Synonyms containing in abraham's bosom Page #3

We've found 461 synonyms:

Refrigerium

Refrigerium

The Latin word refrigerium literally means ‘refreshment’, and is the origin of the English noun ‘refrigerator’. In ancient Rome, the word refrigerium referred specifically to a commemorative meal for the dead consumed in a graveyard. These meals were held on the day of burial, then again on the ninth day after the funeral, and annually thereafter. Early Christians continued the refrigerium ritual, by taking food to gravesites and catacombs in honor of Christian martyrs, as well as relatives. The early Christian theologian Tertullian used the term refrigerium interim to describe a happy state in which the souls of the blessed are refreshed while they await the Last Judgment and their definitive entry into Heaven. Later Christian writers referred to a similar, interim state of grace as the "Bosom of Abraham". Tertullian's notions of refrigerium were part of a debate on whether the souls of the dead had to await the End of Times and the Last Judgment before their entrance into either Heaven or Hell, or whether, on the other hand, each soul was assigned its place in the eternal afterlife immediately after death.

— Freebase

Embosom

Embosom

em-booz′um, Imbosom, im-, v.t. to take into the bosom: to receive into the affections: to enclose or surround. [Em, in, into, and bosom.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

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apple dumplin shop

A woman's bosom.

— Wiktionary

embosom

embosom

To draw to or into one's bosom; to treasure.

— Wiktionary

imbosom

imbosom

To draw to or into one's bosom; to treasure.

— Wiktionary

bosomy

bosomy

having a large bosom

— Wiktionary

cater-cousin

cater-cousin

A close or good friend. An intimate. A bosom friend. An intimate friend who is not a blood relation. A person treated as a cousin (relative) who is not a blood relation

— Wiktionary

boobage

boobage

Bosom, breasts.

— Wiktionary

bosomed

bosomed

Having a bosom (of a specified kind).

— Wiktionary

Megget

Megget

Megget is a former chapelry or parish containing the valley of Megget Water, now forming the westernmost part of the parish of Yarrow, Selkirkshire in the Scottish Borders area of Scotland. The centre of the valley is 19 miles west of Selkirk. The district is bordered on the west by the parish of Tweedsmuir, on the north-west by Drumelzier and on the north by Manor (all in Peeblesshire). On the east side it is joined to the rest of the present parish of Yarrow, but formerly the parish boundary with Yarrow ran southwards from Black Law to Deer Law to Cappercleuch burn thence to St. Mary's Loch and continued down the west shore of the loch for almost a mile to Mare Cleuch by the Rodono Hotel. It is bounded on the south by Ettrick in Selkirkshire and on the south-west by Moffat in Dumfriesshire. Megget Stone lies on the western parish boundary, with Tweedsmuir.It is about 7 miles long north to south and about 6 miles wide with an area of 14,500 acres.The population of Megget in 1861 was 53 and in 1901 was 73. At the latest census (in 2011) the population of Megget was around 50.The parish of Megget derived its name from the river Megget, which took its name from the whey colour of its waters (Gaelic or old Welsh). Until 1891 it was part of Peeblesshire and thus part of Tweeddale, however “the water of Meggit is the only water in Tweeddale, that pays no tribute to Tweed; but runs from the south-east, some five miles, and ends its course in the bosom of St Mary Loch, and from thence, with Yarrow, watereth the wοόdy banks of the Forrest” (namely Ettrick Forest – the county of Selkirkshire).

— Wikipedia

Tadoussac

Tadoussac

Tadoussac (French pronunciation: ​[tadusak]) is a village in Quebec, Canada, at the confluence of the Saguenay and Saint Lawrence rivers. The indigenous Innu called the place Totouskak (plural for totouswk or totochak) meaning "bosom", probably in reference to the two round and sandy hills located on the west side of the village. According to other interpretations, it could also mean "place of lobsters", or "place where the ice is broken" (from the Innu shashuko). Although located in Innu territory, the post was also frequented by the Mi'kmaq people in the second half of the 16th century, who called it Gtatosag ("among the rocks"). Alternate spellings of Tadoussac over the centuries included Tadousac (17th and 18th centuries), Tadoussak, and Thadoyzeau (1550). Tadoussac was first visited by Europeans in 1535 and was established in 1599 when the first trading post in Canada was formed there, in addition to a permanent settlement being placed in the same area that the Grand Hotel is located today.

— Wikipedia

Ishmael

Ishmael

the son of Abraham and the handmaid Hagar, cast out of Abraham's household at 15; he became skilful with the bow, and founded a great nation, the Arabs; for the offering of Isaac on Moriah the Arabs substitute the offering of Ishmael on Arafat, near Mecca; Mahomet claimed descent from him; he gives name in modern life to a social outcast driven into antagonism to social arrangements.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Abrahamic

Abrahamic

pertaining to Abraham, the patriarch; as, the Abrachamic covenant

— Webster Dictionary

ical

ical

relating to the patriarch Abraham

— Webster Dictionary

Concubine

Concubine

a wife of inferior condition; a lawful wife, but not united to the man by the usual ceremonies, and of inferior condition. Such were Hagar and Keturah, the concubines of Abraham; and such concubines were allowed by the Roman laws. Their children were not heirs of their father

— Webster Dictionary

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. secular
  • B. cloistral
  • C. reclusive
  • D. secluded