Synonyms containing gripe suddenly

We've found 966 synonyms:

plunged

plunged

to (cause someone or something to) move or fall suddenly and often a long way forward, down, or into something;to become lower in value or level very suddenly and quickly;a sudden movement or fall forward, down, or into something;a sudden and large fall in value or level;to move or fall suddenly forward, down, or into something;If a value or price plunges, it suddenly becomes less;If a person or group plunges into an activity, or a place plunges into a condition, it suddenly experiences it;If you plunge into an activity or are plunged into it, you suddenly get very involved in it.If a person or thing is plunged into a particular state or situation, or if they plunge into it, they are suddenly in that state or situation.If you plunge an object into something, you push it quickly or violently into it.to fall quickly from a high position:To move, or to move something downwards:fall,lower,come down;to make someone or something fall quickly from a high position;to slope downwards suddenly; if an amount or level plunges, it suddenly becomes much lower; to move quickly in an uncontrolled way, or to make someone or something move in this way; to suddenly put someone or something in a much less successful situation, or to be suddenly put in such a situation;to cause to penetrate or enter quickly and forcibly into something; to cause to enter a state or course of action usually suddenly, unexpectedly, or violently ; to thrust or cast oneself into or as if into water;to become pitched or thrown headlong or violently forward and downward,to move oneself in such a manner,to descend or dip suddenly.dive, pitch, sound.

— Editors Contribution

Gripe water

Gripe water

Gripe water is a home remedy for infants with colic, gastrointestinal discomfort, teething pain, reflux and other stomach ailments. Its ingredients vary, and may include alcohol, a bicarbonate, ginger, dill, fennel and chamomile. It is typically given to an infant with a dropper in liquid form, and adults may also take gripe water for soothing intestinal pains, gas or other stomach ailments. There is no clinical evidence for the effectiveness of gripe water.

— Freebase

Start

Start

stärt, v.i. to move suddenly aside: to wince: to deviate: to begin: to proceed: to give way somewhat.—v.t. to cause to move suddenly: to disturb suddenly: to rouse suddenly from concealment: to set in motion: to call forth: to invent or discover: to move suddenly from its place: to loosen: to empty: to pour out.—n. a sudden movement: a sudden motion of the body: a sudden rousing to action: an unexpected movement: a sally: a sudden fit: a quick spring: the first motion from a point or place: the outset.—n. Start′er, one who starts.—adj. Start′ful, apt to start.—adv. Start′ingly (Shak.), by fits or starts.—ns. Start′ing-point, the point from which anything starts, or from which motion begins; Start′ing-post, the post or barrier from which the competitors in a race start or begin the race.—adj. Start′ish, apt to start, skittish.—ns. Start′-up (Shak.), an upstart; Start′uppe (Spens.), a kind of high shoe or half-boot.—Start after, to set out after, to pursue; Start up, to rise suddenly, to come suddenly into notice.—Get, or Have, the start, to begin before another, to obtain an advantage over another. [M. E. sterten; closely akin to Dut. and Low Ger. storten, to plunge, Ger. stürzen.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Seize

Seize

to fall or rush upon suddenly and lay hold of; to gripe or grasp suddenly; to reach and grasp

— Webster Dictionary

Gripe

Gripe

to clutch, hold, or pinch a thing, esp. money, with a gripe or as with a gripe

— Webster Dictionary

Grip

Grip

grip, n. grasp or firm hold with the hand, &c.: the handle or part by which anything is grasped: a mode of grasping, a particular mode of grasping hands for mutual recognition, as by Freemasons: a clutching device connecting a car with a moving traction-cable: oppression: pinching distress.—v.t. to take fast hold of, to grasp or gripe:—pr.p. grip′ping; pa.p. gripped, gript.—v.t. Grīpe, to grasp with the hand: to seize and hold fast: to squeeze: to give pain to the bowels.—n. fast hold, grasp: forcible retention: a griffin: a usurer: (pl.) severe spasmodic pain in the intestines.—n. Grīp′er.—p.adj. Grīp′ing, avaricious: of a pain that catches or seizes acutely.—adv. Grīp′ingly, in a griping or oppressive manner.—ns. Grippe, influenza or epidemic catarrh; Grip′per, one who, or that which, grips.—adj. Grip′ple (Spens.), griping, grasping: greedy.—n. a gripe.—n. Grip′-sack, a hand-satchel.—Lose one's grip, to lose hold or control. [A.S. grípan, grap, gripen; Ice. grípa, Ger. grei′fen, Dut. grijpen; allied to grab.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pinch

