Synonyms containing k street

We've found 2,884 synonyms:

Street

Street

strēt, n. a road in a town lined with houses, broader than a lane: those who live in a street: the part of the street for vehicles: the body of brokers.—ns. Street′age, toll for the use of a street; Street′car, a passenger-car on the streets of a city, drawn by horses, cable traction, or electricity; Street′-door, the door of a house which opens upon a street; Street′-rail′road, a railroad or tramway constructed on a public street; Street′-sweep′er, one who, or that which, sweeps the streets clean; Street′-walk′er, a whore who prowls about the streets; Street′-ward, an officer who formerly took care of the streets; Street′-way, the roadway. [A.S. strǽt (Dut. straat, Ger. strasse, It. strada)—L. strata (via), a paved (way), from sternĕre, stratum, to strew.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Basin Street

Basin Street

Basin Street or Rue Bassin in French, is a street in New Orleans, Louisiana. It parallels Rampart Street one block lakeside, or inland, from the boundary of the French Quarter, running from Canal Street down 5 blocks past Saint Louis Cemetery. It currently then turns lakewards, flowing into Orleans Avenue. The name comes from the turning basin of the Carondelet Canal formerly located on the street, where it now turns on to Orleans by the Municipal Auditorium. In the late 19th century and early 20th century railroad tracks paralleled the Canal and then turned on to Basin Street, running up the "neutral ground" (as street medians are called locally) to one of the city's main railroad depots on Canal Street. At one time one of the finest residential streets in the city, it became a red light district around 1870. From 1897 through World War I, the back side of Basin Street was the front of the Storyville red light district, with a line of high end saloons and mansions devoted to music.After Storyville's closure, Basin Street was temporarily renamed North Saratoga. The majority of Storyville was demolished and replaced with the Iberville Projects. Basin Street formerly continued on the other side of Canal Street to Common Street, today known as Elk Place, which after two blocks becomes Loyola Avenue on the upper side of Common Street. The equivalent street paralleling Rampart one block back on the other side of Louis Armstrong Park in the Treme neighborhood is Saint Claude. Basin Street was commemorated in the song Basin Street Blues published by Spencer Williams in 1926 and recorded by Louis Armstrong in 1929; the hundreds of recordings of this jazz standard since include a version by Miles Davis in 1963. There is a series of monuments on the neutral ground of Basin Street, including statues of Simón Bolívar, Benito Juárez, and Francisco Morazán, and a metal sign commemorating Storyville.

— Wikipedia

Street photography

Street photography

Street photography, also sometimes called candid photography, is photography conducted for art or enquiry that features unmediated chance encounters and random incidents within public places. Although there is a difference between street and candid photography, it is usually subtle with most street photography being candid in nature and some candid photography being classifiable as street photography. Street photography does not necessitate the presence of a street or even the urban environment. Though people usually feature directly, street photography might be absent of people and can be of an object or environment where the image projects a decidedly human character in facsimile or aesthetic. The street photographer can be seen as an extension of the flâneur, an observer of the streets (who was often a writer or artist).Framing and timing can be key aspects of the craft with the aim of some street photography being to create images at a decisive or poignant moment. Street photography can focus on people and their behavior in public, thereby also recording people's history. This motivation entails having also to navigate or negotiate changing expectations and laws of privacy, security and property. In this respect the street photographer is similar to social documentary photographers or photojournalists who also work in public places, but with the aim of capturing newsworthy events; any of these photographers' images may capture people and property visible within or from public places. The existence of services like Google Street View, recording public space at a massive scale, and the burgeoning trend of self-photography (selfies), further complicate ethical issues reflected in attitudes to street photography. Much of what is regarded, stylistically and subjectively, as definitive street photography was made in the era spanning the end of the 19th century through to the late 1970s, a period which saw the emergence of portable cameras that enabled candid photography in public places.

