Synonyms containing locator map

We've found 1,093 synonyms:

Record locator

Record locator

A record locator is an alphanumeric code, typically 6 characters in length, used in airline reservation systems to access a specific record. When a passenger, travel agent or airline employee refers to a record locator they typically mean a pointer to a specific reservation which is known as a Passenger Name Record or PNR. However, a record locator can point at records containing other forms of data. Record locators are unique within a given system at a specific point in time. Because the number of character combinations in 6 characters is finite record locators get reused once the data to which it refers has been purged from the system. Because 1, I and L can be confused these characters are not always used in record locators. The pool of available character combinations is further reduced because the locator is actually a location address and there are rules about what character combinations can be used for such addresses. Because the term record locator is usually used to refer to a PNR the two terms can become confused. When a reservation is made a PNR is created in the system used by the person making the booking. This PNR will have a record locator. If the booking has been made through the airline and the only flight are operated by the airline making the reservation only one PNR will exist. However if the booking contains flights of more than one airline then the reservation for both flights will be made through the first airline. The first airline will send messages to the 2nd confirming the reservation and the 2nd airline will create a separate PNR which has its own record locator. If the booking is made through a travel agency then a PNR will exist in the system used by the agency and further PNRs will exist in each airline system.

— Freebase

Map

Map

map, n. a representation of the surface of the earth, or of part of it on a plane surface: a similar drawing of the stars in the sky.—v.t. to draw in the form of a map, as the figure of any portion of land: to describe clearly:—pr.p. map′ping; pa.t. and pa.p. mapped.—ns. Map′-meas′urer, an instrument for measuring distances other than in straight lines on a map; Map′-mount′er, one who mounts maps, or backs them with canvas and fixes them on rollers, &c.; Map′pery (Shak.), the art of planning and designing maps; Map′pist.—Map out, to mark down the chief points clearly. [L. mappa, a napkin, a painted cloth, orig. Punic.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

locator map

locator map

A locator map, sometimes referred to simply as a locator, is typically a simple map used in cartography to show the location of a particular geographic area within its larger and presumably more familiar context. Depending on the needs of the cartographer, this type of map can be used on its own or as an inset or addition to a larger map.

— Wiktionary

Map

Map

to represent by a map; -- often with out; as, to survey and map, or map out, a county. Hence, figuratively: To represent or indicate systematically and clearly; to sketch; to plan; as, to map, or map out, a journey; to map out business

— Webster Dictionary

Scale (map)

Scale (map)

The scale of a map is the ratio of a distance on the map to the corresponding distance on the ground. This simple concept is complicated by the curvature of the Earth's surface, which forces scale to vary across a map. Because of this variation, the concept of scale becomes meaningful in two distinct ways. The first way is the ratio of the size of the generating globe to the size of the Earth. The generating globe is a conceptual model to which the Earth is shrunk and from which the map is projected. The ratio of the Earth's size to the generating globe's size is called the nominal scale (= principal scale = representative fraction). Many maps state the nominal scale and may even display a bar scale (sometimes merely called a 'scale') to represent it. The second distinct concept of scale applies to the variation in scale across a map. It is the ratio of the mapped point's scale to the nominal scale. In this case 'scale' means the scale factor (= point scale = particular scale). If the region of the map is small enough to ignore Earth's curvature, such as in a town plan, then a single value can be used as the scale without causing measurement errors. In maps covering larger areas, or the whole Earth, the map's scale may be less useful or even useless in measuring distances. The map projection becomes critical in understanding how scale varies throughout the map. When scale varies noticeably, it can be accounted for as the scale factor. Tissot's indicatrix is often used to illustrate the variation of point scale across a map.

— Wikipedia

Topographic map

Topographic map

A topographic map is a type of map characterized by large-scale detail and quantitative representation of relief, usually using contour lines in modern mapping, but historically using a variety of methods. Traditional definitions require a topographic map to show both natural and man-made features. A topographic map is typically published as a map series, made up of two or more map sheets that combine to form the whole map. A contour line is a combination of two line segments that connect but do not intersect; these represent elevation on a topographic map. The Canadian Centre for Topographic Information provides this definition: Other authors define topographic maps by contrasting them with another type of map; they are distinguished from smaller-scale "chorographic maps" that cover large regions, "planimetric maps" that do not show elevations, and "thematic maps" that focus on specific topics. However, in the vernacular and day to day world, the representation of relief is popularly held to define the genre, such that even small-scale maps showing relief are commonly called "topographic". The study or discipline of topography, while interested in relief, is actually a much broader field of study which takes into account all natural and man made features of terrain.

