Synonyms containing lead out

We've found 26,749 synonyms:

Lead

Lead

led, n. a well-known metal of a bluish-white colour: the plummet for sounding at sea: a thin plate of lead separating lines of type: (pl.) sheets of lead for covering roofs, a flat roof so covered.—v.t. to cover or fit with lead: (print.) to separate lines with leads.—n. Lead′-arm′ing, tallow, &c., placed in the hollow of a sounding-lead, to ascertain the nature of the bottom.—adjs. Lead′ed, fitted with or set in lead: (print.) separated by leads, as the lines of a book, &c.; Lead′en, made of lead: heavy: dull; Lead′en-heart′ed, having an unfeeling heart; Lead′en-step′ping (Milt.), moving slowly.—ns. Lead′-glance, lead ore, galena; Lead′-mill, a mill for grinding white-lead: a leaden disc charged with emery for grinding gems; Lead′-pen′cil, a pencil or instrument for drawing, &c., made of blacklead; Lead′-poi′soning, or Plumbism, poisoning by the absorption and diffusion of lead in the system, its commonest form, Lead or Painter's Colic; Leads′man, a seaman who heaves the lead.—adj. Lead′y, like lead. [A.S. leád; Ger. loth.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Lead

Lead

lēd, v.t. to show the way by going first: to guide by the hand: to direct: to precede: to transport or carry: to allure.—v.i. to go before and show the way: to have a tendency: to exercise dominion:—pr.p. lead′ing; pa.t. and pa.p. led.—n. first place: precedence: direction: (naut.) the course of a running rope from end to end: the right of playing the first card in a round or trick: a main conductor in electrical distribution.—ns. Lead′er, one who leads or goes first: a chief: the leading editorial article in a newspaper (also Leading article): principal wheel in any machinery; Leaderette′, a brief newspaper leader; Lead′ership, state or condition of a leader or conductor; Lead′ing-bus′iness, the acting of the principal parts or rôles in plays; Lead′ing-mō′tive (Ger. leit-motif), in dramatic music, a principal theme: a theme, usually of but few tones, by which any personage or particular emotion is indicated by suggestion as often as it occurs; Lead′ing-ques′tion, a legal term for a question so put to a witness as to suggest the answer that is wished or expected.—n.pl. Lead′ing-strings, strings used to lead children when beginning to walk: vexatious care or custody.—Lead apes in hell (see Ape); Lead astray, to draw into a wrong course, to seduce from right conduct; Lead by the nose, to make one follow submissively; Lead in prayer, to offer up prayer in an assembly, uniting the prayers of others; Lead off, to begin or take the start in anything; Lead on, to persuade to go on, to draw on; Lead one a dance (see Dance); Lead up to, to bring about by degrees, to prepare for anything by steps or stages. [A.S. lǽdan, to lead, lád, a way; Ger. leiten, to lead.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Out

Out

owt, adv. without, not within: gone forth: abroad: to the full stretch or extent: in a state of discovery, development, &c.: in a state of exhaustion, extinction, &c.: away from the mark: completely: at or to an end: to others, as to hire out: freely: forcibly: at a loss: unsheltered: uncovered.—prep. forth from: outside of: exterior: outlying, remote.—n. one who is out, esp. of office—opp. to In: leave to go out, an outing.—v.i. to go or come out.—interj. away! begone!—n. Out′-and-out′er, a thoroughgoer, a first-rate fellow.—adjs. Out′-of-door, open-air; Out-of-the-way′, uncommon: singular: secluded.—Out and away, by far; Out and out, thoroughly: completely—also as adj. thorough, complete; Out-at-elbows, worn-out, threadbare; Out of character, unbecoming: improper; Out of course, out of order; Out of date, unfashionable: not now in use; Out of favour, disliked; Out of hand, instantly; Out of joint, not in proper connection: disjointed; Out of one's mind, mad; Out of pocket, having spent more than one has received; Out of print, not to be had for sale, said of books, &c.; Out of sorts, or temper, unhappy: cross-tempered; Out of the common, unusual, pre-eminent; Out of the question, that cannot be at all considered; Out of time, too soon or too late: not keeping time in music; Out with, away with: (Scot.) outside of: say, do, &c., at once. [A.S. úte, út; Goth. ut, Ger. aus, Sans. ud.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Lead glass