— Wikipedia

Baker Street

Baker Street

Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid the street out in the 18th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lives at a fictional 221B Baker Street address. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises. Baker St is a busy thoroughfare, lying in postcode areas NW1/W1 and forming part of the A41 there. It runs south from Regent's Park, the intersection with Park Road, parallel to Gloucester Place, intersecting Marylebone Road, Portman Square and Wigmore Street. At the intersection with Wigmore St, Baker St turns into Orchard Street, which ends when it intersects with Oxford Street. After Portman Square the road continues as Orchard Street. Selfridges, a landmark department store is on the corner of Orchard Street and Oxford Street. The street is served by the London Underground by Baker Street tube station, one of the world's oldest surviving underground stations. Next door is Transport for London's lost property office. A significant robbery of a branch of Lloyds Bank took place on Baker Street in 1971.

— Freebase

Bay Street

Bay Street

Bay Street is a major thoroughfare in Downtown Toronto. It is the centre of Toronto's Financial District and is often used by metonymy to refer to Canada's financial industry since succeeding Montreal's St. James Street in that role in the 1970s. Bay Street stretches from Queens Quay in the south to Davenport Road in the north. The original section of Bay Street ran only as far north as Queen Street West. Sections north of Queen Street were renamed Bay Street as several other streets were consolidated and several gaps filled in to create a new thoroughfare in the 1920s. The largest of these streets, Terauley Street, ran from Queen Street West to Grenville Street. At these two points, there is a curve in Bay Street. "Bay Street banker," as in the phrase "cold as a Bay Street banker's heart," was a term of opprobrium especially among Prairie farmers who feared that financial interests were hurting them. Within the legal profession, the term Bay Street is also used colloquially to refer to the large, full-service business law firms of Toronto.

— Freebase

Street or road name

Street or road name

A street name or odonym is an identifying name given to a street. The street name usually forms part of the address. Buildings are often given numbers along the street to further help identify them. Names are often given in a two-part form: an individual name known as the specific, and an indicator of the type of street, known as the generic. Examples include "Main Road", "Fleet Street" and "Park Avenue". The type of street stated, however, can sometimes be misleading: a street named "Park Avenue" need not have the characteristics of an avenue in the generic sense. Some streets are given a name without a street type designation. The Mall, for example, is the name of various famous streets around the world. A street name can also include a direction especially in cities with a grid-numbering system. Examples include "E Roosevelt Boulevard" and "14th Street NW". These directions are often used to differentiate two sections of a street. Other qualifiers may be used for that purpose as well. Examples: upper/lower, old/new, or adding "extension".

— Freebase

High Street

High Street

High Street is a metonym for the generic name of the primary business street of towns or cities, especially in the United Kingdom. It is usually a focal point for shops and shopkeepers in city centres, and is most often used in reference to retailing. The equivalent in the United States, Canada and Ireland is Main Street, a term also used in smaller towns and villages in Scotland and parts of rural Australia. In Jamaica, North East England and some sections of Canada and the United States, the main commercial district is Front Street. In Cornwall, some places in Devon and some places in the north of England, the equivalent is Fore Street; in some parts of the UK Market Street is also used, although sometimes this may be a different area where street markets are currently centred. In Canada, King Street and Queen Street are often major streets; "rue Principale" as the literal French language equivalent of "Main Street" is frequently used and "a village where the main street is still Main Street" a phrase used in respect for small towns. The Dutch equivalent is Hoogstraat, of which examples are found in cities such as Brussels, Amsterdam, Antwerp, Bruges, Rotterdam and many towns.