— Freebase

Locator map

Locator map

A locator map, sometimes referred to simply as a locator, is typically a simple map used in cartography to show the location of a particular geographic area within its larger and presumably more familiar context. Depending on the needs of the cartographer, this type of map can be used on its own or as an inset or addition to a larger map.

— Freebase

Geochron

Geochron

Geochron, Inc. is an American company founded in 1965 by James Kilburg, an inventor from Luxembourg. It is also the name of their flagship product, the Geochron Global Time Indicator. The Geochron was the first world clock to display day and night on a world map, showing the familiar "bell curve" of light and darkness. The Geochron employs an intricate analog clockwork mechanism for its display, that shows the month, date, day of the week, hours and minutes, the areas of the world currently experiencing day and night, and the meridian passage of the sun. The main display is dominated by a world map, with time zones prominently indicated. At the top of the map are arrows corresponding to each time zone. As each day progresses, the map is scrolled from left to right by gear mechanisms, and the arrows for each time zone shift their positions relative to a stationary band fixed at the top that has a horizontal series of numbers representing hours. The viewer may read the time by seeing what number his time zone's arrow is currently pointing to. The map is backlit, and a mechanism behind the map defines well-lit and shaded areas that are also stationary relative to the movement of the map. In this way, as time progresses, different areas are shown to be experiencing daytime and night. The center of the lit area lines up with the 12 noon on the stationary time strip. There is also a day-and-month readout below the map, and a minutes readout above. Each Geochron is assembled upon demand, with prices starting at above $1,500. President Ronald Reagan presented a Geochron to Mikhail Gorbachev in 1985 as an "example of American ingenuity." In the mid-1980s, the company was selling about 75 clocks per month, increasing to around 200 per month during the holiday season. It had 16 employees in 1987.Today, the Geochron Digital 4k takes the terrestrial beauty of our mechanical clocks in to the digital realm in glittering 4k resolution. The digital Geochron is unconstrained by physical gears and assemblies, so it’s much more affordable… constantly evolving with more mapsets, layers, and live data than ever before.The Hubble Space Telescope control center at Goddard Space Flight Center uses a Geochron in its day-to-day operations. The European Space Agency displays a Geochron in their command center. The Smithsonian Institution has called the Geochron the "last significant contribution in timekeeping." The world clock was featured in motion pictures such as Hunt for Red October, Patriot Games, Clear and Present Danger, and Three Days of the Condor. Founder James Kilburg died in 1985. His son, James M. Kilburg, had purchased one-third of the company from his father a short time earlier. Bob Williamson acquired the other two-thirds of the company, and he and the younger Kilburg became partners in managing the business.After many years in the San Francisco Bay Area, in 2007 Geochron Enterprises was sold and moved to Oregon City, Oregon, and became Geochron, Inc. It was sold again in 2015, to Patrick Bolan. The Geochron World Clock has been updated under new management to include new mapsets, lighting options, and new magnetic stepper motors. Geochron World Clocks are still built and restored by hand and manufactured at a small machine shop in Oregon City. In September 2019, the company announced that it was preparing to move from Oregon City to Estacada, Oregon. In 2018, Geochron released an electronic version of its mechanical clock, optimized for 4K resolution displays. It includes many features that were unavailable prior to the internet, including satellite tracking, and demographic layers above different mapsets. All Geochron mapsets are in a Mercator Projection. As of October 2019, the company continues to sell the mechanical version, in addition to the digital version.

— Wikipedia

Horseshoe map

Horseshoe map

In the mathematics of chaos theory, a horseshoe map is any member of a class of chaotic maps of the square into itself. It is a core example in the study of dynamical systems. The map was introduced by Stephen Smale while studying the behavior of the orbits of the van der Pol oscillator. The action of the map is defined geometrically by squishing the square, then stretching the result into a long strip, and finally folding the strip into the shape of a horseshoe. Most points eventually leave the square under the action of the map. They go to the side caps where they will, under iteration, converge to a fixed point in one of the caps. The points that remain in the square under repeated iteration form a fractal set and are part of the invariant set of the map. The squishing, stretching and folding of the horseshoe map are typical of chaotic systems, but not necessary or even sufficient. In the horseshoe map the squeezing and stretching are uniform. They compensate each other so that the area of the square does not change. The folding is done neatly, so that the orbits that remain forever in the square can be simply described. For a horseshoe map: ⁕there are an infinite number of periodic orbits;

— Freebase

Choropleth map

Choropleth map

A choropleth map is a thematic map in which areas are shaded or patterned in proportion to the measurement of the statistical variable being displayed on the map, such as population density or per-capita income. The choropleth map provides an easy way to visualize how a measurement varies across a geographic area or it shows the level of variability within a region. A special type of choropleth map is a prism map, a three-dimensional map in which a given region's height on the map is proportional to the statistical variable's value for that region.

