Synonyms containing jailhouse lawyer

We've found 515 synonyms:

Jailhouse lawyer

Jailhouse lawyer

Jailhouse lawyer is a colloquial term in North American English to refer to an inmate in a jail or other prison who, though usually never having practiced law nor having any formal legal training, informally assists other inmates in legal matters relating to their sentence or to their conditions in prison. Sometimes, he or she also assists other inmates in civil matters of a legal nature. The term can also refer to a prison inmate who is representing themselves in legal matters relating to their sentence. The important role that jailhouse lawyers play in the criminal justice system has been recognized by the U.S. Supreme Court, which has held that jailhouse lawyers must be permitted to assist illiterate inmates in filing petitions for postconviction relief unless the state provides some reasonable alternative. Many states in the U.S. have Jailhouse Lawyer Statutes, some of which exempt inmates acting as jailhouse lawyers from the licensing requirements imposed on other attorneys when they are helping indigent inmates with legal matters. Cases brought by inmates have also called attention to the need for jailhouse lawyers to have access to law libraries.

— Freebase

Philadelphia lawyer

Philadelphia lawyer

Philadelphia Lawyer is a term to describe a lawyer who knows the most detailed and minute points of law or is an exceptionally competent lawyer. Its first usage dates back to 1788. Alternatively, "the ultimate in crooked lawyers". Philadelphia-based Colonial American lawyer Andrew Hamilton, a lawyer best known for his legal victory on behalf of printer and newspaper publisher John Peter Zenger, is believed to have inspired the "Philadelphia lawyer" term. This 1735 decision helped to establish that truth is a defense to an accusation of libel.

— Freebase

Bush lawyer

Bush lawyer

Bush lawyer is a common name of a group of climbing blackberry plants that are found in New Zealand, many of them rampant forest vines. The Māori language name of the plant is tātarāmoa. Tātaramoa or bush lawyer has hooked thorns that snag clothing and rip or prick the skin. The colloquial English name is often said to have been given because once this thorny plant becomes attached to you it will not let you go until it has drawn blood: Some overseas trampers might not understand or appreciate the common name of Rubus cissoides, but North Americans certainly do. In New Zealand the thorny vine is best known as bush lawyer. Found throughout the country up to 1000m, the plant has hand-shaped leaves with three to five toothed 'fingers', white flowers and a yellowish-red fruit. The berry is shaped like a small blackberry and was once used by early Europeans to make jams and jellies. But the plant's most noticeable feature is its thorns. The backward-pointing prickles on the stems help the vine climb to the open canopy of a forest but also snare unwary trampers who stray from the track. You'll immediately know bush lawyer when you encounter it as the thorns will painfully scrape across your bare thighs or arms, quickly drawing blood. And, like any good American lawyer, once it gets a hold of you, it doesn't let go easily.

— Freebase

Pettifogger

Pettifogger

a lawyer who deals in petty cases; an attorney whose methods are mean and tricky; an inferior lawyer

— Webster Dictionary

miranda rule

Miranda rule

the rule that police (when interrogating you after an arrest) are obliged to warn you that anything you say may be used as evidence and to read you your constitutional rights (the right to a lawyer and the right to remain silent until advised by a lawyer)

— Princeton's WordNet

Tush

Tush

"Tush" was the only single from ZZ Top's fourth album Fandango!. It reached number 20 on the pop chart. The song is a twelve-bar blues in the key of G. The recording was produced by Bill Ham, and recorded and mixed by Terry Manning. The title is a double entendre, referring both to slang for buttocks, and slang for "luxurious" or "lavish", according to a 1985 interview with Dusty Hill in Spin Magazine. The word "tush" is pronounced in the song in such a way that it rhymes with the word "rush" resulting in a mondegreen that has some listeners believing the word is "touch" if they haven't read the lyrics. It is also one of the ZZ Top songs on Fandango! sung by bassist Dusty Hill, the others being "Jailhouse Rock", "Balinese", and "Heard It on the X". The song was named the 67th best hard rock song of all time by VH1.

