Synonyms containing major(ip)

We've found 10,828 synonyms:

Major

Major

mā′jur, adj. greater in number, quantity, or size: more important: (mus.) greater by a semitone.—n. a person of full age (21 years): an officer in rank between a captain and lieutenant-colonel.—v.i. to play the major, to talk big.—ns. Majorat (ma-zhō-rä′), primogeniture; Mā′jorate, Mā′jorship, the office or rank of major: majority; Mā′jor-dō′mo, an official who has the general management in a large household: a general steward: a chief minister (Sp. mayor-domo, a house-steward—L. major, greater, domus, a house); Mā′jor-gen′eral, an officer in the army next in rank below a lieutenant-general; Major′ity, the greater number: the amount between the greater and the less number: full age (at 21): the office or rank of major.—Major key (mus.), a key in which the semitones lie between the third and fourth, and seventh and eighth; Major premise (logic), the principal or major statement in a syllogism; Major scale (see Major key).—Go over to, or Join, the majority, to die; The majority, the Great majority, the dead. [L., comp. of magnus.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Ditone

Ditone

the Greek major third, which comprehend two major tones (the modern major third contains one major and one minor whole tone)

— Webster Dictionary

Dur

Dur

major; in the major mode; as, C dur, that is, C major

— Webster Dictionary

Major

Major

greater in number, quantity, or extent; as, the major part of the assembly; the major part of the revenue; the major part of the territory

— Webster Dictionary

Major chord

Major chord

In music theory, a major chord is a chord having a root, a major third, and a perfect fifth. When a chord has these three notes alone, it is called a major triad. Some major triads with additional notes, such as the major seventh chord, may also be called major chords. A major triad can also be described as a major third interval with a minor third interval on top or as a root note, a note 4 semitones higher than the root, and a note 7 semitones higher than the root. A minor chord differs from a major chord in having a minor third above the root instead of a major third. It can also be described as a minor third with a major third on top, in contrast to a major chord, which has a major third with a minor third on top. They both contain fifths, because a major third plus a minor third equals a fifth. An augmented chord is like a major chord, but with a raised fifth. An example of a major chord is the C major chord, which consists of the notes C, E and G. In just intonation a major chord is tuned to the frequency ratio 4:5:6. This may be found on I, IV, V, ♭VI, ♭III, and VI. In equal temperament it has 4 semitones between the root and third, 3 between the third and fifth, and 7 between the root and fifth. It is represented by the integer notation. In equal temperament, the fifth is only two cents narrower than the just perfect fifth, but the major third is noticeably different at about 14 cents wider.

— Freebase

major interval

major interval

an interval that is either a major second, major third, major sixth, or a major seventh

— Wiktionary

Major seventh

Major seventh

In classical music from Western culture, a seventh is a musical interval encompassing seven staff positions, and the major seventh is one of two commonly occurring sevenths. It is qualified as major because it is the larger of the two. The major seventh spans eleven semitones, its smaller counterpart being the minor seventh, spanning ten semitones. For example, the interval from C to B is a major seventh, as the note B lies eleven semitones above C, and there are seven staff positions from C to B. Diminished and augmented sevenths span the same number of staff positions, but consist of a different number of semitones. The easiest way to locate and identify the major seventh is from the octave rather than the unison, and it is suggested that one sings the octave first. For example, the most commonly cited example of a melody featuring a major seventh is the tonic-octave-major seventh of the opening to " Over the Rainbow". "Not many songwriters begin a melody with a major seventh interval; perhaps that's why there are few memorable examples." The major seventh occurs most commonly built on the root of major triads, resulting in the chord type also known as major seventh chord or major-major seventh chord: including I7 and IV7 in major. "Major seven chords add jazziness to a musical passage. Alone, a major seventh interval can sound ugly."

— Freebase

Charles's Wain

Charles's Wain

the group of seven stars, commonly called the Dipper, in the constellation Ursa Major, or Great Bear. See Ursa major, under Ursa

— Webster Dictionary

Dog

Dog

one of the two constellations, Canis Major and Canis Minor, or the Greater Dog and the Lesser Dog. Canis Major contains the Dog Star (Sirius)

— Webster Dictionary

Major

Major

that premise which contains the major term. It its the first proposition of a regular syllogism; as: No unholy person is qualified for happiness in heaven [the major]. Every man in his natural state is unholy [minor]. Therefore, no man in his natural state is qualified for happiness in heaven [conclusion or inference]

— Webster Dictionary

Scale

Scale

the graduated series of all the tones, ascending or descending, from the keynote to its octave; -- called also the gamut. It may be repeated through any number of octaves. See Chromatic scale, Diatonic scale, Major scale, and Minor scale, under Chromatic, Diatonic, Major, and Minor

— Webster Dictionary

Signature

Signature

the designation of the key (when not C major, or its relative, A minor) by means of one or more sharps or flats at the beginning of the staff, immediately after the clef, affecting all notes of the same letter throughout the piece or movement. Each minor key has the same signature as its relative major

— Webster Dictionary

Wagoner

Wagoner

the constellation Charles's Wain, or Ursa Major. See Ursa major, under Ursa

— Webster Dictionary

Relative key

Relative key

In music, relative keys are the major and minor scales that have the same key signatures. A major and minor scale sharing the same key signature are said to be in a relative relationship. The relative minor of a particular major key, or the relative major of a minor key, is the key which has the same key signature but a different tonic; this is as opposed to parallel minor or major, which shares the same tonic. Relative keys are closely related keys, in that they differ by no more than one accidental, the keys between which most modulations occur. The minor key starts three semitones below its relative major; for example, A minor is three semitones below its relative, C Major. G major and E minor both have a single sharp in their key signature at F♯; therefore, E minor is the relative minor of G major, and conversely G major is the relative major of E minor. The tonic of the relative minor is the sixth scale degree of the major scale, while the tonic of the relative major is the third degree of the minor scale. The relative relationship may be visualized through the circle of fifths. A complete list of relative minor/major pairs in order of the circle of fifths is:

— Freebase

major third

major third

A musical interval of the Western twelve-semitone system consisting of four semitones and spanning three degrees of the diatonic scale. Major scales are so named because of the major third interval between the tonic and mediant of a major tonic triad. It is enharmonically equivalent to a diminished fourth.

— Wiktionary

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym of "shopsoiled"?
  • A. new
  • B. hackneyed
  • C. commonplace
  • D. well-worn