Synonyms containing lift every voice and sing

We've found 367,754 synonyms:

Lift

Lift

lift, v.t. to bring to a higher position: to elevate or keep elevated: to elate: to take and carry away: (obs.) to bear, support: (slang) to arrest: to steal.—v.i. to rise: to try to rise.—n. act of lifting: that which is to be raised: that which assists to lift: a hoisting-machine: advancement.—adj. Lift′able.—ns. Lift′er, one who, or that which, lifts: (Shak.) a thief; Lift′ing-bridge, a drawbridge raised so as to allow ships to pass; Lift′-pump, any pump which is not a force-pump.—Lift the hand, to raise it in hostility; Lift up the eyes, to look, direct one's eyes, or thoughts, to; Lift up the face, to look upward, as in supplication; Lift up the hand, to make oath, swear: to pray; Lift up the head, to rejoice, exult; Lift up the voice, to cry loudly.—Dead lift (see Dead). [Ice. lyptalopt, the air.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sing

Sing

sing, v.i. to utter melodious sounds in musical succession: to make a small, shrill sound: to relate in verse: to squeal: to ring: to be capable of being sung.—v.t. to utter musically: to chant: to celebrate: to attend on: to effect by singing: to celebrate or relate in verse:—pa.t. sang or sung; pa.p. sung.—adj. Sing′able.—ns. Sing′ableness; Sing′er, one who sings: one whose occupation is to sing; Sing′ing, the act or art of singing; Sing′ing-bird, a bird that sings, a songster; Sing′ing-book, a song-book; Sing′ing-gall′ery, a gallery occupied by singers; Sing′ing-hinn′y, a currant cake baked on a girdle.—adv. Sing′ingly.—ns. Sing′ing-man (Shak.), one employed to sing, as in a cathedral; Sing′ing-mas′ter, a master who teaches singing; Sing′ing-school, a place where singing is taught; Sing′ing-voice, the voice as used in singing; Sing′ing-wom′an, a woman employed to sing.—Sing another song, or tune, to change one's tone or attitude, esp. to a humbler manner; Sing out, to call out distinctly, to shout; Sing small, to assume a humble tone: to play a minor part. [A.S. singan; Ger. singen, Goth. siggwan.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Single

Single

sing′gl, adj. consisting of one only: individual, unique: separate, private: alone: unmarried: not combined with others: unmixed: having one only on each side: straightforward: sincere: simple, normal: pure.—v.t. to separate: to choose one from others: to select from a number.—adjs. Sing′le-act′ing, acting effectively in one direction only—of any reciprocating machine or implement; Sing′le-breast′ed, with a single row of buttons or loops only, of a coat, corsage, &c.—n. Single-en′try, a system of book-keeping in which each entry appears only once on one side or other of an account.—adj. Sing′le-eyed, having but one eye: devoted, unselfish.—ns. Sing′le-flow′er, a flower containing a single set of petals, as a wild rose; Sing′le-foot, a gait of horses, the amble.—adjs. Sing′le-hand′ed, by one's self: unassisted: having only one workman; Sing′le-heart′ed, having a single or sincere heart: without duplicity.—adv. Sing′le-heart′edly.—adj. Sing′le-mind′ed, having a single or sincere mind: upright.—ns. Sing′le-mind′edness; Sing′leness, state of being single or alone: freedom from deceit: sincerity: simplicity.—adj. Sing′le-soled, having a single sole, as a shoe: poor.—ns. Sing′le-stick, a stick or cudgel for one hand: a fight or game with singlesticks; Sing′let, an undershirt or waistcoat; Sing′leton, in whist, a hand containing one card only of some suit; Sing′letree (the same as Swingletree); Sing′le-wom′an, an unmarried woman: (obs.) a whore.—adv. Sing′ly, one by one: particularly: alone: by one's self: honestly: sincerely. [O. Fr.,—L. sin-gulus, one to each, separate, akin to sem-el, once, Gr. ham-a.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Lift chair

