drop (Shak.), a tear; Eye′-flap, a blinder on a horse's bridle; Eye′-glance, a quick look; Eye′glass, a glass to assist the sight, esp. such as stick on the nose by means of a spring: the eye-piece of a telescope and like instrument: (Shak.) the lens of the eye; Eye′lash, the line of hairs that edges the eyelid.—adj. Eye′less, without eyes or sight: deprived of eyes: blind.—ns. Eye′let, Eye′let-hole, a small eye or hole to receive a lace or cord, as in garments, sails, &c.: a small hole for seeing through: a little eye.—v.i. to make eyelets.—ns. Eye′liad, obsolete form of œillade; Eye′lid, the lid or cover of the eye: the portion of movable skin by means of which the eye is opened or closed at pleasure; Eye′-ō′pener, something that opens the eyes literally or figuratively, a startling story: a drink, esp. in the morning; Eye′-piece, the lens or combination of lenses at the eye-end of a telescope; Eye′-pit, the socket of the eye; Eye′-salve, salve or ointment for the eyes; Eye′-serv′ant, a servant who does his duty only when under the eye of his master; Eye′-serv′ice, service performed only under the eye or inspection of an employer: formal worship; Eye′-shot, the reach or range of sight of the eye: a glance; Eye′sight, power of seeing: view: observation; Eye′sore, anything that is offensive to the eye or otherwise; Eye′-splice, a kind of eye or loop formed by splicing the end of a rope into itself; Eye′-spot, a spot like an eye.—adj. Eye′-spot′ted (Spens.), marked with spots like eyes.—ns. Eye′-stone, a small calcareous body used for removing substances from under the eyelid; Eye′-string, the muscle which raises the eyelid; Eye&p

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Binocular vision

Binocular vision

Binocular vision is vision in which both eyes are used together. The word binocular comes from two Latin roots, bini for double, and oculus for eye. Having two eyes confers at least four advantages over having one. First, it gives a creature a spare eye in case one is damaged. Second, it gives a wider field of view. For example, humans have a maximum horizontal field of view of approximately 190 degrees with two eyes, approximately 120 degrees of which makes up the binocular field of view flanked by two uniocular fields of approximately 40 degrees. Third, it gives binocular summation in which the ability to detect faint objects is enhanced. Fourth, it can give stereopsis in which binocular disparity provided by the two eyes' different positions on the head give precise depth perception. Such binocular vision is usually accompanied by singleness of vision or binocular fusion, in which a single image is seen despite each eye having its own image of any object. Other phenomena of binocular vision include utrocular discrimination, eye dominance, allelotropia, and binocular rivalry. Stereopsis is the impression of depth that is perceived when a scene is viewed with both eyes by someone with normal binocular vision. Binocular viewing of a scene creates two slightly different images of the scene in the two eyes due to the eyes' different positions on the head. These differences, referred to as binocular disparity, provide information that the brain can use to calculate depth in the visual scene, providing a major means of depth perception. The term stereopsis is often used as shorthand for 'binocular vision', 'binocular depth perception' or 'stereoscopic depth perception', though strictly speaking, the impression of depth associated with stereopsis can also be obtained under other conditions, such as when an observer views a scene with only one eye while moving. Observer motion creates differences in the single retinal image over time similar to binocular disparity; this is referred to as motion parallax. Importantly, stereopsis is not usually present when viewing a scene with one eye, when viewing a picture of a scene with both eyes, or when someone with abnormal binocular vision views a scene with both eyes. This is despite the fact that in all these three cases humans can still perceive depth relations.

