Synonyms containing ilocano

We've found 29 synonyms:

kinilaw

kinilaw

Root word is; kilaw; an ilocano word for raw fish meat, beef, goat, shrimp, squid, octopus etc. Kinilaw is the past tense in ilocano. Kilawen is the food to eat. Kilawin is tagalog word taken from the ilocano version.

— Editors Contribution

Ilocano

Ilocano

Of or pertaining to the Ilocano.

— Wiktionary

Ilocano language

Ilocano language

Ilocano (also Ilokano; ; Ilocano: Pagsasao nga Ilokano) is the third most-spoken native language of the Philippines. An Austronesian language, it is related to such languages as Malay (Indonesian and Malaysian), Tetum, Chamorro, Fijian, Maori, Hawaiian, Samoan, Tahitian, Paiwan and Malagasy. It is closely related to some of the other Austronesian languages of Northern Luzon, and has slight mutual intelligibility with the Balangao language and the eastern dialects of the Bontoc language. The Ilokano people had their own distinct indigenous writing system and script known as kur-itan. There have been proposals to revive the kur-itan script by teaching it in Ilokano-majority public and private schools in Ilocos Norte and Ilocos Sur.

— Wikipedia

Pangasinan

Pangasinan

Pangasinan is a province of the Republic of the Philippines. The provincial capital is Lingayen. Pangasinan is located on the western area of the island of Luzon along the Lingayen Gulf and South China Sea. It has a total land area of 5,451.01 square kilometres. According to the 2010 census, it has a population of 2,779,862 people. The official number of registered voters in Pangasinan is 1,651,814. Pangasinan is the name for the province, the people, and the primary language spoken in the province. Indigenous Pangasinan speakers are estimated to number at least 1.5 million. The Pangasinan language is one of the officially recognized regional languages in the Philippines. Pangasinan is spoken as a second-language by many of the ethnic minorities in Pangasinan. The most significant minority ethnic groups in Pangasinan are the Ilocano, Bolinao, and Tagalog. The name Pangasinan means "place for salt" or "place of salt-making"; it is derived from the prefix pang, meaning "for", the root word asin, meaning "salt”, and suffix an, signifying "location." The province is a major producer of salt in the Philippines. Its major products include "bagoong" and "alamang"

— Freebase

Conquian

Conquian

Conquian is a card game which probably dates back to seventeenth-century Central America, but which was popularized and extended to the United States, especially Texas, from Mexico, although this allegation is still much controversial. It was first described in detail in R. F. Foster's Hoyle in 1897. And according to David Parlett, it is an ancestor to all modern rummy games, a kind of proto-Gin Rummy. The name is thought to either derive from "con quién" – Spanish "with whom", or from the Chinese game Kon Khin, a variation of the earlier game Khanhoo. It is sometimes corrupted to Coon Can, Councan, Conca and Cunca, a South American variation of the game. However, no Chinese card game by the name of ‘Kon Khin’ has ever been found, and these words do not even match any of the many card games that have prevailed in Ming-Qing China. In 19th-century Mexican literature the word is spelled cunquián, in italics, showing thus it has nothing to do with the phrase "¿Con quién?". It is much more tempting to relate Conquian to the 19th-century Philippine card game Kungkian, or Kungkiyang, which Ilocano and Cebuano dictionaries define as "A card game, the same as the pañggiñggí [i.e. Panguingue], except that there are only two players."

— Freebase

Gaddang Language

Gaddang Language

The Gaddang language is spoken by up to 30,000 speakers in the Philippines, particularly along the Magat and upper Cagayan rivers in the Region II provinces of Nueva Vizcaya and Isabela and by overseas migrants to countries in Asia, Australia, Canada, Europe, in the Middle East, UK and the U.S.A.. Most Gaddang speakers also speak Ilocano, the lingua franca of Northern Luzon, as well as Tagalog and English. Gaddang is associated with the "Christianized Gaddang" people, and is closely related to the highland tongues of Ga'dang with 6,000 speakers, Cagayan Agta with less than 1,000 and Atta with 2,000, and more distantly to Ibanag, Itawis, Yogad, Isneg and Malaweg. The Gaddang tongue has been vanishing from daily and public life over the past half-century. Public and church-sponsored education was historically conducted in Spanish or English, and now in Tagalog. Once significantly-Gaddang communities grew exponentially after WWII due to in-migration of Ilokano, Tagalog, Igorot, and other ethnicities; Gaddang is now a minority language. In the 2000 Census, Gaddang was not even an identity option for residents of Nueva Vizcaya. Vocablulary and structural features of Gaddang among native Gaddang speakers have suffered as well, as usages from Ilokano and other languages affect their parole. Finally, many ethnic Gaddang have migrated to other countries, and their children are not learning the ancestral tongue.