Lift chair

Lift chairs are chairs that feature a powered lifting mechanism that pushes the entire chair up from its base and so assists the user to a standing position. In the United States, lift chairs qualify as Durable Medical Equipment under Medicare Part B.In a February 1989 report released by the Inspector General of the US Department of Health and Human Services, it was found that: lift chairs might not possibly meet Medicare's requirements for Durable Medical Equipment (DME) and lift chair claims need to be re-regulated. The report was stimulated by an increase in lift chair claims between 1984 and 1985 from 200,000 to 700,000. A New York Times article stated that aggressive TV ads were pushing consumers to inquire about lift chairs and, once consumers called in, a form was sent to them for their physicians to sign. Some companies would ship lift chairs before receiving a physician's signature; therefore, forcing the physicians to sign or else their patient will be forced to pay for the chair.Medicare may only cover the cost of the lift-mechanism rather than the entire chair. Before Medicare can be considered for covering the cost, patients will need to have a visit with their physician to discuss the need for this particular equipment. The DME provider will then request a prescription and a certificate of medical necessity (CMN). The CMN typical involves five questions that the physician needs to answer. Typically, the questions are (1) Does the patient have severe arthritis, (2) Does the patient have a neuromuscular disease, (3) Is the patient incapable of getting up from a regular chair in their home, (4) Can the patient walk once standing, and (5) Have all other therapeutic measures been taken? If any of the questions are answered "NO", it may likely result in a denial of the claim. Typically, DME providers require full payment for the lift chair and will offer reimbursement upon approval from Medicare. DME providers cannot bill Medicare without first providing the equipment.

— Wikipedia

Voice

Voice

vois, n. sound from the mouth: sound given out by anything: utterance or mode of utterance: language: expression: expressed opinion: one who speaks: (Shak.) reputation: sound uttered with resonance of the vocal chords: vote: (gram.) mode of inflecting verbs, as being active or passive.—v.t. to give utterance to, declare, announce: to fit for sounding: to regulate the tone of: to utter with voice or tone, as distinguished from breath.—adjs. Voiced, furnished with a voice; Voice′ful, having a voice: vocal.—n. Voice′fulness.—adj. Voice′less, having no voice or vote.—ns. Voice′lessness; Voic′er; Voic′ing, the regulating of the tone of organ pipes, ensuring proper power, pitch, and quality.—In my voice (Shak.), in my name; Inner voice, part, in music, a voice-part intermediate between the highest and the lowest; In voice, in good condition for singing or speaking.—With one voice, unanimously. [O. Fr. voix—L. vox, vocis; akin to Gr. epos, a word.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Harsh voice

Harsh voice

Harsh voice, also called ventricular voice or (in some high-tone registers) pressed voice, is the production of speech sounds (typically vowels) with a constricted laryngeal cavity, which generally involves epiglottal co-articulation. Harsh voice includes the use of the ventricular folds (the false vocal cords) to damp the glottis in a way similar to what happens when a person talks while lifting a heavy load, or, if the sound is voiceless, like clearing one's throat. It contrasts with faucalized voice, which involves the expansion of the larynx. When the epiglottal co-articulation becomes a trill, the vowels are called strident. There is no symbol for harsh voice in the IPA. Diacritics seen in the literature include the under-tilde used for creaky voice, which may be appropriate when ambiguity is not a problem, the double under-tilde used as the ad hoc diacritic for strident vowels, which may be allophonic with harsh voice, and an ad hoc underline. In the VoQS, possibly relevant voice-quality symbols are {V!} ("harsh voice"), {V!!} ("ventricular phonation"), and {V͈} ("pressed phonation/tight voice"), but these are normally only placed on a capital vee for "voice". In VoQS usage, "harsh voice" does not involve vibration of the ventricular folds, while in "pressed" or "tight" voice the arytenoid cartilages adduct so that only the anterior ligamental vocal folds vibrate. The asterisk, IPA for articulations that do not have existing symbols, could also be used: ⟨◌͙⟩. The Bai language has both harsh ("pressed") and strident vowels as part of its register system, but they are not contrastive. The Bor dialect of Dinka has contrastive modal, breathy, faucalized, and harsh voice in its vowels, as well as three tones. (The ad hoc diacritics employed in the source are a subscript double quotation mark for faucalized voice, [a͈], and underlining for harsh voice, [a̱], a diacritic that indicates retraction in the IPA.) Examples are,

