Synonyms containing kakheti

We've found 27 synonyms:

Kakheti

Kakheti

Kakheti (Georgian: კახეთი [kʼɑxɛtʰi]) is a region (mkhare) formed in the 1990s in eastern Georgia from the historical province of Kakheti and the small, mountainous province of Tusheti. Telavi is its capital. The region comprises eight administrative districts: Telavi, Gurjaani, Qvareli, Sagarejo, Dedoplistsqaro, Signagi, Lagodekhi and Akhmeta. Kakheti is bordered by the Russian Federation (Dagestan and Chechnya) to the northeast, Azerbaijan to the southeast, and Mtskheta-Mtianeti and Kvemo Kartli to the west. Kakheti has a strong linguistic and cultural identity, since its ethnographic subgroup of Kakhetians speak Kakhetian dialect. The Georgian David Gareja monastery complex is partially located in this province and is subject to a border dispute between Georgian and Azerbaijani authorities. Kakheti is a popular destination in Georgia, the main tourist spots are Tusheti, Gremi, Signagi, Kvetra, Bodbe, Lagodekhi Protected Areas and Alaverdi Monastery. The region produces wines in micro-regions of Telavi and Kvareli.

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Sagarejo

Sagarejo

Sagarejo (Georgian: საგარეჯო) is a town in Kakheti, Georgia. It is situated 58 kilometres (36 mi) east of Georgia’s capital, Tbilisi, and has the population of 10,871 (2014 census). It serves as an administrative center of the Sagarejo district. The town is traditionally considered a chief settlement of the Gare-Kakheti area (Outer Kakheti). The settlement is first mentioned in written records in the 11th century under the name of Tvali, literally meaning "an eye". Later, it came to be known as Sagarejo, i.e., "of Gareja", indicating that the area was owned by the David Gareja monastery. It acquired the town’s status in 1962. The fortified ruins of the ancient Ninotsminda Cathedral are located near Sagarejo.

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Abuletisdze

Abuletisdze

Abuletisdze (Georgian: აბულეთისძე) was a Georgian noble family – eristavs – with its most prominent members in the 12th and 13th century. The family held appanages in the valleys of Aragvi and Tedzami in the eastern province of Kakheti. The dynastic name Abuletidze (literally, "sons/descendants of Abulet") is derived from a male name Abulet. A person with this name appears as a commander under the Georgian king David IV (r. 1089-1125). He was among those nobles who recovered the fortress of Samshvilde from Seljuk Turks in 1110. Later, Abulet was a governor of Ani in 1124. He is last heard of in 1130. The Abuletisdze’s loyalty to the crown was not permanent, however. In the early 12th century, they were among the most powerful vassals and rivals of the kings of Georgia. Thus, already in the reign of David IV, Dzagan Abuletisdze is reported to have defied the royal authority, but was eventually to take refuge at the Shio-Mghvime Monastery which surrendered him to the king. Dzagan’s brother Modistos was a catholicos of the Georgian Orthodox Church, and was removed from this position by the same king.We next hear of Abulet’s son Ivane and grandson Kirkish (Tirkash) who served as the commanders of Georgian troops in Armenia, but subsequently plotted the murder of King Demetrius I, probably to place the king's half-brother Vakhtang on the throne. The king was timely warned and survived. He had Ivane murdered in 1132, while Kirkash fled to the Seljukid sultan of the Shah-Armenid state centered at Akhlat. The sultan enfeoffed him with Arsharunik whence he launched several raids into Georgia. Kirkish was eventually captured and cast into prison by Demetrius. When Demetrius was temporarily overthrown by his son David V, was restored to favor and granted the office of amirspasalar of which the rival Orbeli clan was dispossessed by the new king. Demetrius, once restored to the throne shortly thereafter, again gave the post to the Orbeli. Yet, the members of this family remained among the high nobility of Georgia, and were titled as eristavt-eristavs. One of them, Dzagan featured prominently in the Mongol capture of Baghdad in 1258, and returned with a substantial wealth of booty through which he acquired the village of Angroini and donated it to the Shio-Mghvime Monastery. Later in the 13th century, the family went in decline. By 1405, their fiefdom in Kakheti had passed to a branch of the Abazasdze.

— Wikipedia

Jorjadze

Jorjadze

Jorjadze (Georgian: ჯორჯაძე) is a Georgian noble family. It is considered by a genealogical tradition to have been of Caucasian Albanian origin, settled in the southern Georgian province of Meskheti in 980 and removed to Kakheti in eastern Georgia in 1466. The family was elevated to a princely dignity by the kings of Kakheti and granted the office of mouravi (palatine) of Gremi, and of Eniseli, the latter being hereditary in the line. Under Russian rule, the Jorjadzes were recognized as princes of the Russian Empire according to the decrees of 1829 and 1850.Presently, there are 154 Jorjadze family members in Georgia.There is one street named after Jorjadze in the capital of Georgia, Tbilisi.

