Synonyms containing in abraham's bosom Page #8

We've found 461 synonyms:

Esau

Esau

Esau, in the Hebrew Bible, is the older son of Isaac. He is mentioned in the Book of Genesis, and by the minor prophets, Obadiah and Malachi. The New Testament later references him in St Paul's Letter to the Romans and in the Letter to the Hebrews. Esau is the progenitor of the Edomites and the twin brother of Jacob, the patriarch of the Israelites. Esau and Jacob were the sons of Isaac and Rebekah, and the grandsons of Abraham and Sarah. Of the twins, Esau was the first to be born with Jacob following. Isaac was sixty years old and Rebekah is believed to have been younger when the boys were born. The grandfather Abraham was still alive, being 160 years old at that time. Esau, a "man of the field" became a hunter who had "rough" qualities that distinguished him from his twin brother. Jacob was a shy or simple man, depending on the translation of the Hebrew word "Tam". Throughout Genesis, Esau is frequently shown as being supplanted by his younger twin Jacob.

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Plains of Abraham

Plains of Abraham

The Plains of Abraham is a historic area within The Battlefields Park in Quebec City, Quebec, that was originally grazing land, but became famous as the site of the Battle of the Plains of Abraham, which took place on 13 September 1759. Though the site was of historic significance, housing and minor industrial structures were still erected atop hundreds of acres of the fields. Only in 1908 was the land ceded to Quebec City, though administered by the specifically created and federally run National Battlefields Commission. The park is today used by 4 million visitors and tourists annually for sports, relaxation, outdoor concerts, and festivals.

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Parpi

Parpi

Parpi is a village in the Aragatsotn Province of Armenia. Within the village is a 5th-century church. The 5th- to 6th-century Armenian chronicler and historian Ghazar Parpetsi was born at Parpi. He is most prominent for writing a history of Armenia, History of Armenia, sometime in the early 6th century. Parpi is known to have had a brief visit during October 1734 by Abraham Kretatsi during the time while he was serving the Catholicos Abraham II. He wrote, "The next day, at my request, we went to Parpi and from there to Karbi, where we spent the night at the residences of Paron Khachatur and Paron Ohazar." The village is also mentioned in a 13th-century inscription on the southern wall of the Katoghike Church of the Astvatsnkal Monastery built between the 5th and 13th centuries. It reads, By the grace and mercy of God, I Kurd, Prince of Princes, son of the great Vache, and my wife Khorishah, daughter of Marzpan, built the Holy Katoghike for the memory of our souls. We have decorated it with every kind of precious ornament and offered the garden bought by us in Parpi, virgin land in Oshakan, a garden in Karbi, a villager, and three hostels, in the year 693/AD 1244.

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Land of Israel

Land of Israel

The Land of Israel is a name for the territory roughly corresponding to the area encompassed by the Southern Levant. The definition of the limits of this territory varies between biblical passages, specifically Genesis 15, Exodus 23, Numbers 34 and Ezekiel 47. Elsewhere in the Bible, this land is often referred as "from Dan to Beersheba". The boundaries of the Land of Israel are different from the borders of historical Israelite kingdoms. The Bar Kokhba state, the Herodian Kingdom, the Hasmonean Kingdom, and the United Kingdom of Israel ruled lands with similar but not identical boundaries. The current State of Israel also has similar but not identical boundaries. The Jewish religious belief that the area is a God-given inheritance of the Jewish people is based on the Torah, especially the books of Genesis and Exodus, as well as the Prophets. According to the Book of Genesis, the land was promised by God to the descendants of Abraham through his son Isaac and to the Israelites, descendants of Jacob, Abraham's grandson. A reading of the text suggests that the biblical promise is one of the biblical covenants between God and the Israelites. This belief is not shared by most adherents of replacement theology, who hold the view that the Old Testament prophecies were superseded by the coming of Jesus. Christian Zionists dispute this assertion and state that one cannot separate the Old and New Testaments as God himself doesn't change. The promise is thus still binding.

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Even If

Even If

"Even If" sung by Andy Abraham, was the United Kingdom's entry for the Eurovision Song Contest 2008, Belgrade, Serbia. It was released on 19 May 2008, stated by his official website. The song is an up-tempo soul type song written by Andy Abraham, Paul Wilson and Andy Watkins. According to betting site PaddyPower.com, the odds for the song to win the Eurovision Song Contest 2008 were 100/1. In the end, the song reached joint last place at 23rd, with 14 points. The single reached #67 on the UK Singles Chart. The song was succeeded as United Kingdom representative at the 2009 contest by Jade Ewen with "It's My Time". The UK's 2009 performance was a significant improvement on 2008's last-place finish, with Jade Ewen coming 5th in Moscow.

