Synonyms containing in abraham's bosom Page #2

We've found 461 synonyms:

abraham-men

abraham-men

A cant term for vagabonds, who formerly begged about under pretence of having been discharged destitute from ships and hospitals; whence an idle malingerer wanting to enter the doctor's list is said to "sham Abraham." From a ward in Bedlam which was appropriated for the reception of idiots, which was named Abraham: it is a very old term, and was cited by Burton in the Anatomy of Melancholy so far back as 1621.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

Bosom

Bosom

the part of the dress worn upon the breast; an article, or a portion of an article, of dress to be worn upon the breast; as, the bosom of a shirt; a linen bosom

— Webster Dictionary

Bosomed

Bosomed

having, or resembling, bosom; kept in the bosom; hidden

— Webster Dictionary

Promise

Promise

prom′is, n. an engagement made by a person either verbally or in writing to do or keep from doing something: expectation or that which causes expectation: a ground for hope of future excellence: (rare) fulfilment of what is promised.—v.t. to make an engagement to do or not to do something: to afford reason to expect: to assure: to engage to bestow.—v.i. to assure one by a promise: to afford hopes or expectations: (rare) to stand sponsor.—ns. Prom′ise-breach (Shak.), violation of promise; Prom′ise-break′er (Shak.), a violator of promises.—adj. Prom′ise-crammed (Shak.), crammed or filled with promises.—ns. Promisēē′, the person to whom a promise is made; Prom′iser, Prom′isor.—adj. Prom′ising, affording ground for hope or expectation: likely to turn out well.—advs. Prom′isingly; Prom′issorily.—adj. Prom′issory, containing a promise of some engagement to be fulfilled.—n. Prom′issory-note, a note by one person promising to pay a sum of money to another, or to bearer, at a certain date, or at sight, or on demand.—Promised land, the land promised by God to Abraham and his seed: Canaan: heaven.—Be promised (rare), to have an engagement; Breach of promise (see Breach); Conditional promise, a promise of which the obligation depends on certain conditions—opp. to Absolute promise; Express promise, a promise expressed orally or in writing; The Promise, the assurance of God to Abraham that his descendants should become the chosen people. [Fr. promesse—L. promissa, promittĕre, to send forward—pro, forward, mittĕre, to send.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sham

Sham

sham, n. a pretence: that which deceives expectation: imposture.—adj. pretended: false.—v.t. to pretend: to feign: to impose upon.—v.i. to make false pretences:—pr.p. sham′ming; pa.t. and pa.p. shammed.—ns. Sham′-fight, a fight in imitation of a real one; Sham′mer, one who shams.—Sham Abraham (see Abraham-man). [Shame.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Zimran

Zimran

Zimran (Hebrew: זִמְרָן‬, "vine dresser; celebrated; song;"; Arabic: زمران‎), also known as Zambran. was according to the Hebrew Bible the son of Abraham, the patriarch of the Israelites, and Keturah, whom he wed after the death of Sarah. Zimran had five other brothers, Jokshan, Medan, Midian, Ishbak, and Shuah.Josephus tells us that "Abraham contrived to settle them in colonies; and they took possession of Troglodytis and the country of Arabia Felix, as far as it reaches to the Red Sea." Abraham, in all probability, tried to keep them apart from Isaac to avoid conflict while fulfilling God's commission to spread out and inhabit the globe. For such reasons Zimran has also been tentatively identified by some with the Arabian town of Zabran, between Mecca and Medina (that is, Jeddah). According to the Book of Jasher, the children of Zimran were Abihen, Molich and Narim. Professor Jan Retso and William Hazlitt (registrar) suggested that the descendants of Zimran are the same people known as "Banizomenes" which were mentioned in the records of the Greek historian Diodorus Siculus.

— Wikipedia

Abraham Abraham

Abraham Abraham

Abraham Abraham (March 9, 1843 – June 28, 1911) was an American businessman and the founder of the Brooklyn department store Abraham & Straus, founded 1865. The chain, which became part of Federated Department Stores, is now part of Macy's.

— Wikipedia

Abrahamic religions

Abrahamic religions

The Abrahamic religions, also referred to collectively as Abrahamism, are a group of Semitic-originated religious communities of faith that posit descent from Abraham and the worship of the God of Abraham. The Abrahamic religions are monotheistic, with the term deriving from the patriarch Abraham (a major biblical figure from the Old Testament, which is recognized by Jews, Christians, Muslims, and others).Abrahamic religion spread globally through Christianity being adopted by the Roman Empire in the 4th century and Islam by the Islamic Empires from the 7th century. Today the Abrahamic religions are one of the major divisions in comparative religion (along with Indian, Iranian, and East Asian religions). The major Abrahamic religions in chronological order of founding are Judaism (the base of the other two religions) in the 7th century BCE, Christianity in the 1st century CE, and Islam in the 7th century CE. Christianity, Islam, and Judaism are the Abrahamic religions with the greatest numbers of adherents. Abrahamic religions with fewer adherents include the faiths descended from Yazdânism (the Yezidi, Yarsani faiths), Samaritanism, the Druze faith, Bábism, the Bahá'í Faith, and Rastafari.As of 2005, estimates classified 54% (3.6 billion people) of the world's population as adherents of an Abrahamic religion, about 32% as adherents of other religions, and 16% as adherents of no organized religion. Christianity claims 33% of the world's population, Islam has 21%, Judaism has 0.2% and the Bahá'í Faith represents around 0.1%.