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Chavchavadze

Chavchavadze

The Chavchavadze (Georgian: ჭავჭავაძე) is a Georgian noble family, formerly a princely one (tavadi). The family is first attested in the 15th century, during the reign of Alexander I of Georgia. By the time of Leon of Kakheti they appear in the province of Kakheti (1529, according to Prince Ioann of Georgia), where they produced two lines: one in Telavi and Tsinandali; another in Qvareli and Shildi. Both these lines were elevated to a princely dignity under the kings Erekle I (1680s) and Constantine II (1726), respectively. The Chavchavadze family, with its head Prince Garsevan, came to much prominence under the king Erekle II later in the 18th century, and continued to play an important role in Georgia during the Imperial Russian rule. They were confirmed in their rank by the Tsar’s decrees of 1825, 1828, 1829, and 1850. On 4 July 1853, a small party under Ghazi Muhammad (the son of Murid leader, Imam Shamil) kidnapped Prince Chavchavadze's wife and sister-in-law, Princess Orbeliani, together with their children and some others. The princess was exchanged for Shamil's son, Jamalu'd-din and 40,000 roubles on 10 March 1855.

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Diasamidze

Diasamidze

Diasamidze (Georgian: დიასამიძე) was a Georgian noble family known from 1443.The family held a fiefdom around Aspindza in Samtskhe (southern part of the Georgian Kingdom), and later acquired the former possessions of the houses of Abuserisdze and Khursidze. After the fragmentation of the Kingdom of Georgia, they allied with the kings of Kartli, namely Luarsab I in 1548, in their effort to prevent Samtskhe from being lost to the Safavid dynasty of Iran. In 1553, the shah of Iran, Tahmasp I, retaliated with the crackdown on the family, deporting several of its members to Iran. Later, between 1576 and 1578, the Diasamidze conspired against the Jakeli, a ruling house of Samtskhe, which eventually surrendered the province to the Ottoman Empire in 1578. These changes forced several members of the family to remove to Kartli and Kakheti at the end of the 16th century. During the 16th and 17th century, the line in Kartli frequently held the offices of Chief Bailiff of Mtskheta, Catholicos of Kartli, and abbot of the Monastery of the Holy Cross of Mtskheta; while the line in Kakheti were active at the Bodbe Monastery. In the 1630s, the Diasamidze family, including Catholicos Eudemus I, was involved in a coup attempt against the pro-Iranian king Rostom of Kartli. After the failure of the coup, the Diasamidze house was dispossessed of some of their estates and went into decline. Under the Russian rule, the Diasamidze were recognized as princes of the Russian Empire according to the decree of 1850.

— Wikipedia

Dayereh

Dayereh

A dayereh is a medium-sized frame drum with jingles, used to accompany both popular and classical music in Iran, the Balkans, and many Central Asian countries such as Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and Afghanistan. Frame drums are also popular in many regions of Georgia, like Kartli, Kakheti, Tusheti, Samegrelo, Racha, and Imereti. This is a single headed percussion instrument which is not only found in Northern South Asia, Central Asia, and the Middle East, but also in parts of the Russian polar regions. The simple drum is formed by attaching a skin cover onto a wooden ring with glue and cloth ties. This is similar to the Persian daira and the Turkish def. Some daira have metal pieces attached to give them a tambourine-like quality.

— Freebase

Ibrahim Bey

Ibrahim Bey

Ibrahim Bey was an Egyptian Mamluk chieftain of Georgian origin. Ibrahim Bey was born as Abram Sinjikashvili into the family of a Christian priest in Martqopi in the eastern Georgian province of Kakheti. As a child, he was captured by Ottoman slave raiders and sold out in Egypt where he was converted to Islam and trained as a Mamluk. Through loyal service to Muhammad Bey Abu l'Dhahab, the Mamluk ruler of Egypt, he rose in rank and attained to the dignity of bey. With time he emerged as one of the most influential Mamluk commanders, sharing a de facto control of Egypt with his fellow Georgian Murad Sinjikashvili Murad Bey he was born in the Tbilisi. The two men survived through the persistent Ottoman attempts at overthrowing the Mamluk regime and civil strifes. At the Battles of the Pyramids and the Heliopolis Ibrahim fought against Napoleon's armies, but was defeated on both occasions. These defeats effectively ended his reign over the country, and he died in obscurity in 1817, having survived Mohammad Ali Pasha's 1811 massacre of Mameluke leaders.

— Freebase

Tsinandali

Tsinandali

Tsinandali is a village in Kakheti, Georgia, noted for the estate and its historic winery which once belonged to the 19th-century aristocratic poet Alexander Chavchavadze. It is situated in the district of Telavi, 79 km east of Tbilisi.

— Freebase

Abashidze

Abashidze

The Abashidze (Georgian: აბაშიძე) is a Georgian family and a former princely house. Appearing in the 15th century, they achieved prominence in the Kingdom of Imereti in western Georgia in the late 17th century and branched out in the eastern Georgian kingdoms of Kakheti and Kartli as well as the then-Ottoman-held southwestern region of Adjara. After the Russian annexation of Georgian polities, the family was confirmed as Knyaz Abashidze (Russian: Абашидзе) by the Tsar’s decree of 1825.