— Wikipedia

Vocology

Vocology

Vocology is the science and practice of vocal habilitation. Its concerns include the nature of speech and language pathology, the defects of the vocal tract, the remediation of speech therapy and the voice training and voice pedagogy of song and speech for actors and public speakers. In its broadest sense, vocology is the study of voice, but as a professional discipline it has a narrower focus: the science and practice of voice habilitation, which includes evaluation, diagnosis, and intervention. It is not yet its own professional degree thus only assist superficially to the voice medicine team. Usually a person practicing vocology is a voice coach with additional training in the voice medical arts, or a speech pathologist with additional voice performance training—so they can better treat the professional voice user. The study of vocology is recognized academically in taught courses and institutes such as the National Center for Voice and Speech, Westminster Choir College at Rider University, The Grabscheid Voice Center at Mount Sinai Medical Center, the Vox Humana Laboratory at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center and the Regional Center for Voice and Swallowing, at Milan's Azienda Ospedaliera Fatebenefratelli e Oftalmico, and recently at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The National Center for Voice and Speech and the University of Iowa offer a 8 week intensive course and a Certificate in Vocology.

— Freebase

Vertical-lift bridge

Vertical-lift bridge

A vertical-lift bridge or lift bridge is a type of movable bridge in which a span rises vertically while remaining parallel with the deck. The vertical lift offers several benefits over other movable bridges such as the bascule and swing-span bridge. Generally speaking they cost less to build for longer moveable spans. The counterweights in a vertical lift are only required to be equal to the weight of the deck, whereas bascule bridge counterweights must weigh several times as much as the span being lifted. As a result, heavier materials can be used in the deck, and so this type of bridge is especially suited for heavy railroad use. Although most vertical-lift bridges use towers, each equipped with counterweights, some use hydraulic jacks located below the deck. An example is the 52-foot span bridge at St Paul Avenue in Milwaukee. Another design used balance beams to lift the deck, with pivoting bascules located on the top of the lift towers. An example of this kind was built at La Salle in Illinois, USA. The biggest disadvantage to the vertical-lift bridge is the height restriction for vessels passing under it. This is a result of the deck remaining suspended above the passageway.

— Freebase

Every

Every

ev′ėr-i, adj. each one of a number: all taken separately.—pron. Ev′erybody, every person.—adj. Ev′eryday, of or belonging to every day, daily: common, usual: pertaining to week-days, in opposition to Sunday.—pron. Ev′erything, all things: all.—advs. Ev′eryway, in every way or respect; Ev′erywhen, at all times; Ev′erywhere, in every place.—Every bit, the whole; Every now and then, or again, at intervals; Every other, every second—e.g. every other day, every alternate day. [A.S. ǽfre, ever, and ǽlc, each.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Airfoil