— Freebase

Lawyer

Lawyer

A lawyer, according to Black's Law Dictionary, is "a person learned in the law; as an attorney, counsel or solicitor; a person who is practicing law." Law is the system of rules of conduct established by the sovereign government of a society to correct wrongs, maintain the stability of political and social authority, and deliver justice. Working as a lawyer involves the practical application of abstract legal theories and knowledge to solve specific individualized problems, or to advance the interests of those who retain lawyers to perform legal services. The role of the lawyer varies significantly across legal jurisdictions, and so it can be treated here in only the most general terms.

— Freebase

Direct examination

Direct examination

The Direct Examination or Examination-in-Chief is one stage in the process of adducing evidence from witnesses in a court of law. Direct examination is the questioning of a witness by the party who called him or her, in a trial. Direct examination is usually performed to elicit evidence in support of facts which will satisfy a required element of a party's claim or defense. In direct examination, one is generally prohibited from asking leading questions. This prevents a lawyer from feeding answers to a favorable witness. An exception to this rule occurs if one side has called a witness, but it is either understood, or soon becomes plain, that the witness is hostile to the questioner's side of the controversy. The lawyer may then ask the court to declare the person he or she has called to the stand a hostile witness. If the court does so, the lawyer may thereafter ply the witness with leading questions during direct examination. The techniques of direct examination are taught in courses on Trial Advocacy. Each direct examination is integrated with the overall case strategy through either a theme and theory or, with more advanced strategies, a line of effort.

— Freebase

Andrew Hamilton

Andrew Hamilton

Andrew Hamilton was a Scottish lawyer in the Thirteen Colonies, where he finally settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was best known for his legal victory on behalf of the printer and newspaper publisher John Peter Zenger. This 1735 decision in New York helped to establish that truth is a defense to an accusation of libel. His eloquent defense concluded with saying that the press has "a liberty both of exposing and opposing tyrannical power by speaking and writing truth." His success in this case has been said to have inspired the term, "Philadelphia lawyer," meaning a particularly adept and clever attorney, as in "It would take a Philadelphia lawyer to get him off." His estate in Philadelphia, known as Bush Hill, was used for the vice-president's house during the years that the city was the temporary capital of the United States.

— Freebase

Rules lawyer

Rules lawyer

A rules lawyer is a participant in a rules-based environment who attempts to use the letter of the law without reference to the spirit, usually in order to gain an advantage within that environment. The term is commonly used in wargaming and role playing game communities, often pejoratively, as the "rules lawyer" is seen as an impediment to moving the game forward. The habit of players to argue in a legal fashion over rule implementation was noted early on in the history of Dungeons and Dragons. Rules lawyers are one of the "player styles" covered in Dungeon Master for Dummies. The rules of the game Munchkin include various parodies of rules lawyer behavior.

— Freebase

Client

Client

klī′ent, n. one who employs a lawyer: a dependent.—n. Clī′entage, the whole number of one's clients: the client's relation to the patron.—adj. Clīent′al.—ns. Clī′entele, a following: the whole connection of a lawyer, shopkeeper, &c.; Clī′entship. [L. cliens, for cluens, one who hears or listens (to advice), from cluēre, to hear.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Heenan

Heenan

Heenan is the name of Bobby Heenan (1944-2017), American wrestler Catherine Heenan, American journalist Daniel Heenan (b. 1981), Australian rugby player Eric Heenan, Australian lawyer George Heenan (1855–1912), New Zealand cricketer John Heenan (disambiguation), several persons Katie Heenan (b. 1985), American gymnast Maurice Heenan, New Zealand lawyer Patrick Heenan (disambiguation), several persons Peter Heenan (1875–1948), Canadian politician Roy Heenan (b. 1935), Canadian lawyer

— Wikipedia

Malpractice

Malpractice

Failure of a professional person, a physician or lawyer, to render proper services through reprehensible ignorance or negligence or through criminal intent, especially when injury or loss follows. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Advice Company

Advice Company

Advice Company has been a pioneer legal information provider since going online in 1995. Its www.FreeAdvice.com has long been one of the most visited consumer legal information sites, with professionally prepared legal content in over 100 legal topics, very active Forums, and a free Ask a Lawyer service. It expanded its legal content offering to the insurance sector in 2009. Advice Company also created one of the first online lawyer directories of consumer lawyers, now at www.AttorneyPages.com, and it created the first and most visited Expert Witness directory, www.ExpertPages.com. Advice Company sold its home improvement affiliate DoItYourself.com to Internet Brands in 2007.