— Freebase

Kinilnat

Kinilnat

Kinilnat, or ensalada, is an Ilocano salad. Popular vegetables that are used as ingredients to this dish include the shoots and leaves of the sweet potato and bitter melon, shoots and the fruits of the string bean, and horseradish tree leaves and blossoms, taro, cabbage, blossoms of the West-Indian pea, and winged beans, fern shoots, or other various vegetables such as eggplant. The leaves, shoots, blossoms, or the other parts of the plant are boiled and drained and dressed with bagoong or patis, and sometimes souring agents like calamansi or cherry tomatoes are added, as well as freshly ground ginger.

— Freebase

Aeta people

Aeta people

The Aeta, or Agta, are an indigenous people who live in scattered, isolated mountainous parts of the island of Luzon, the Philippines. These peoples are considered to be Negritos, whose skin ranges from dark to very dark brown, and possessing features such as a small stature and frame; hair of a curly to kinky texture and a higher frequency of naturally lighter colour relative to the general population; small nose; and dark brown eyes. They are thought to be among the earliest inhabitants of the Philippines, preceding the Austronesian migrations. The Aeta were included in the group of people termed "Negrito" during Spanish Era. Various Aeta groups in northern Luzon are known as Pugut or Pugot, an Ilocano term that also means "goblin" or "forest spirit", and is the colloquial term for people with darker complexions. These names are mostly considered inappropriate or derogatory by fellow Negritos of northern Luzon.

— Freebase

colot

colot

Colot in Ilocano language is a kind of edible seaweed that grows in the warm waters of northern Luzon. It is best eaten as salad by boiling it first after removing some stones and other foreign bodies clinging to it and then mix it with some spices like chopped ginger, chopped shallots, sliced tomato, lemon juice and salted to taste. It is also mixed with dinengdeng to give it good texture and improve its flavor.

— Editors Contribution

Inabel

Inabel

Inabel, sometimes referred to as Abel Iloco or simply Abel, is a form of weaving tradition native to the Ilocano people of Northern Luzon in the Philippines.

— Wikipedia

Besao

Besao

Besao, officially the Municipality of Besao is a 5th class municipality in the province of Mountain Province, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 7,040 people.The municipality of Besao is believed to have derived its name from the Ilocano word ”Buso”, meaning headhunter. The people then of the neighboring towns specifically those from the Ilocos Region believed that the early ”Besaos” were headhunters. The word later on evolved as it is now called – Besao. The town is known for the Agawa people's Agricultural Stone Calendar of Gueday. The stone calendar is one of the most enigmatic artifact in the Cordillera mountains. It is a testimony to the accurate scientific outlook of the ancient Agawa people in the cycle of weathers, agriculture, and heavenly bodies.

— Wikipedia

Filipino cuisine

Filipino cuisine

Filipino cuisine (Filipino: Lutuing Pilipino/Pagkaing Pilipino) is composed of the cuisines of more than a hundred distinct ethno-linguistic groups found throughout the Philippine archipelago. However, a majority of mainstream Filipino dishes that compose Filipino cuisine are from the cuisines of the Ilocano, Pangasinan, Kapampangan, Tagalog, Bicolano, Visayan (Cebuano, Hiligaynon and Waray), Chavacano and Maranao ethno-linguistic groups. The style of food making and the food associated with it have evolved over many centuries from their Austronesian origins (shared with Malaysian and Indonesian cuisines) to a mixed cuisine of Indian, Chinese, Spanish and American influences, in line with the major waves of influence that had enriched the cultures of the archipelago, as well as others adapted to indigenous ingredients and the local palate.Dishes range from the very simple, like a meal of fried salted fish and rice, to fish curry, chicken curry, complex paellas and cozidos of Iberian origin created for fiestas. Popular dishes include: lechón (whole roasted pig), longganisa (Philippine sausage), tapa (cured beef), torta (omelette), adobo (chicken or pork braised in garlic, vinegar, oil and soy sauce, or cooked until dry), dinuguan (pork blood stew), kaldereta (meat stewed in tomato sauce), mechado (larded beef in soy and tomato sauce), pochero (beef and bananas in tomato sauce), afritada (chicken or pork and vegetables simmered in tomato sauce), kare-kare (oxtail and vegetables cooked in peanut sauce), pinakbet (kabocha squash, eggplant, beans, okra, and tomato stew flavored with shrimp paste), crispy pata (deep-fried pig's leg), hamonado (pork sweetened in pineapple sauce), sinigang (meat or seafood in sour broth), pancit (noodles), and lumpia (fresh or fried spring rolls). Various food scholars have noted that Filipino cuisine is multi-faceted and is the most representative in the culinary world for food where 'East meets West'.