Airfoil

An airfoil (American English) or aerofoil (British English) is the cross-sectional shape of a wing, blade (of a propeller, rotor, or turbine), or sail (as seen in cross-section). An airfoil-shaped body moving through a fluid produces an aerodynamic force. The component of this force perpendicular to the direction of motion is called lift. The component parallel to the direction of motion is called drag. Subsonic flight airfoils have a characteristic shape with a rounded leading edge, followed by a sharp trailing edge, often with a symmetric curvature of upper and lower surfaces. Foils of similar function designed with water as the working fluid are called hydrofoils. The lift on an airfoil is primarily the result of its angle of attack. When oriented at a suitable angle, the airfoil deflects the oncoming air (for fixed-wing aircraft, a downward force), resulting in a force on the airfoil in the direction opposite to the deflection. This force is known as aerodynamic force and can be resolved into two components: lift and drag. Most foil shapes require a positive angle of attack to generate lift, but cambered airfoils can generate lift at zero angle of attack. This "turning" of the air in the vicinity of the airfoil creates curved streamlines, resulting in lower pressure on one side and higher pressure on the other. This pressure difference is accompanied by a velocity difference, via Bernoulli's principle, so the resulting flowfield about the airfoil has a higher average velocity on the upper surface than on the lower surface. The lift force can be related directly to the average top/bottom velocity difference without computing the pressure by using the concept of circulation and the Kutta–Joukowski theorem.

— Wikipedia

Surface lift

Surface lift

A surface lift is a type of cable transportation system used to transport skiers and snowboarders where riders remain on the ground as they are pulled uphill. Types of surface lifts include the Poma lift, J-bar, T-bar, rope tow, and magic carpet. Although these types of lifts were once prevalent, they have since been overtaken in popularity by higher capacity aerial lifts like chairlifts and the gondola lift. Today, surface lifts are most often found on beginner slopes and very small ski areas. Surface lifts have the advantage of being less intimidating, especially for beginners: the speed is slow, they are usually situated on beginner terrain, the passenger's safe loading window is wider than most types of lift, and remaining on the ground is perceived to be more controlled than off the ground. They are also generally less expensive to construct and maintain than an equivalent length aerial lift. The disadvantages of a surface lift include less passenger capacity. They add a larger terrain obstacle and collision hazard. Surface lifts are restricted to smooth, gradual terrain, and require more new passenger skills than most types of aerial lift to safely ride.

— Freebase

Hoarse voice

Hoarse voice

A hoarse voice, also known as dysphonia, is when the voice involuntarily sounds breathy, raspy, or strained, or is softer in volume or lower in pitch. A hoarse voice, can be associated with a feeling of unease or scratchiness in the throat. Hoarseness is often a symptom of problems in the vocal folds of the larynx. It may be caused by laryngitis, which in turn may be caused by an upper respiratory infection, a cold, or allergies. Cheering at sporting events, speaking loudly in noisy situations, talking for too long without resting one's voice, singing loudly, or speaking with a voice that's too high or too low can also cause temporary hoarseness. A number of other causes for losing one's voice exist, and treatment is generally by resting the voice and treating the underlying cause. If the cause is misuse or overuse of the voice drinking plenty of water may alleviate the problems.It appears to occur more commonly in females and the elderly. Furthermore, certain occupational groups, such as teachers and singers, are at increased risk.Long-term hoarseness, or hoarseness that persists over three weeks, especially when not associated with a cold or flu should be assessed by a medical doctor. It is also recommended to see a doctor if hoarseness is associated with coughing up blood, difficulties swallowing, a lump in the neck, pain when speaking or swallowing, difficulty breathing, or complete loss of voice for more than a few days. For voice to be classified as "dysphonic", abnormalities must be present in one or more vocal parameters: pitch, loudness, quality, or variability. Perceptually, dysphonia can be characterised by hoarse, breathy, harsh, or rough vocal qualities, but some kind of phonation remains.Dysphonia can be categorized into two broad main types: organic and functional. The type of dysphonia is dependent on the cause of the pathology. While the causes of dysphonia can be divided into five basic categories, all of them result in an interruption of the ability of the vocal folds to vibrate normally during exhalation, which affects the voice. The assessment and diagnosis of dysphonia is done by a multidisciplinary team, and involves the use of a variety of subjective and objective measures, which look at both the quality of the voice as well as the physical state of the larynx. Multiple treatments have been developed to address organic and functional causes of dysphonia. Dysphonia can be targeted through direct therapy, indirect therapy, medical treatments, and surgery. Functional dysphonias may be treated through direct and indirect voice therapies, whereas surgeries are recommended for chronic, organic dysphonias.