Lead glass

Lead glass is a variety of glass in which lead replaces the calcium content of a typical potash glass. Lead glass contains typically 18–40 weight% lead oxide, while modern lead crystal, historically also known as flint glass due to the original silica source, contains a minimum of 24% PbO. Lead glass is desirable owing to its decorative properties. Originally discovered by Englishman George Ravenscroft in 1674, the technique of adding lead oxide improved the appearance of the glass and made it easier to melt using sea-coal as a furnace fuel. This technique also increased "working period" making the glass easier to manipulate. Technically, the term crystal is not applied to glass, as glass, by definition, lacks a crystalline structure. The use of the term lead crystal remains popular for historical and commercial reasons. It is retained from the Venetian word cristallo to describe the rock crystal imitated by Murano glassmakers. This naming convention has been maintained to the present day to describe decorative hollow-ware. Due to the potential health risks of lead that it contains, true lead crystal glassware is rare nowadays. One material that is commonly used to manufacture glassware and referred to as "crystal" is lead-free crystal glass. In lead-free crystal glass, barium oxide, zinc oxide, or potassium oxide are employed instead of lead oxide. Lead-free crystal has a similar refractive index to lead crystal, but it is lighter and it has less dispersive power. In the European Union, labeling of "crystal" products is regulated by Council Directive 69/493/EEC, which defines four categories, depending on the chemical composition and properties of the material. Only glass products containing at least 24% of lead oxide may be referred to as "lead crystal". Products with less lead oxide, or glass products with other metal oxides used in place of lead oxide, must be labeled "crystallin" or "crystal glass".

— Freebase

EVICTED

EVICTED

If someone is evicted from the place where they are living, they are forced to leave it, usually because they have broken a law or contract. to legally force someone to leave the house they are living in, usually because they have not paid their rent; evict someone from something: expel or eject without recourse to legal process; to expel (a person, especially a tenant) from land, a building, etc., by legal process, as for nonpayment of rent.to recover (property, titles, etc.) by virtue of superior legal title.To put out by force:bump, dismiss, eject, expel, oust, throw out.Informal: chuck.Slang: boot (out), bounce, kick out.Idioms: give someone the boot, give someone the heave-ho, send packing, show someone the door, throw out on one's ear. expel, remove, turn out, put out, throw out, oust, kick out (informal), eject, dislodge, boot out (informal), force to leave, dispossess, chuck out (informal), show the door (to), turf out (informal), throw on to the streets; to force someone to leave somewhere; drive out, banish, send away.

— Editors Contribution

Lead styphnate

Lead styphnate

Lead styphnate (lead 2,4,6-trinitroresorcinate, C6HN3O8Pb ), whose name is derived from styphnic acid, is an explosive used as a component in primer and detonator mixtures for less sensitive secondary explosives. Lead styphnate is only slightly soluble in water and methanol Samples of lead styphnate vary in color from yellow to gold, orange, reddish-brown, to brown. Lead styphnate is known in various polymorphs, hydrates, and basic salts. Normal lead styphnate monohydrate, monobasic lead styphnate, tribasic lead styphnate dihydrate, and pentabasic lead styphnate dehydrate as well as α, β polymorphs of lead styphnate exist. Two forms of lead styphnate are six-sided monohydrate crystals and small rectangular crystals. Lead styphnate is particularly sensitive to fire and the discharge of static electricity. When dry, it can readily detonate by static discharges from the human body. The longer and narrower the crystals, the more susceptible lead styphnate is to static electricity. Lead styphnate does not react with metals and is less sensitive to shock and friction than mercury fulminate or lead azide. It is stable in storage, even at elevated temperatures. As with other lead-containing compounds, lead styphnate is toxic owing to heavy metal poisoning.

— Wikipedia

Plumb

Plumb

plum, n. a mass of lead or other material, hung on a string, to show the perpendicular position: the perpendicular direction or position.—adj. perpendicular.—adv. perpendicularly.—v.t. to adjust by a plumb-line: to make perpendicular: to sound the depth of, as water by a plumb-line.—n. Plumb′-bob, a conoid-shaped metal weight at the end of a plumb-line.—adjs. Plum′bēan, Plum′bēous, consisting of, or resembling, lead: stupid; Plumb′ic, pertaining to, or obtained from, lead; Plumbif′erous, producing lead.—n. Plumb′ing, the art of casting and working in lead, &c.—adj. Plumb′less, incapable of being sounded.—ns. Plumb′-line, a line to which a mass of lead is attached to show the perpendicular: a plummet; Plumb′-rule, a narrow board with a plumb-line fastened to the top, used to determine a perpendicular. [Fr. plomb—L. plumbum, lead.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Lead oxide

Lead oxide

Lead oxides are a group of inorganic compounds with formulas including lead and oxygen. Common lead oxides include: ⁕Lead oxide, PbO, litharge, massicot ⁕Lead oxide, Pb3O4, minium, red leadLead dioxide, PbO2 Less common lead oxides are: ⁕Lead oxide, Pb2O3, lead sesquioxide ⁕Pb12O19 ⁕The so-called black lead oxide, which is a mixture of PbO and fine-powdered metal Pb and used in the production of lead acid batteries.

