Synonyms containing make busy

We've found 18,998 synonyms:

Make

Make

māk, v.t. to fashion, frame, or form: to produce: to bring about: to perform: to force: to render: to represent, or cause to appear to be: to turn: to occasion: to bring into any state or condition: to establish: to prepare: to obtain: to ascertain: to arrive in sight of: to reach: (B.) to be occupied with: to do.—v.i. to tend or move: to contribute: (B.) to feign or pretend:—pa.t. and pa.p. māde.—n. form or shape: structure, texture.—v.i. Make′-believe′, to pretend, feign.—n. a mere pretence.—ns. Make′-peace (Shak.), a peace-maker; Mak′er, one who makes: the Creator: a poet; Make′shift, something done or used to serve a shift or turn: something used only for a time.—adj. having the character of a temporary resource.—ns. Make′-up, the way anything is arranged: an actor's materials for personating a part: (print.) the arrangement of composed types into columns or pages, as in imposition; Make′-weight, that which is thrown into a scale to make up the weight: something of little value added to supply a deficiency; Mak′ing, the act of forming: structure: form.—Make account of (see Account); Make a figure, to be conspicuous; Make after, to follow or pursue; Make amends, to render compensation or satisfaction; Make as if, to act as if, to pretend that; Make at, to make a hostile movement against; Make away, to put out of the way, to destroy; Make away with, to squander; Make believe (see Believe); Make bold (see Bold); Make for, to move toward, to tend to the advantage of—so in B.; Make free with, to treat freely or without ceremony; Make good, to maintain, to justify, to fulfil; Make head against, to oppose successfully; Make light of (see Light); Make little of, to treat as insignificant; Make love to (see Love); Make much of, to treat with fondness, to cherish, to foster; Make no doubt, to have no doubt, to be confident; Make of, to understand by, to effect: to esteem; Make off with, to run away with; Make one's way, to proceed: to succeed; Make out, to discover: to prove: to furnish: to succeed; Make over, to remake, reconstruct: to transfer; Make pace, to increase the speed; Make sail, to increase the quantity of sail: to set sail; Make sure, to be certain of; Make sure of, to consider as certain, to secure to one's self; Make the most of, to use to the best advantage; Make up, to fabricate: to feign: to collect into one: to complete, supplement: to assume a particular form of features: to determine: to reckon: to make good: to repair: to harmonise, adjust; Make up for, to compensate; Make up to, to approach: to become friendly. [A.S. macian; Ger. machen.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Busy work

Busy work

Busy work can refer to activity that is undertaken to pass time and stay busy. In educational settings, busy work has precedence as a means to corroborate and reinforce lessons and curricula by allowing students time to practice new learned skill-sets independently. Busy work also occurs in business, military and other settings, in situations where people may be required to be present but may lack the opportunities, skills or need to do something more productive. People may engage in busy work to maintain an appearance of activity, in order to avoid criticism of being inactive or idle.

— Freebase

Busy signal

Busy signal

A busy signal in telephony is an audible or visual signal to the calling party that indicates failure to complete the requested connection of that particular telephone call. There are several distinctly different types of busy signals: ⁕a reorder tone, indicates that no transmission path to the called number is available. It is often played after a recording describing a telephone problem; ⁕an otherwise unspecified busy signal indicates that the called number is occupied, if that number is calling out, if someone else has called the number or is calling the number at the same time, if the other line was left off-hook or it is otherwise unavailable; ⁕this tone sometimes occurs at the end of a call to indicate the other party has hung up. See disconnect supervision. Countries have different signaling tones that act as "busy signals", in most cases consisting of a tone with equal on/off periods at a rate of between 60 and 120 interruptions per minute. In North America, the Precise Tone Plan used today employs two tones of 480 and 620 Hz at 60 i.p.m.. In the past, before the adoption of the PreciseTone system, busy signal was generally composed of the same tone as dial tone in the central office in question, interrupted at the same rate.

— Freebase

Busy

Busy

biz′i, adj. fully employed: active: diligent: meddling.—v.t. to make busy: to occupy:—pr.p. busying (biz′i-ing); pa.p. busied (biz′id).—adv. Bus′ily.—n. Bus′ybody, one busy about others' affairs, a meddling person.—adj. Bus′yless (Shak.), without business.—n. Bus′yness, state of being busy. [A.S. bysig.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Busy beaver

Busy beaver

In computability theory, a busy beaver is a Turing machine that attains the maximum number of steps performed or number of nonblank symbols finally on the tape among all Turing machines in a certain class. The Turing machines in this class must meet certain design specifications and are required to eventually halt after being started with a blank tape. A busy beaver function quantifies these upper limits on a given measure, and is a noncomputable function. In fact, a busy beaver function can be shown to grow faster asymptotically than does any computable function. The concept was first introduced by Tibor Radó as the "busy beaver game" in his 1962 paper, "On Non-Computable Functions".

— Freebase

busy

busy

To make somebody busy, to keep busy with, to occupy, to make occupied.