— Wikipedia

Voice browser

Voice browser

A voice browser is a web browser that presents an interactive voice user interface to the user. In addition, it typically provides an interface to the PSTN or a PBX. Just as a visual web browser works with HTML pages, a voice browser operates on pages that specify voice dialogues. Typically these pages are written in VoiceXML, the W3C's standard voice dialog markup language, but other proprietary voice dialogue languages remain in use. A voice browser presents information aurally, using pre-recorded audio file playback or using text-to-speech software to render textual information as audio. A voice browser obtains information using speech recognition and keypad entry. As speech recognition and web technologies have matured over the past decade, thousands of voice applications have been deployed commercially and voice browsers are supplanting traditional proprietary IVR systems. Scores of companies provide voice browsers. These take the form of software, packaged hardware/software solutions or hosted solutions.

— Freebase

Soft Elevator

Soft Elevator

Soft elevator” is a program, it is an expert management system for elevators companies it saves the time , money and potential work of elevators companies by solving and avoiding the problems of Fault installation of elevators and errors and bad installations of lifts which may cause damages and accidents during operation . How ? The program calculates and draws the lift designs such as projected elevator elevation , plane and explains cabinet depth and width , the depth , width and height of the hoist way and the door structural opening of each floor and the spaces and heights between floors ,the overhead distance , shows the location of elevator cabinet and its counter weight at specific location , and calculates and draws and along the rails of the lift and its counterweight . Calculates and draws a vertical projection of the machine room, explaining dimensions of the Machine , its sheaves , I , U beams and dimensions of other devices and operating panel and control and calculates all the components which required for installing the lift , the program saves all the entered data and out out information of each lift project in its data base we can get the information like drawing and exact components in no time . How to use Soft Elevator 1-Enter all the data which is required in the main window Note- You have first draw the plan of the Hoist way by pressing its button , then you may draw the machine room elevation by pressing its button or draw the plan of machine room with holes of counter weight wires , cabinet wires and governor wires by pressing its button too . 2-You should to select from the three (3) selections which found in the bottom of the Main window , a- check "Zoom" b- check "the right direction of door opining " c- check "the optimization size of Cabinet according to quantity of travelers " , note if you select the optimization size of cabinet then you have to enter the quantity of travelers who will use the elevator . 3-Press "Draw Hoist way plan " button , the program will ask you to enter the cabinet thickness it is about 25mm then the far distance between the cabinet side and the cabinet guide its about 40mm , then the program will check if you selected the optimization size of Cabinet if yes it will check if the quantity of travelers are greater than the maximum size of cabinet or not then if ok it will ask you which decreasing you prefer to do if in cabinet width

— Editors Contribution

Voice Actor

Voice Actor

Voice acting is the art of providing voices for animated characters and radio and audio dramas and comedy, as well as doing voice-overs in radio and television commercials, audio dramas, dubbed foreign language films, video games, puppet shows, and amusement rides. Performers are called voice actors/actresses, voice artists or simply voice talent, and their roles may also involve singing, although a second voice actor is sometimes cast as the character's singing voice. Voice artists are also used to record the individual sample fragments played back by a computer in an automated announcement. At its simplest, this is just a short phrase which is played back as necessary, e.g. the Mind the gap announcement introduced by London Underground in 1969. In a more complicated system such as a speaking clock, the voice artist usually doesn't actually record 1440 different announcements, one for each minute of the day, or even 60, instead the announcement is re-assembled from fragments such as "minutes past" "eighteen" and "pm." For example, the word "twelve" can be used for both "Twelve O'Clock" and "Six Twelve." For some automated applications, such as London Underground's Mind the gap announcement, the sound of a voice artist may be preferred over synthesized voices because the human voices sound more natural to the listener.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym of "spread out"?
  • A. unfold
  • B. dissipate
  • C. concentrated
  • D. circularise