— Freebase

massicot

massicot

lead monoxide, PbO, obtained as a yellow amorphous powder, the fused and crystalline form of which is called litharge; lead ocher. It is used as a pigment; also, lead oxide yellow, as opposed to red lead, which is lead tetroxide PbO.

— Wiktionary

Lead market

Lead market

Lead market is a term used in innovation theory and denotes a country or region, which pioneers the successful adoption of an innovative design. It sends signalling effects to other "lag" markets, which in turn helps in triggering a process of global diffusion. Marian Beise, one of the foremost propounders of this theory as it has been understood so far, states: "Innovations that have been successful with local users in lead markets have a higher potential of becoming adopted world-wide than any other design preferred in other countries". Christoph Bartlett and Sumantra Ghoshal have described lead markets as "[…] markets that provide the stimuli for most global products and processes of a multinational company. Local innovations in such markets become useful elsewhere as the environmental characteristics that stimulated such innovations diffuse to other locations". To illustrate a lead market with some examples, Germany can be seen as a lead market for renewable energies and (premium) automobiles, while the United States would suit as a lead market for information technologies including e-commerce.Lead markets are thought to help reduce market and technology uncertainty in the process of new product development; and can be seen as an important driver for internationalization of research and development (R&D).Lead markets have been supposed to be characterized by factors such as high per capita income, high level of customer sophistication, and a competitive "eco-system". Such factors are subsumed into 5 "groups of advantages", namely demand advantage, market structure advantage, cost advantage, export advantage, and transfer advantage. Some scholars have also spoken of a regulation advantage, which emanates from favourable government policies (cf. Rennings and Smidt, 2010). Nevertheless, some other scholars have pointed towards regulation's impact on all other factors. For example, Tiwari and Herstatt (2012: 100) state: "[...] we consider it appropriate, not to treat regulation as a separate group since policy factors influence all other groups of advantages and are implicitly covered by them."The theory of lead markets has been criticized for not being "consistent and stringent". While conventional wisdom, due to its emphasis on customer affluence and sophistication as inducers of innovation, has tended to see lead markets exist in economically highly developed countries; recent research, notably by Rajnish Tiwari and Cornelius Herstatt of Hamburg University of Technology (e.g. Tiwari and Herstatt, 2011a, Tiwari and Herstatt, 2011b), has emphasized the need to update/extend the lead market model to adjust it to the changing ground realities in the face of globalization and sustained economic growth in developing nations. Using examples of several frugal innovations from India, and more specifically the case of small car industry in India's automotive sector, Rajnish Tiwari in his dissertation at Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH) has proposed that lead markets can emerge in developing nations as well provided the market size enables significant economies of scale and the country's innovation system is endowed with the necessary technological capabilities. These two conditions, seen in conjunction with several other factors such as embeddedness in the international trade and access to open global innovation networks (OGINs), can in many instances compensate other typical drawbacks of developing countries, such as low purchasing power. As a consequence, Tiwari's dissertation has proposed to update the model to include technology advantage in the model, while combining the export and transfer advantages as one single group. Factors within the individual groups of advantages have been also update/modified. The evolution of India's small car sector has also provided some valuable insights into possible emergence of a lead market in a country. This model, if validated by further research, would help enable an ex ante analysis of lead markets, whereas so far mostly ex post, macroeconomic analyses have been the norm.

— Wikipedia

Battery, Secondary

Battery, Secondary

A voltaic battery whose positive and negative electrodes are formed or deposited by a current from a separate source of electricity by electrolysis. On disconnection the battery is ready to yield a current, in the reverse direction of that of the charging current. The usual type has lead plates on one of which lead binoxide and on the other of which spongy lead is formed. The lead binoxide seems to be the negative element, and it also acts as the depolarizer. The spongy lead is the positive electrode. The solution is dilute sulphuric acid of specific gravity 1.17. The action consists first in the oxidation of the spongy lead. The hydrogen set free by the reaction, and which by electrolytic transfer goes to the other plate, reduces the lead binoxide to protoxide. The sulphuric acid then attacks the oxides and converts the oxides into sulphates.