— Freebase

Eyes only

Eyes only

Eyes only is jargon used with regard to classified information. Whereas a classified document is normally intended to be available to anyone with the appropriate security clearance, an "eyes only" designation, whether official or informal, indicates that the document is intended only for a specific set of readers. As such the document should not be read by other individuals even if they otherwise possess the appropriate clearance. Another meaning is that the document is under no circumstances to be copied or photographed, "eyes only" meaning that it is to be physically read by cleared personnel and nothing more, to ensure that no unauthorized copies of the text are made which might be unaccounted for. EYES ONLY may be used as part of the national caveats in English speaking countries performing as an addition to the security classification. The caveat designates assets of particular sensitivity to, say, the UK, or where dissemination is restricted to individuals from specific foreign nations. Unless explicitly named, information bearing a national caveat will not be sent to foreign governments, overseas contractors, international organisations or released to any foreign nationals. British regulations require notices on the document to specify a level of classification ("TOP SECRET", e.g.) and a "caveat", separated by a hyphen, e.g., TOP SECRET – UK / US EYES ONLYand centered horizontally on the page.

— Wikipedia

Fire-eye

Fire-eye

The fire-eyes, Pyriglena, are a genus of birds in the antbird family Thamnophilidae.The genus contains three species, all found in South America. The fire-eyes are 16–18 cm in length, weigh 25-36 g and have characteristic red eyes that give them their name. They have sexually dimorphic plumage, with the females possessing brown to buff coloured bodies with black tails, and the males being black with small patches of white on the back or wings. The fire-eyes eat a variety of insects, and will regularly follow army ants in order to catch prey flushed by them. Two of the fire-eyes are widespread and safe, but one species, the fringe-backed fire-eye, is threatened with extinction.

— Wikipedia

OOglies

OOglies

OOglies is a stop-motion animated children's television series produced by BBC Scotland for CBBC. The show involves short humorous sketches with household items and food, virtually all of which have googly eyes stuck on, hence the show's title. The show first aired on 10 August 2009 on both CBBC and BBC HD. The commission was for two series of 13 shows, each 15 minutes long. The shows were produced in a block over five months in Glasgow. Voices are provided by Tim Dann, Peter Dickson and Shelley Longworth. The series was created and written ("set free") by Nick Hopkin, Tim Dann and Austin Low. The show returned in 2015 as OOglies Funsize.

— Wikipedia

Electro-magnet, Surgical

Electro-magnet, Surgical

An electro-magnet, generally of straight or bar form, fitted with different shaped pole pieces, used for the extraction of fragments of iron or steel from the eyes. Some very curious cases of successful operations on the eyes of workmen, into whose eyes fragments of steel or iron had penetrated, are on record.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

Vergence

Vergence

A vergence is the simultaneous movement of both eyes in opposite directions to obtain or maintain single binocular vision. When a creature with binocular vision looks at an object, the eyes must rotate around a vertical axis so that the projection of the image is in the centre of the retina in both eyes. To look at an object closer by, the eyes rotate towards each other, while for an object farther away they rotate away from each other. Exaggerated convergence is called cross eyed viewing . When looking into the distance, the eyes diverge until parallel, effectively fixating the same point at infinity. Vergence movements are closely connected to accommodation of the eye. Under normal conditions, changing the focus of the eyes to look at an object at a different distance will automatically cause vergence and accommodation, sometimes known as the accommodation-convergence reflex. As opposed to the 500°/s velocity of saccade movements, vergence movements are far slower, around 25°/s. The extraocular muscles may have two types of fiber each with its own nerve supply, hence a dual mechanism.

— Freebase

Homonymous hemianopsia

Homonymous hemianopsia

Hemianopsia, or hemianopia, is a visual field loss on the left or right side of the vertical midline. It can affect one eye but usually affects both eyes. Homonymous hemianopsia (or homonymous hemianopia) is hemianopic visual field loss on the same side of both eyes. Homonymous hemianopsia occurs because the right half of the brain has visual pathways for the left hemifield of both eyes, and the left half of the brain has visual pathways for the right hemifield of both eyes. When one of these pathways is damaged, the corresponding visual field is lost.