— Freebase

Sinusoidal projection

Sinusoidal projection

The sinusoidal projection is a pseudocylindrical equal-area map projection, sometimes called the Sanson–Flamsteed or the Mercator equal-area projection. Jean Cossin of Dieppe was one of the first mapmakers to use the sinusoidal, appearing in a world map of 1570. The projection is defined by: where φ is the latitude, λ is the longitude, and λ0 is the central meridian. Scale is constant along the central meridian, and east–west scale is constant throughout the map. Therefore the length of each parallel on the map is proportional to the cosine of the latitude, as it is on the globe. This makes the left and right bounding meridians of the map into half of a sine wave, each mirroring the other. Each meridian except the central meridian is also half of a sine wave with only the amplitude differing, giving the projection its name. Each is shown on the map as longer than the central meridian, whereas on the globe all are the same length. The true distance between two points on a meridian can be measured on the map as the vertical distance between the parallels that intersect the meridian at those points. With no distortion along the central meridian and the equator, distances along those lines are correct, as are the angles of intersection of other lines with those two lines. Distortion is lowest throughout the region of the map close to those lines.

— Freebase

Isopach map

Isopach map

An isopach map illustrates thickness variations within a tabular unit, layer or stratum. Isopachs are contour lines of equal thickness over an area. Isopach maps are utilized in hydrographic survey, stratigraphy, sedimentology, structural geology, petroleum geology and volcanology. An isopach map is similar to an isochore map, but these terms actually describe different methods of displaying thickness variations within a layer. ⁕An isopach map displays lines of equal thickness in a layer where the thicknesses are measured perpendicular to the layer boundaries. Isopach maps in geology are also referred to as True Stratigraphic Thickness maps. ⁕An isochore map displays lines of equal thickness in a layer where the thicknesses are measured vertically. Isochore maps in geology are also referred to as True Vertical Thickness maps. Thus, an isochore and isopach map are the same only when both the top and bottom surfaces of the layer shown are horizontal. When the layer shown is inclined, as is usually the case, the thicknesses displayed in an isochore map of the layer will be greater than the thicknesses displayed in an isopach map of the same layer. Unfortunately the terms isopach and isochore are widely confused, and many times maps of True Vertical Thickness, which by definition are isochore maps, are incorrectly labeled isopach maps.

— Freebase

Map projection

Map projection

A map projection is a systematic transformation of the latitudes and longitudes of locations on the surface of a sphere or an ellipsoid into locations on a plane. Map projections are necessary for creating maps. All map projections distort the surface in some fashion. Depending on the purpose of the map, some distortions are acceptable and others are not; therefore different map projections exist in order to preserve some properties of the sphere-like body at the expense of other properties. There is no limit to the number of possible map projections. More generally, the surfaces of planetary bodies can be mapped even if they are too irregular to be modeled well with a sphere or ellipsoid. Even more generally, projections are the subject of several pure mathematical fields, including differential geometry and projective geometry. However "map projection" refers specifically to a cartographic projection.

— Freebase

Equiareal map

Equiareal map

In differential geometry, an equiareal map is a smooth map from one surface to another that preserves the area of figures. If M and N are two surfaces in the Euclidean space R³, then an equi-areal map ƒ can be characterized by any of the following equivalent conditions: ⁕The surface area of ƒ is equal to the area of U for every open set U on M. ⁕The pullback of the area element μN on N is equal to μM, the area element on M. ⁕At each point p of M, and tangent vectors v and w to M at p, An example of an equiareal map, due to Archimedes of Syracuse, is the projection from the unit sphere x² + y² + z² = 1 to the unit cylinder x² + y² = 1 outward from their common axis. An explicit formula is for a point on the unit sphere. In the context of geographic maps, a map projection is called equiareal, or more commonly equi-area, if areas are preserved up to a constant factor; embedding the target map, usually considered a subset of R², in the obvious way in R³, the requirement above then is weakened to: for some κ > 0 not depending on and . For examples of such projections, see Equal-area map projections. Linear equi-areal maps are 2 × 2 real matrices making up the group SL of special linear transformations.

— Freebase

Chart

Chart

a map; esp., a hydrographic or marine map; a map on which is projected a portion of water and the land which it surrounds, or by which it is surrounded, intended especially for the use of seamen; as, the United States Coast Survey charts; the English Admiralty charts

— Webster Dictionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. decline
  • B. reject
  • C. admit
  • D. refuse