The charging process consists in sending a current in the reverse direction through the battery. If there are several cells they are arranged in series, so that each one receives the same intensity of current. An electrolytic decomposition takes place, the lead sulphate on one plate is reduced to metallic lead, and that on the other plate is oxidized to lead binoxide. It is then ready for use.



The plates in a lead plate battery are of very large area per cell, and are placed close together. Sometimes, as in Planté's battery, large flat plates are laid together with a separating insulator between them, and are then rolled into a spiral. Sometimes, the most usual arrangement, the plates are in sets, the positive and negative ones alternating, and each cell containing a number of plates.

To secure a good quantity of active material, the plates are sometimes perforated, and the perforations are filled with oxide of lead. This gives a good depth of material for the charging current to act on, and avoids the necessity for a tedious "forming," q. v.

The electro-motive force of such a battery per cell is 2 volts. Its resistance may only be one or two-hundredths of an ohm. An intense current of many amperes can be supplied by it, but to avoid injuring the cell a current far less than the maximum is taken from it.

To charge it, a slightly greater electro-motive force, the excess being termed spurious voltage, is required.

Fig. 48. SIEMENS' AND HALSKE'S PAPER PULP BATTERY.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

massicot

massicot

Lead monoxide (also called Lead protoxide), PbO, obtained as a yellow amorphous powder, the fused and crystalline form of which is called litharge; lead ocher. It is used as a pigment. It is also called lead oxide yellow, as opposed to red lead, which is lead tetroxide Pb3O4.

— GCIDE

Lead

Lead

Lead is a chemical element in the carbon group with symbol Pb and atomic number 82. Lead is a soft and malleable metal, which is regarded as a heavy metal and poor metal. Metallic lead has a bluish-white color after being freshly cut, but it soon tarnishes to a dull grayish color when exposed to air. Lead has a shiny chrome-silver luster when it is melted into a liquid. Lead is used in building construction, lead-acid batteries, bullets and shot, weights, as part of solders, pewters, fusible alloys, and as a radiation shield. Lead has the highest atomic number of all of the stable elements, although the next higher element, bismuth, has a half-life that is so long that it can be considered stable. Its four stable isotopes have 82 protons, a magic number in the nuclear shell model of atomic nuclei. Lead, at certain contact degrees, is a poisonous substance to animals, including humans. It damages the nervous system and causes brain disorders. Excessive lead also causes blood disorders in mammals. Like the element mercury, another heavy metal, lead is a neurotoxin that accumulates both in soft tissues and the bones. Lead poisoning has been documented from ancient Rome, ancient Greece, and ancient China.

— Freebase

Lead(II) acetate

Lead(II) acetate

Lead(II) acetate, also known as lead acetate, lead diacetate, plumbous acetate, sugar of lead, lead sugar, salt of Saturn, and Goulard's powder, is a white crystalline chemical compound with a sweetish taste. It is made by treating lead(II) oxide with acetic acid. Like other lead compounds, it is toxic. Lead acetate is soluble in water and glycerin. With water it forms the trihydrate, Pb(CH3COO)2·3H2O, a colorless or white efflorescent monoclinic crystalline substance. The substance is used as a reagent to make other lead compounds and as a fixative for some dyes. In low concentrations, it is the principal active ingredient in progressive types of hair coloring dyes. Lead(II) acetate is also used as a mordant in textile printing and dyeing, as a drier in paints and varnishes, and in preparing other lead compounds.

— Freebase

Lead paint

Lead paint

Lead paint or lead-based paint is paint containing lead. As pigment, lead(II) chromate (Pb Cr O4, "chrome yellow"), Lead(II,IV) oxide, (Pb3 O4, "red lead"), and lead(II) carbonate (Pb C O3, "white lead") are the most common forms. Lead is added to paint to accelerate drying, increase durability, maintain a fresh appearance, and resist moisture that causes corrosion. It is one of the main health and environmental hazards associated with paint. In some countries, lead continues to be added to paint intended for domestic use, whereas countries such as the U.S. and the UK have regulations prohibiting this, although lead paint may still be found in older properties painted prior to the introduction of such regulations. Although lead has been banned from household paints in the United States since 1978, paint used in road markings may still contain it. Alternatives such as water-based, lead-free traffic paint are readily available, and many states and federal agencies have changed their purchasing contracts to buy these instead.

— Wikipedia

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An antonym for "ignominious"
  • A. inglorious
  • B. opprobrious
  • C. smuggled
  • D. honorable