— Freebase

Street artist

Street artist

A street artist is someone who creates and/or sells their art or craft in public for the pleasure of passers-by. Some people use the term 'street artist' more broadly and also refer to people involved in busking, such as musicians who sing and/or play instruments, acrobats, jugglers, living statues, performers of street theatre, artists who use pastel crayons to copy famous paintings onto pavements, as well as artists who sell their paintings, portraits, prints, and various crafts. While some street artists may support themselves by selling a physical commodity like a portrait on paper or a painting upon canvas, performers may encourage payment by having pedestrians show their appreciation by giving coins, usually into a hat or a can. Regardless of the accuracy of the likeness or excellence of the work, portrait artists usually consider payment mandatory - which is why some local governments consider it street trading and therefore work requiring a license. Street artists can be seen throughout the world. In some cities street artists will set up spontaneously wherever they like, but often run the risk of being arrested if municipal ordinances prohibit their display. However in other cities, street artists can be licensed within municipal street artist programs so they may legally sell their artwork. Frequently these municipal street artist programs will describe designated locations where licensed street artists are allowed to display, as well as regulate what they are allowed to sell in an attempt to allow only handmade items of the artist's creation and not the manufactured work of others. San Francisco, Berkeley, and Seattle are American cities that allow the regulation and legal display of street artists and their wares through municipal ordinances.

— Freebase

Guile

Guile

Guile is a character in Capcom's Street Fighter series of fighting games. He debuted as one of the original eight characters in 1991's Street Fighter II and appeared in the game's subsequent updates. In the games he is portrayed as a major in the United States Army who is seeking to avenge the death of his army buddy Charlie at the hands of the villainous dictator M. Bison. One of the most popular characters in the series, Guile has appeared in other Street Fighter games, including Street Fighter Alpha 3 and Street Fighter IV. He is also a playable character in various spin-off titles, such as the Street Fighter EX, Marvel vs. Capcom and SNK vs. Capcom series. In addition, Guile has appeared in other Street Fighter media. He is one of the main characters in the 1994 live action Street Fighter film and its animated spin-off, as well as Street Fighter II: The Animated Movie. The character has also been featured in various official comics and merchandise. Guile has been perceived as one of the more unique Street Fighter II characters in both appearance and gameplay. He is noted as having only two signature moves in the game, both of which are performed by first holding a direction on the joystick - the Sonic Boom and somersault. Guile has been well received, with the character often placing highly in various lists of the best Street Fighter characters of all time.

— Freebase

Street crime

Street crime

Street crime is a loose term for any criminal offense in a public place. The difference between street crime and white-collar crime is that street crime is often violence that occurs in a public area whereas white-collar crime is non-violent crime conducted by governments or private industries in order to gain financial stability. According to London's Metropolitan Police Force, "Robbery, often called 'mugging', and thefts from victims in the street where their property is snatched and the victim is not assaulted is also considered 'street crime'." Other examples of street crime include pickpocketing, the open illegal drugs trade, prostitution in the form of soliciting outside the law, the creation of graffiti and vandalism of public property, and assaults. As a generic term, street crime may include all of these, as well as offenses against private properties such as the stealing of hub caps. The majority of street crimes, as portrayed by various news media, are initiated by criminals seeking quick financial gains. However, they can also be carried out by organized individuals with a common goal of profiteering. On the other hand, not all of these instances are considered by the FBI to be "organized crimes" due to the random nature of the crimes themselves. The term "organized crime" does not often include organized street crimes.An organized crime is often a major business, consisting of many individuals associated for the common goal of criminal profiteering. In contrast, street crimes are normally conducted by hastily and loosely formed groups of individuals with the common goal of gaining illicit money through immediate criminal acts.