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Breguet

Breguet

Breguet is a Swiss manufacturer of luxury watches, founded by Abraham-Louis Breguet in Paris in 1775. Currently part of The Swatch Group, its timepieces are now produced in the Vallée de Joux in Switzerland. It is one of the oldest surviving watch-making establishments and is the pioneer of numerous watch-making technologies, the most notable being the tourbillon, invented by Abraham-Louis Breguet. It also produced the first wrist watch in 1810. Breguet introduced a line of writing instruments as a tribute to writers who mention or feature Breguet watches in their works. Breguet watches are often easily recognized for their coin-edge cases, guilloché dials and blue pomme hands.

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Aram-Naharaim

Aram-Naharaim

Aram-Naharaim is a region that is mentioned five times in the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament. It is commonly identified with Nahrima mentioned in three tablets of the Amarna correspondence as a geographical description of the kingdom of Mitanni. In Genesis, it is used somewhat interchangeably with the names Paddan Aram and Haran to denote the place where Abraham stayed briefly with his father Terah's family after leaving Ur of the Chaldees, while en route to Canaan, and the place to which later patriarchs obtained wives, rather than marry daughters of Canaan. Paddan Aram refers to the part of Aram-Naharaim along the upper Euphrates, while Haran is mainly identified with the ancient city of Harran on the Balikh River. According to one rabbinical Jewish tradition, the birthplace of Abraham was also situated in Aram-Naharaim.

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Gettysburg Address

Gettysburg Address

The Gettysburg Address is a speech by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, one of the best-known in American history. It was delivered by Lincoln during the American Civil War, on the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated those of the Confederacy at the Battle of Gettysburg. Abraham Lincoln's carefully crafted address, secondary to other presentations that day, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history. In just over two minutes, Lincoln reiterated the principles of human equality espoused by the Declaration of Independence and proclaimed the Civil War as a struggle for the preservation of the Union sundered by the secession crisis, with "a new birth of freedom," that would bring true equality to all of its citizens. Lincoln also redefined the Civil War as a struggle not just for the Union, but also for the principle of human equality. Beginning with the now-iconic phrase "Four score and seven years ago," referring to the Declaration of Independence, written at the start of the American Revolution in 1776, Lincoln examined the founding principles of the United States in the context of the Civil War, and memorialized the sacrifices of those who gave their lives at Gettysburg and extolled virtues for the listeners to ensure the survival of America's representative democracy, that "government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."

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Misquotation

Misquotation

Misquotation is incorrect attribution of the author of a quotation or inaccurate reproduction of the quotation itself. For example, in a speech George Bush said "As Abraham Lincoln said, "Here I stand — 'warts and all'." This was not said by Abraham Lincoln but is a composite of separate quotations by Martin Luther and Oliver Cromwell. Many quotations are routinely incorrect or attributed to the wrong authors, and quotations from obscure or unknown writers are often attributed to far more famous writers. Examples of this are Winston Churchill, to whom many political quotations of uncertain origin are attributed, and Oscar Wilde, to whom anonymous humorous quotes are sometimes attributed. Deliberate misquotation is also common, though this often goes unnoticed, usually because the misquotation is better known or because the misquotation better fits a situation. For example, the Star Trek catchphrase "Beam me up, Scotty" did not appear in that form in the original series—likewise, the famous Dirty Harry quotation "Are you feeling lucky, punk?" is actually a rewording of the original dialogue: "You've got to ask yourself one question: 'Do I feel lucky?' Well, do ya punk?"

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Peter Cartwright

Peter Cartwright

Peter Cartwright was an American Methodist revivalist and politician in Illinois. Born in Amherst County, now Nelson County, Virginia at the intersection of State Routes 647 and 722 between Findlay Mountain and Purgatory Swamp. A Virginia Historical marker is on Route 56 beyond Lovingston towards Shipman, where it joins Rt 647, Cartwright was a missionary who helped start the Second Great Awakening and personally baptized twelve thousand converts. He settled in Illinois In 1828 and 1832 he was elected to the lower house of the Illinois General Assembly. In 1832 he was one of four candidates elected in a field of thirteen. He received more votes than another candidate, a Kentucky store clerk and rail splitter named Abraham Lincoln. He came in eighth. “I was beaten”, Lincoln wrote, “the only time I have even been beaten by the people.” He lost to Abraham Lincoln for a United States Congress seat in 1846. As a Methodist circuit rider, Cartwright rode circuits in Tennessee and Kentucky. His Autobiography made him nationally prominent.