— Wikipedia

Ibanag language

Ibanag language

The Ibanag language (also Ybanag or Ibanak) is spoken by up to 500,000 speakers, most particularly by the Ibanag people, in the Philippines, in the northeastern provinces of Isabela and Cagayan, especially in Tuguegarao, Solana, Abulug, Cabagan, and Ilagan and with overseas immigrants in countries located in the Middle East, United Kingdom and the United States. Most of the speakers can also speak Ilocano, the lingua franca of northern Luzon island. The name Ibanag comes from the prefix "I" which means "people of", and "bannag", meaning river. It is closely related to Gaddang, Itawis, Agta, Atta, Yogad, Isneg, and Malaweg.

— Wikipedia

Kampilan

Kampilan

The kampilan (Baybayin: ᜃᜋ᜔ᜉᜒᜎᜈ᜔; Abecedario: Campilan) is a type of single-edged long sword, traditionally used by various ethnic groups in the Philippine archipelago. The kampilan has a distinct profile, with the tapered blade being much broader and thinner at the point than at its base, sometimes with a protruding spikelet along the flat side of the tip and a bifurcated hilt which is believed to represent a mythical creature's open mouth.The Maguindanaons and the Maranaos of mainland Mindanao preferred this weapon as opposed to the Tausūg of Sulu who favoured the barung. The Kapampangan name of the Kampilan was Talibong and the hilt on the Talibong represented the dragon Naga, however the creature represented varies between different ethnic groups. Its use by the Ilocanos have also been seen in various ancient records. Pieces of Visayan kampilans are distinguished by their Mindanao counterparts by the way hilts are made. The native Mëranaw name of the Kampilan was Kifing, while in the Iranun language, it is known as Parang Kampilan.A notable wielder of the kampílan was Datu Lapu-Lapu (the ruler of Mactan) and his warriors, who defeated the Spaniards and killed Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan at the Battle of Mactan on April 27, 1521.The kampílan was earliest mentioned in ancient Filipino epics in Hiligaynon Hinilawod from the Visayas and Ilocano Biag ni Lam-Ang from Luzon. This particular design of sword was not uncommon among the various ethnic tribes throughout the pre-Hispanic Philippine archipelago. Today, the kampílan is portrayed in Filipino art and ancient tradition. In Borneo, the Dayak people are also known to forge kampilan. The officers who bear the royal regalia of the Sultan of Brunei such as the Panglima Agsar who carry the royal weapons of kelasak (shield) and kampilan, whereas the Panglima Raja carry the pemuras (royal gun) and kampilan.

— Wikipedia

Sarangani

Sarangani

Sarangani (Cebuano: Lalawigan sa Sarangani; Hiligaynon: Kapuoran sang Sarangani; Ilocano: Probinsia ti Sarangani) is a province in the Philippines located in the Soccsksargen region. Its capital is Alabel. With a 230-kilometre (140 mi) coastline along the Sarangani Bay and Celebes Sea, the province is at the southernmost tip of Mindanao island, and borders South Cotabato and Davao del Sur to the north, Davao Occidental to the east, and the Celebes Sea to the south. Sarangani is part of the South Cotabato-Cotabato-Sultan Kudarat-Sarangani-General Santos City (SOCCSKSARGEN) development cluster, and is linked by paved roads to the international airport and harbor of General Santos City. The province is divided into two sections, separated by the Sarangani Bay and General Santos City, and it used to be part of South Cotabato until it was made an independent province in 1992.

— Wikipedia

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
A synonym of "kittenish"
  • A. frisky
  • B. sober
  • C. serious
  • D. unplayful