— Wikipedia

BNF

BNF

1. [techspeak] Acronym for Backus Normal Form (later retronymed to Backus-Naur Form because BNF was not in fact a normal form), a metasyntactic notation used to specify the syntax of programming languages, command sets, and the like. Widely used for language descriptions but seldom documented anywhere, so that it must usually be learned by osmosis from other hackers. Consider this BNF for a U.S. postal address:  <postal-address> ::= <name-part> <street-address> <zip-part>  <personal-part> ::= <name> | <initial> "."  <name-part> ::= <personal-part> <last-name> [<jr-part>] <EOL>                | <personal-part> <name-part>  <street-address> ::= [<apt>] <house-num> <street-name> <EOL>  <zip-part> ::= <town-name> "," <state-code> <ZIP-code> <EOL> This translates into English as: “A postal-address consists of a name-part, followed by a street-address part, followed by a zip-code part. A personal-part consists of either a first name or an initial followed by a dot. A name-part consists of either: a personal-part followed by a last name followed by an optional jr-part (Jr., Sr., or dynastic number) and end-of-line, or a personal part followed by a name part (this rule illustrates the use of recursion in BNFs, covering the case of people who use multiple first and middle names and/or initials). A street address consists of an optional apartment specifier, followed by a street number, followed by a street name. A zip-part consists of a town-name, followed by a comma, followed by a state code, followed by a ZIP-code followed by an end-of-line.” Note that many things (such as the format of a personal-part, apartment specifier, or ZIP-code) are left unspecified. These are presumed to be obvious from context or detailed somewhere nearby. See also parse. 2. Any of a number of variants and extensions of BNF proper, possibly containing some or all of the regexp wildcards such as * or +. In fact the example above isn't the pure form invented for the Algol-60 report; it uses [], which was introduced a few years later in IBM's PL/I definition but is now universally recognized. 3. In science-fiction fandom, a ‘Big-Name Fan’ (someone famous or notorious). Years ago a fan started handing out black-on-green BNF buttons at SF conventions; this confused the hacker contingent terribly.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Cheapside

Cheapside

a street, and surrounding district, in the City; links Newgate Street, Cornhill, Threadneedle Street, Poultry and Lomboard Street (and others)

— Wiktionary

Grub Street

Grub Street

Until the early 19th century, Grub Street was a street close to London's impoverished Moorfields district that ran from Fore Street east of St Giles-without-Cripplegate north to Chiswell Street. Famous for its concentration of impoverished 'hack writers', aspiring poets, and low-end publishers and booksellers, Grub Street existed on the margins of London's journalistic and literary scene. It was pierced along its length with narrow entrances to alleys and courts, many of which retained the names of early signboards. Its bohemian society was set amidst the impoverished neighbourhood's low-rent flophouses, brothels, and coffeehouses. According to Samuel Johnson's Dictionary, the term was "originally the name of a street... much inhabited by writers of small histories, dictionaries, and temporary poems, whence any mean production is called grubstreet." Johnson himself had lived and worked on Grub Street early in his career. The contemporary image of Grub Street was popularised by Alexander Pope in his Dunciad. The street name no longer exists, but Grub Street has since become a pejorative term for impoverished hack writers and writings of low literary value.

— Freebase

Carnaby Street

Carnaby Street

Carnaby Street is a pedestrianised shopping street in the City of Westminster, London, located in the Soho district, near Oxford Street and Regent Street. It is home to numerous fashion and lifestyle retailers, including a large number of independent fashion boutiques. Streets intersecting, or meeting with, Carnaby Street are, from south to north, Beak Street, Broadwick Street, Kingly Court, Ganton Street, Marlborough Court, Lowndes Court, Fouberts Place, Little Marlborough Street and Great Marlborough Street. The nearest London Underground station is Oxford Circus tube station.

— Freebase

Street party

Street party

A street party can mean any type of social event taking place on a road. In the UK, these have historically been held to commemorate momentous events, such as VE Day or the Queen's jubilees, with bunting dressing the street, and children playing in the street. An estimated 10 million people took part in street parties in 1977 for the Queen's Silver Jubilee. The British tradition seems to have begun after World War I as residents' own "peace teas" to celebrate the signing of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919. The tradition was boosted for the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton in April 2011 with about 1 million people joining in street parties. For the Queen's Diamond Jubilee in June 2012 about 2 million took part. Now street parties are held annually and at any time for residents to meet their neighbours in a traffic-free street in a private street party. Some 'street parties' are public events taking many forms. In the USA some are called a 'block party'. As a form of activism street parties are festive and/or artistic efforts to reclaim roadways as public space by large groups of people. They were made known in Western Europe and North America by the actions of Reclaim the Streets, a widespread "dis-organization" dedicated to reclaiming public space from automobiles and consumerism. In a somewhat different context, Poland's Orange Alternative staged festive protests to break the Communist government's monopoly on public life.

— Freebase

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