— Wikipedia

Jehovah-jireh

Jehovah-jireh

In the Book of Genesis, Jehovah-jireh or Yahweh Yireh (Jehovah/Yahweh will provide) was a place in the land of Moriah. It was the location of the binding of Isaac, where God told Abraham to offer his son Isaac as a burnt offering. Abraham named the place after God provided a ram to sacrifice in place of Isaac. The phrase continues to be used among Christians. "And Abraham called the name of that place Jehovahjireh: as it is said to this day, In the mount of the Lord it shall be seen." – Genesis 22:14 (KJV)

— Wikipedia

Ishbak

Ishbak

Ishbak (Hebrew: וְיִשְׁבָּ֣ק ish'băk; "he will leave; leaving"), also spelled Jisbak and Josabak. According to the Bible he was the fifth son of Abraham, the patriarch of the Israelites, and Keturah whom he wed after the death of Sarah. Ishbak had five brothers, Zimran, Jokshan, Medan, Midian and Shuah.Josephus tells us that "Abraham contrived to settle them in colonies; and they took possession of Troglodytis and the country of Arabia the Happy, as far as it reaches to the Red Sea." Abraham in all probability, tried to keep them apart from Isaac to avoid conflict while fulfilling God's commission to spread out and inhabit the globe. Little else is known about him, but his descendants may be the people identified in a cuneiform inscription to a people known as Jasbuqu.

— Wikipedia

Isaac

Isaac

Isaac as described in the Hebrew Bible and the Qur'an, was the only son Abraham had with his wife Sarah, and was the father of Jacob and Esau. Isaac was one of the three patriarchs of the Israelites. According to the Book of Genesis, Abraham was 100 years old when Isaac was born, and Sarah was beyond childbearing years. Isaac was the only biblical patriarch whose name was not changed, and the only one who did not leave Canaan. Compared to those of Abraham and Jacob, Isaac's story relates fewer incidents of his life. He died when he was 180 years old, making him the longest-lived patriarch.

— Freebase

Abraham-men

Abraham-men

The Abraham-men were a class of beggars claiming to be lunatics allowed out of restraint, in the Tudor and Stuart periods in England. The phrase normally refers to the practice of beggars pretending that they were patients discharged from the Abraham ward at Bedlam. The phrase can be traced back as far as 1561, when it was given as one of The Fraternity of Vagabonds, by John Awdeley. It also appears in the taxonomy of rogues given by Thomas Harman, which was copied by later writers of rogue literature. The author of O Per Se O reported that Abram-men made marks on their arms with 'burnt paper, piss and gunpowder' to show they had been in Bedlam Hospital: "some dance, but keep no measure; others leap up and down". The phrase Abraham-men also appears as a disguise for Edgar in King Lear and John Fletcher's Beggar's Bush. They were called anticks or God's minstrels, and later Poor Toms, from the popular song "Tom of Bedlam". John Aubrey, the antiquary, said they were common before the English Civil War, and wore a badge of tin on their left arms, an ox horn around their necks, a long staff and fantastical clothing. However, the badge seems to have been in myth. It may have been convenient theatrical property. Richard Head wrote in The Canting Academy, or Devils Cabinet opened that they

— Freebase

Lincoln Memorial

Lincoln Memorial

The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. across from the Washington Monument. The architect was Henry Bacon, the sculptor of the primary statue – Abraham Lincoln, 1920 – was Daniel Chester French, and the painter of the interior murals was Jules Guerin. Dedicated in 1922, it is one of several monuments built to honor an American president. The building is in the form of a Greek Doric temple and contains a large seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln and inscriptions of two well-known speeches by Lincoln, The Gettysburg Address and his Second Inaugural Address. The memorial has been the site of many famous speeches, including Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech, delivered on August 28, 1963 during the rally at the end of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Like other monuments on the National Mall – including the nearby Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Korean War Veterans Memorial, and National World War II Memorial – the memorial is administered by the National Park Service under its National Mall and Memorial Parks group. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since October 15, 1966. It is open to the public 24 hours a day. In 2007, it was ranked seventh on the List of America's Favorite Architecture by the American Institute of Architects.

— Freebase

Bosom of Abraham

Bosom of Abraham

"Bosom of Abraham" refers to the place of comfort in sheol where the Jews said the righteous dead awaited Judgment Day.

— Freebase

In Abraham's Bosom

In Abraham's Bosom

In Abraham's Bosom is a play by American dramatist Paul Green. Its original Broadway run starred Charles Sidney Gilpin as an African-American farmer from North Carolina whose efforts at self-improvement are thwarted by segregation. Green received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the work in 1927.

— Freebase

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
An antonym for "prosperous"
  • A. achromatic
  • B. palmy
  • C. flourishing
  • D. comfortable