— Wikipedia

Hemianopsia

Hemianopsia

Partial or complete loss of vision in one half of the visual field(s) of one or both eyes. Subtypes include altitudinal hemianopsia, characterized by a visual defect above or below the horizontal meridian of the visual field. Homonymous hemianopsia refers to a visual defect that affects both eyes equally, and occurs either to the left or right of the midline of the visual field. Binasal hemianopsia consists of loss of vision in the nasal hemifields of both eyes. Bitemporal hemianopsia is the bilateral loss of vision in the temporal fields. Quadrantanopsia refers to loss of vision in one quarter of the visual field in one or both eyes.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Gonk

Gonk

A gonk is an egg-shaped furry novelty toy with googly eyes and small arms and legs that was popular in the 1960s. They were created by Robert Benson and Sheila Stanton. They were associated with Op art, hep and mod culture. Gund sold Gonks in the US, including inflatable vinyl versions. Gonks were also homemade. They were featured in the film title design of the 1965 film Gonks Go Beat.

— Freebase

Cookie Monster

Cookie Monster

Cookie Monster is a Muppet on the children's television show Sesame Street. He is best known for his voracious appetite and his famous eating phrases: "Me want cookie!", "Me eat cookie!", and "Om nom nom nom". He often eats anything and everything, including danishes, donuts, lettuce, apples, bananas, as well as normally inedible objects. However, as his name suggests, his preferred food is cookies. Chocolate chip cookies are his favorite kind; oatmeal cookies are his second favorite. In a song in 2004, Cookie Monster revealed that, before he ate his first cookie, he believes his name was Sid. Showing awareness of healthy eating habits for children, since 2006 he has said that cookies are "a sometime snack" and that he also likes fruits and eggplant. According to Christmas Eve on Sesame Street, Cookie Monster is allergic to peanut butter cookies. He is known to have a mother, a younger sister, and an identically-designed cousin, who all share his characteristic blue fur and "googly eyes". He also has a father, who appeared in a Monsterpiece Theater sketch promoting energy conservation, water conservation and environmentalism. Both Cookie Monster's mother and father have his enormous appetite. He and his Sesame Street friends are popular motifs on T-shirts.

— Freebase

Look

Look

to direct the eyes for the purpose of seeing something; to direct the eyes toward an object; to observe with the eyes while keeping them directed; -- with various prepositions, often in a special or figurative sense. See Phrases below

— Webster Dictionary

Eye

Eye

Eyes are organs that detect light and convert it into electro-chemical impulses in neurons. The simplest photoreceptor cells in conscious vision connect light to movement. In higher organisms the eye is a complex optical system which collects light from the surrounding environment, regulates its intensity through a diaphragm, focuses it through an adjustable assembly of lenses to form an image, converts this image into a set of electrical signals, and transmits these signals to the brain through complex neural pathways that connect the eye via the optic nerve to the visual cortex and other areas of the brain. Eyes with resolving power have come in ten fundamentally different forms, and 96% of animal species possess a complex optical system. Image-resolving eyes are present in molluscs, chordates and arthropods. The simplest "eyes", such as those in microorganisms, do nothing but detect whether the surroundings are light or dark, which is sufficient for the entrainment of circadian rhythms. From more complex eyes, retinal photosensitive ganglion cells send signals along the retinohypothalamic tract to the suprachiasmatic nuclei to effect circadian adjustment.

— Freebase

Stereopsis

Stereopsis

Stereopsis is the impression of depth that is perceived when a scene is viewed with both eyes by someone with normal binocular vision. Binocular viewing of a scene creates two slightly different images of the scene in the two eyes due to the eyes' different positions on the head. These differences, referred to as binocular disparity, provide information that the brain can use to calculate depth in the visual scene, providing a major means of depth perception. The term stereopsis is often used as shorthand for 'binocular vision', 'binocular depth perception' or 'stereoscopic depth perception', though strictly speaking, the impression of depth associated with stereopsis can also be obtained under other conditions, such as when an observer views a scene with only one eye while moving. Observer motion creates differences in the single retinal image over time similar to binocular disparity; this is referred to as motion parallax. Importantly, stereopsis is not usually present when viewing a scene with one eye, when viewing a picture of a scene with both eyes, or when someone with abnormal binocular vision views a scene with both eyes. This is despite the fact that in all these three cases humans can still perceive depth relations.

— Freebase

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