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Patriarchs

Patriarchs

The Patriarchs of the Bible, when narrowly defined, are Abraham, his son Isaac, and Isaac's son Jacob, also named Israel, the ancestor of the Israelites. These three figures are referred to collectively as the patriarchs of Judaism, and the period in which they lived is known as the patriarchal age. They play significant roles in Hebrew scripture during and following their lifetimes. They are used as a significant marker by God in revelations and promises, and continue to play important roles in the Abrahamic faiths. More widely, the term Patriarchs can be used to refer to the twenty ancestor-figures between Abraham and Adam. The first ten of these are called the Antediluvian patriarchs, because they came before the Flood. Judaism and Islam hold that the patriarchs and their primary wives – Sarah, Rebekah, and Leah and Rachel –, are entombed at Machpelah, a site held holy by Jews, Muslims, and Christians.

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John George Nicolay

John George Nicolay

John George Nicolay was an American biographer, secretary of US President Abraham Lincoln and member of the German branch of the Nicolay family. In 1838, he immigrated to the United States with his father, attended school in Cincinnati. He later went to Illinois, where he edited the Pike County Free Press at Pittsfield, and became a political power in the state. Then he became assistant to the secretary of state of Illinois. While in this position, he met Abraham Lincoln and became his devoted adherent. In 1861, Lincoln appointed Nicolay to be his private secretary, which was the first official act of his new administration. Nicolay served in this capacity until Lincoln's death in 1865. Shortly before the president's assassination, Lincoln appointed Nicolay to a diplomatic post in France. After the death of the President, Nicolay became United States Consul at Paris, France. For some time after his return to the United States, he edited the Chicago Republican. He was Marshal of the United States Supreme Court. In 1881, Nicolay wrote The Outbreak of the Rebellion.

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Lot in Islam

Lot in Islam

Lut, known as Lot in the Old Testament is a prophet of God in the Quran. He also appears in the Bible, but the biblical stories of Lot are not entirely accepted within Islam. According to Islamic tradition, Lot lived in Ur and was the son of Haran and nephew of Abraham. He migrated with Abraham to Canaan. He was commissioned as a prophet to the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah. His story is used to demonstrate Islam's disapproval of rape and homosexuality. He was commanded by God to go to the land of Sodom and Gomorrah to preach to his people on monotheism and to stop them from their lustful and violent acts. According to both the Quran and the Hebrew Bible, Lot's messages were ignored by the inhabitants and Sodom and Gomorrah were subsequently destroyed. They cannot be exactly located, but it may be supposed that they were somewhere in the plain east of the Dead Sea.²³2425 26 ¶ But his wife looked back from behind him, and she became a pillar of salt. Note that Lut's people are the people to whom he is sent on a mission. He was not one of their own brethren, as was Salih or Shu'aib. But he looked upon his people as his "brethren". The Qur'an says that Lot is a prophet, and holds that all prophets were examples of moral and spiritual rectitude, so the report of Lot's drunkenness and incest is considered to be false.

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Self-actualization

Self-actualization

Self-actualization is a term that has been used in various psychology theories, often in slightly different ways. The term was originally introduced by the organismic theorist Kurt Goldstein for the motive to realize one's full potential. Expressing one's creativity, quest for spiritual enlightenment, pursuit of knowledge, and the desire to give to society are examples of self-actualization. In Goldstein's view, it is the organism's master motive, the only real motive: "the tendency to actualize itself as fully as possible is the basic drive... the drive of self-actualization." Carl Rogers similarly wrote of "the curative force in psychotherapy - man's tendency to actualize himself, to become his potentialities... to express and activate all the capacities of the organism." The concept was brought most fully to prominence in Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory as the final level of psychological development that can be achieved when all basic and mental needs are essentially fulfilled and the "actualization" of the full personal potential takes place, although he adapted this viewpoint later on in life, and saw it more flexibly. As Abraham Maslow noted, the basic needs of humans must be met before a person can achieve self-actualization - the need to be good, to be fully alive and to find meaning in life. Research shows that when people live lives that are different from their true nature and capabilities, they are less likely to be happy than those whose goals and lives match. For example, someone who has inherent potential to be a great artist or teacher may never realize his/her talents if their energy is focused on attaining the basic needs of humans.

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Chest

Chest

The chest is a part of the anatomy of humans and various other animals. It is sometimes referred to as the thorax or the bosom.

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A synonym for "subterranean"
  • A. surface
  • B. overt
  • C. ulterior
  • D. overhead