— Wikipedia

Telavi

Telavi

Telavi (Georgian: თელავი [tʰɛlɑvi]) is the main city and administrative center of Georgia's eastern province of Kakheti. Its population consists of some 19,629 inhabitants (as of the year 2014). The city is located on the foothills of the Tsiv-Gombori Range at 500–800 m (1,600–2,600 ft) above sea level.

— Wikipedia

Abazasdze

Abazasdze

The Abazasdze (Georgian: აბაზასძე) were a noble family in Georgia with a surge in prominence in the 11th century. The Abazasdze are hypothesized by the Georgian historian Nodar Shoshiashvili to have descended from the house of Tbeli of Kartli. Tbeli Abazay, mentioned in an 11th-century Georgian inscription from the Bortsvisjvari church at Tbeti, may have been the family's eponymous founder, while Ivane Abazasdze, eristavi ("duke") of Kartli, could have been his grandson. Ivane Abazasdze wielded influence in the 1030s, during the early reign of Bagrat IV of Georgia. The contemporaneous Georgian hagiography Vita of George the Athonite by Giorgi Mtsire described Ivane Abazasdze and his four brothers as "heroic and strong in their wealth and boastful of their arms and proud of the multitude of their army." Their failed plot to assassinate Bagrat IV resulted in the family's loss of much of their influence and prestige. They are only rarely mentioned in subsequent historical records, but the Abazasdze appear to have survived in Upper Kartli as royal vassals, aznauri, from the 15th century to the 18th.By the closing years of the 14th century, a branch of the family was established in Georgia's eastern region of Kakheti and, in the person of Khimshia Abazasdze-Marileli ("of Marili"), who had fought Timur's invading army in 1399, was enfeoffed by the Georgian crown of the former estates of the Abuletisdze in Eliseni in 1405. According to the historian Cyril Toumanoff, the latter-day Kakhetian noble family of Khimshiashvili descended from these "Abazads of Marili".

— Wikipedia

Mukhrani

Mukhrani

Mukhrani (Georgian: მუხრანი, originally Mukhnari [მუხნარი], i.e., "oak-grove") is a historical lowland district in eastern Georgia, currently within the borders of Mtskheta-Mtianeti region, north of the town of Mtskheta. It lies within the historical borders of Kartli, bounded by the Kura River, and its two affluents: Ksani and Aragvi. Strategically located on major transit routes traversing ancient and medieval Georgia, easily irrigable and fertile, Mukhrani was an economically advanced area and, in some sense, a link between Kartli’s lowland and highland districts. In the 2nd-4th centuries AD, the area was home to Dzalisi, one of the most important settlements of Caucasian Iberia. Medieval Georgian annals describe Mukhrani as a forested area greatly favored by the Georgian kings as a hunting ground. We then hear of the noble family of Dzaganisdze being in possession of this district from the 8th/9th century to 1123 when the king David IV confiscated it. Mukhrani became a flourishing sector of the royal domain, and its portion was subsequently donated by the crown to the monastery of Shio-Mghvime and the cathedral of Sveti-Tskhoveli. In 1512, Mukhrani passed, in hereditary ownership, to a collateral branch of the Bagrationi royal dynasty of Kartli. This occurred when the district was scrounged from King David X of Kartli by his younger brother Bagrat in reward for crucial assistance against the neighboring Georgian ruler George II of Kakheti. Henceforth, the lord of Mukhrani came to be known as the Mukhran-Batoni, and the branch of Bagrations which held it as the Bagrationi-Mukhraneli (some members of which were later naturalised in Russia as the "Princes Bagration-Moukransky"). As royal authority declined, Mukhrani evolved into an autonomous seigneury called a satavado, that is "a holding of tavadi", or Georgian principality. It was known as Samukhranbatono, i.e., "[the land] of Mukhran-Batoni." The chief settlement of this princedom was Shios-Ubani, since the 1770s known as the village of Mukhrani, while a fortress built at the confluence of the Mtkvari and Ksani early in the 16th century served as a principal stronghold in the area. Other villages over which the Mukhran-Batoni held sway were Aghaiani, Kandagiani, Tezi, Okami and, for a certain period of time, Lamisqana and Gremiskhevi. The autonomous status of Mukhrani lasted until the Russian annexation of eastern Georgia in 1801, but was not fully abolished until the 1840s.

— Wikipedia

Manavi

Manavi

Manavi (Georgian: მანავი) is a village in the Georgian province of Kakheti. It is famous for its yellowish green wine, Manavis Mtsvane. In Georgia, wine drinking is central to the culture and is especially recommended for long celebrations. Olympic judoka Guram Gogolauri was born here.

— Wikipedia

Gremi

Gremi

Gremi (Georgian: გრემი) is a 16th-century architectural monument – the royal citadel and the Church of the Archangels – in Kakheti, Georgia. The complex is what has survived from the once flourishing town of Gremi and is located southwest of the present-day village of the same name in the Kvareli district, 115 kilometers east of Tbilisi, capital of Georgia.

— Wikipedia

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