Pinch

pinsh, v.t. to grip hard: to squeeze between two hard or firm substances: to squeeze the flesh so as to give pain: to nip: to distress: to gripe.—v.i. to act with force: to bear or press hard: to live sparingly.—n. a close compression with the fingers: what can be taken up between the finger and thumb: an iron bar used as a lever for lifting weights, rolling wheels, &c.: a gripe: distress: oppression.—n. Pinch′commons, a niggard, a miser.—adj. Pinched, having the appearance of being tightly squeezed: hard pressed by want or cold: narrowed in size.—ns. Pinch′er, one who, or that which, pinches; Pinch′ers, Pin′cers, an instrument for gripping anything firmly, esp. for drawing out nails, &c.; Pinch′fist, Pinch′gut Pinch′penny, a niggard.—adv. Pinch′ingly, in a pinching manner.—At a pinch, in a case of necessity; Know where the shoe pinches, to know where the cause of trouble or difficulty is. [O. Fr. pincer; prob. Teut., cf. Dut. pitsen, to pinch.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Plunge

Plunge

plunj, v.t. to cast suddenly into water or other fluid: to force suddenly (into): to immerse.—v.i. to sink suddenly into any fluid: to dive: to pitch suddenly forward and throw up the hind-legs, as a horse: to rush into any danger: (slang) to gamble recklessly.—n. act of plunging: act of rushing headlong, as a horse.—n. Plung′er, one who plunges: a diver: a long solid cylinder used as a forcer in pumps: (mil.) a cavalry-man: one who bets heavily.—adj. Plung′ing, rushing headlong: aimed from higher ground, as fire upon an enemy.—n. the putting or sinking under water, or other fluid: the act of a horse trying to throw its rider.—Plunge bath, a bath large enough to allow the whole body under water. [O. Fr. plonger—L. plumbum, lead.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Spring

Spring

spring, v.i. to bound: to leap: to rush hastily: to move suddenly by elastic force: to start up suddenly: to break forth: to appear: to issue: to come into existence: (B.) to rise, as the sun.—v.t. to cause to spring up: to start: to produce quickly, cause to act suddenly: to leap over: to explode, as a mine: to open, as a leak: to crack, as a mast: to bend by force, strain: (archit.) to start from an abutment, &c.: to set together with bevel-joints:—pa.t. sprang, sprung; pa.p. sprung.—n. a leap: a flying back with elastic force: elastic power: an elastic body: any active power: that by which action is produced: cause or origin: a source: an outflow of water from the earth: (B.) the dawn: the time when plants begin to spring up and grow, the vernal season—March, April, May: a starting of a plank in a vessel: a crack in a mast.—ns. Spring′al, Spring′ald, an active springy young man, a youth; Spring′-back, an inner false joint on a bound book, springing upward from the true or outer back when the book is opened flat; Spring′-bal′ance, an instrument for determining the weight of a body by the elasticity of a spiral spring; Spring′-beam, a beam of considerable span, without central support, the tie-beam of a truss; in a steamer, a fore-and-aft beam for connecting the two paddle-beams: an elastic bar at the top of a tilt-hammer, jig-saw, &c.; Spring′-beau′ty, the Claytonia Virginica; Spring′-bed, a mattress formed of spiral springs set in a wooden frame; Spring′-bee′tle, an elater; Spring′-board, a board fastened on elastic supports, used to spring from in performing feats of agility; Spring′bok, a beautiful South African antelope, larger than a roebuck [Dut.]; Spring′-box, a box or barrel in which a spring is coiled: the frame of a sofa, &c., in which the springs are set; Spring′-carr′iage, a wheel-carriage mounted on springs; Spring′-cart, a light cart mounted upon springs; Spring′er, a kind of dog of the spaniel class, useful for springing game in copses: one who springs: the bottom stone of an arch; Spring′-gun, a gun having wires connected with its trigger, and so fixed and planted as to be discharged when trespassers stumble against the wire; Spring′-halt, a jerking lameness in which a horse suddenly twitches up his leg or legs; Spring′-hamm′er, a machine-hammer in which the blow is delivered or augmented by the force of a spring; Spring′-head, a fountain-head, source: a head or end-piece for a carriage-spring.—adj. Spring′-head′ed (Spens.), having heads springing afresh.—ns. Spring′-heeled Jack, one supposed capable of leaping a great height or distance in carrying out mischievous or frolicsome tricks; Spring′-hook, an angler's snap-hook or spear-hook: a latch or door-hook with a spring-catch for keeping it fast in the staple: in a locomotive, a hook fixing the driving-wheel spring to the frame; Spring′-house, a house for keeping meat in, or a dairy, built for coolness over a spring or brook; Spring′iness;