— CrunchBase

Scott, Sir Walter

Scott, Sir Walter

the great romancer, born in Edinburgh, through both father and mother of Scottish Border blood; his father, a lawyer, a man "who passed from the cradle to the grave without making an enemy or losing a friend," his mother a little kindly woman, full of most vivid memories, awakening an interest in him to which he owed much; was a healthy child, but from teething and other causes lost the use of his right limb when 18 months old, which determined, to a marked extent, the course of his life; spent many of the months of his childhood in the country, where he acquired that affection for all natural objects which never left him, and a kindliness of soul which all the lower animals that approached him were quick to recognise; he was from the first home-bred, and to realise the like around his own person was his fondest dream, and if he failed, as it chanced he did, his vexation was due not to the material loss it involved, but to the blight it shed on his home life and the disaster on his domestic relationships; his school training yielded results of the smallest account to his general education, and a writer of books himself, he owed less to book-knowledge than his own shrewd observation; he proceeded from the school (the High School, it was) at 15 to his father's office and classes at the University, and at both he continued to develop his own bent more than the study of law or learning; at his sixteenth year the bursting of a blood-vessel prostrated him in bed and enforced a period of perfect stillness, but during this time he was able to prosecute sundry quiet studies, and laid up in his memory great stores of knowledge, for his mind was of that healthy quality which assimilated all that was congenial to it and let all that did not concern it slip idly through, achieving thereby his greatest victory, that of becoming an altogether whole man. Professionally he was a lawyer, and a good lawyer, but the duties of his profession were not his chief interest, and though he received at length a sheriffship worth £300 a year, and a clerkship to the court worth £1500, he early turned his mind to seek promotion elsewhere, and chose a literary career. His first literary efforts were translations in verse from the German, but his first great literary success was the publication, in 1802, of "The Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border," and in this he first gave evidence both of the native force and bent of his genius; it gave the keynote of all that subsequently proceeded from his pen. This was followed the same year by "Cadzow Castle," a poem instinct with military ardour, and this by "The Lay of the Last Minstrel" in 1805; the first poem which gained him popular favour, by "Marmion" in 1808, and by "The Lord of the Isles" in 1814. Much as the rise of Scott's fame was owing to his poetical works, it is on the ground of his prose writings, as the freest and fullest exhibition of his genius, that it is now mainly founded. The period of his productivity in this line extended over 18 years in all, commencing with the year 1814. This was the year of the publication of "Waverley," which was followed by that of "Guy Mannering," "The Antiquary," "Rob Roy," "Old Mortality," and "The Heart of Midlothian" in the year 1819, when he was smitten down by an illness, the effects of which was seen in his after-work. "The Bride of Lammermoor," "Ivanhoe," "The Monastery," "The Abbot," "Kenilworth," and "The Pirate" belong to the years that succeeded that illness, and all more or less witness to its sorrowful effects, of which last "The Abbot" and "The Monastery" are reckoned the best, as still illustrating the "essential powers" of Scott, to which may be added "Redgauntlet" and "The Fortunes of Nigel," characterised by Ruskin as "quite noble ones," together with "Quentin Durward" and "Woodstock," as "both of high value." Sir Walter's own life was, in its inner essence, an even-flowing one, for there were in it no crises such as to require a reversal of the poles of it, and a spiritual new birth, with crucifixion of the old nature, and hence it is easily divisible, as it has been divided throughout, into the three natural periods of growth, activity, and death. His active life, which ranges from 1796 to 1826, lay in picturing things and traditions of things as in youth, a 25 years' period of continuous crescent expansiveness, he had learned to view them, and his slow death was the result, not of mere weariness in working, but of the adverse circumstances that thwarted and finally wrecked the one unworthy ambition that had fatally taken possession of his heart. Of Scott Ruskin says, "What good Scott had in him to do, I find no words full enough to express...

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

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