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Strike

Strike

strīk, v.t. to give a blow to: to hit with force, to smite: to pierce: to dash: to stamp: to coin: to thrust in: to cause to sound: to let down, as a sail: to ground upon, as a ship: to punish: to affect strongly: to affect suddenly with alarm or surprise: to make a compact or agreement, to ratify: to take down and remove: to erase (with out, off): to come upon unexpectedly: to occur to: to appear to: to assume: to hook a fish by a quick turn of the wrist: (slang) to steal: (B.) to stroke.—v.i. to give a quick blow: to hit: to dash: to sound by being struck: to touch: to run aground: to pass with a quick effect: to dart: to take root: to lower the flag in token of respect or surrender: to give up work in order to secure higher wages or the redress of some grievance: (U.S.) to do menial work for an officer: to become saturated with salt: to run, or fade in colour:—pa.t. struck; pa.p. struck (obs. strick′en).n. act of striking for higher wages: (geol.) the direction of the outcrop of a stratum—the line which it makes when it appears at the surface of the earth, always being at right angles to the dip of the bend: (U.S.) any dishonest attempt to extort money by bringing in a bill in the hope of being bought off by those interested: full measure, esp. of malt: the whole coinage made at one time: an imperfect matrix for type: the metal plate into which a door-latch strikes as the door closes: the crystalline appearance of hard soaps.—ns. Strike′-pay, an allowance paid by a trades-union to men on strike; Strīk′er, one who, or that which, strikes: a green-hand on shipboard.—adj. Strīk′ing, affecting: surprising: forcible: impressive: exact.—adv. Strīk′ingly.—n. Strīk′ingness, quality of being striking, or of affecting or surprising.—Strike a balance, to bring out the relative state of a debtor and creditor account; Strike a tent, to take it down; Strike down, to prostrate by a blow or by illness; Strike for, to start suddenly for; Strike from, to remove with a stroke; Strike hands (B.), to become surety for any one; Strike home, to strike right to the point aimed at; Strike in, to enter suddenly: to interpose; Strike into, to enter upon suddenly, to break into; Strike off, to erase from an account, to deduct: to print: to separate by a blow; Strike oil, to find petroleum when boring for it: to make a lucky hit; Strike out, to efface: to bring into light: to direct one's course boldly outwards: to strike from the shoulder: to form by sudden effort; Strike sail, to take in sail: to stop; Strike up, to begin to beat, sing, or play; Strike work, to cease work. [A.S. strícan; Ger. streichen, to move, to strike.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pop

Pop

to thrust or push suddenly; to offer suddenly; to bring suddenly and unexpectedly to notice; as, to pop one's head in at the door

— Webster Dictionary

Grab

Grab

to gripe suddenly; to seize; to snatch; to clutch

— Webster Dictionary

Arena Gripe

Arena Gripe

Arena Gripe is an indoor sporting arena located in Split, Croatia. It is part of Sport Recreation Center. It features two halls. The capacity of the lesser arena is 3,500 people. The seating capacity of the larger one is 6,000. It is currently home to the KK Split basketball team. It is used for many sports, as well as concerts. Two night clubs are incorporated in the center, as well as numerous shops, coffeehouses and restaurants. Arena was built in late 1970s, for 1979 Mediterranean Games.

— Freebase

Clap

Clap

klap, n. the noise made by the sudden striking together of two things, as the hands: a burst of sound: a slap.—v.t. to strike together so as to make a noise: to thrust or drive together suddenly: to fasten promptly: to pat with the hand in a friendly manner: to applaud with the hands: to bang: to imprison—e.g. 'to clap one in prison.'—v.i. to strike the hands together: to strike together with noise: to applaud:—pr.p. clap′ping; pa.p. clapped.—ns. Clap′-board, a thin board used in covering wooden houses; Clap′-bread, a kind of hard-baked oatmeal cake; Clap′-dish (same as Clack-dish); Clap′-net, a kind of net which is made to clap together suddenly by pulling a string; Clap′per, one who claps: that which claps, as the tongue of a bell: a glib tongue.—v.t. Clap′per-claw, to claw or scratch: (Shak.) to scold.—ns. Clap′ping, noise of striking: applause; Clap′-sill, the bottom part of the frame on which lock-gates shut—called also Lock-sill; Clap′trap (Shak.), a trick to gain applause: flashy display: empty words; Claptrap′pery.—adj. Claptrap′pish.—Clap eyes on, to see; Clap hands (Shak.), to make an agreement; Clap hold of, to seize roughly; Clap up (Shak.), to conclude suddenly. [Ice. klappa, to pat; Dut. and Ger. klappen.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Plump

Plump

plump, adv. falling straight downward (like lead): heavily: suddenly.—adj. downright: unqualified.—v.i. to fall or sink suddenly: to give all one's votes to one candidate where there are more than one to be elected.—v.t. to cause to fall suddenly.—n. (Scot.) a sudden downfall of rain.—n. Plump′er, a vote given to one candidate only when more than one are to be elected: one who so votes: (slang) a downright lie.—adv. Plump′ly, fully, without reserve. [Plumb.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. fallacious
  • B. ambidextrous
  • C. ripe
  • D. reprehensible