— Wiktionary

Mahamatra

Mahamatra

A Mahamatra (meaning ""Officer of high rank") was an "officer of morality" established by the Indian Emperor Ashoka (reigned 269-233 BCE). Their full title was Dhaṃma Mahāmātā, the "Inspectors of the Dharma". They were apparently a class of senior officials who were in charge various aspects of administration and justice.The Mahamatras are mentioned in several of the Edicts of Ashoka, inscribed on rocks or pillars. They seem to have been an essential part of his government.Some were called "Dharma-Mahamatras" ("Mahamatras of Virtue"), who seem to have been established in the 14th year of Ashoka's reign (256 BCE). There were also Amta-mahamatras in charge of foreigners, and Stri-adhyaksha- mahamatras, in charge of women. Devanampriya Priyadarsin speaks thus. Having in view this very (matter), I have set up pillars of morality, appointed Mahamatras of morality, (and) issued [proclamations] on morality. "In the past there were no dhamma Mahamatras but such officers were appointed by me thirteen years after my coronation. Now they work among all religions for the establishment of dhamma, for the promotion of Dhamma, and for the welfare and happiness of all who are devoted to dhamma. They work among the Greeks, the Kambojas, the Gandharas, the Rastrikas, the Pitinikas and other peoples on the western borders. Those who are content with their own religion should be told this: the beloved of the gods, King Piyadasi, does not value gifts and honors as much as he values that there should be growth in the essentials of all religions. And to this end many are working - Dhamma Mahamatras, Mahamatras in charge of the women's quarters, officers in charge of outlying areas, and other such officers. And the fruit of this is that one's own religion grows and the dhamma is illuminated also. "Those my Mahamatras of morality too are occupied with affairs of many kinds which are beneficial to ascetics as well as to householders, and they are occupied also with all sects. Some (Mahamatras) were ordered by me to busy themselves with the affairs of the Sangha; likewise others were ordered by me to busy themselves also with the Brahmanas (and) Ajivikas; others were ordered by me to busy themselves also with the Nirgranthas; others were ordered by me to busy themselves also with various (other) sects; (thus) different Mahamatras (are busying themselves) specially with different (congregations). But my Mahamatras of morality are occupied with these (congregations) as well as with all other sects.

— Wikipedia

Busy

Busy

to make or keep busy; to employ; to engage or keep engaged; to occupy; as, to busy one's self with books

— Webster Dictionary

Polling

Polling

Polling, or polled operation, in computer science, refers to actively sampling the status of an external device by a client program as a synchronous activity. Polling is most often used in terms of input/output, and is also referred to as polled I/O or software-driven I/O. Polling is sometimes used synonymously with busy-wait polling. In this situation, when an I/O operation is required, the computer does nothing other than check the status of the I/O device until it is ready, at which point the device is accessed. In other words, the computer waits until the device is ready. Polling also refers to the situation where a device is repeatedly checked for readiness, and if it is not, the computer returns to a different task. Although not as wasteful of CPU cycles as busy waiting, this is generally not as efficient as the alternative to polling, interrupt-driven I/O. In a simple single-purpose system, even busy-wait is perfectly appropriate if no action is possible until the I/O access, but more often than not this was traditionally a consequence of simple hardware or non-multitasking operating systems. Polling is often intimately involved with very low-level hardware. For example, polling a parallel printer port to check whether it is ready for another character involves examining as little as one bit of a byte. That bit represents, at the time of reading, whether a single wire in the printer cable is at low or high voltage. The I/O instruction that reads this byte directly transfers the voltage state of eight real world wires to the eight circuits that make up one byte of a CPU register.

— Freebase

Pragmatical

Pragmatical

busy; specifically, busy in an objectionable way; officious; fussy and positive; meddlesome

— Webster Dictionary

busy wait

busy wait

Used of human behavior, conveys that the subject is busy waiting for someone or something, intends to move instantly as soon as it shows up, and thus cannot do anything else at the moment. “Can't talk now, I'm busy-waiting till Bill gets off the phone.”Technically, busy-wait means to wait on an event by spinning through a tight or timed-delay loop that polls for the event on each pass, as opposed to setting up an interrupt handler and continuing execution on another part of the task. In applications this is a wasteful technique, and best avoided on timesharing systems where a busy-waiting program may hog the processor. However, it is often unavoidable in kernel programming. In the Linux world, kernel busy-waits are usually referred to as spinlocks.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Busy Bee

Busy Bee

Busy Bee of Norway, branded simply Busy Bee, was an airline that operated in Norway between 1966 and 1992. The airline was started by Braathens S.A.F.E under the name Busy Bee Air Service. The airline flew charter and wet lease for Braathens SAFE and Scandinavian Airlines with Fokker F-27, Fokker 50 and Boeing 737-200 aircraft. The airline was also for a period known as Air Executive Norway. Its head office was located on the grounds of Oslo Airport, Fornebu in Fornebu, Bærum.

— Freebase

Get Busy

Get Busy

"Get Busy" is a 2003 dancehall song by Jamaican dancehall reggae toaster Sean Paul, from his album Dutty Rock. The song was one of the many hits from the jumpy handclap riddim known as the Diwali Riddim, produced by then-newcomer Steven "Lenky" Marsden, and was the only song that never made the "Diwali" rhythm album on Greensleeves Records as it was more than likely a late entry. The lyrics encourage sexy club-going ladies to "get busy"... on the dancefloor, that is. Paul described it as "...mainly a party song. It's not all about smoking weed." "Get Busy" topped the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks from 10 May 2003, preceded by "In Da Club" by 50 Cent and followed by "21 Questions" by 50 Cent featuring Nate Dogg. It was performed live on Saturday Night Live in May 2003.

— Freebase

Bustle

Bustle

bus′l, v.i. to busy one's self noisily: to be active, often with more noise than actual work.—n. hurried activity: stir: tumult.—n. Bust′ler. [There is a M. E. bustelen, of doubtful relations; perh. conn. with bluster, or with Ice. bustl, a splash, or with A.S. bysig, busy.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Fiddle

Fiddle

fid′l, n. a stringed instrument of music, called also a Violin.—v.t. or v.i. to play on a fiddle: to be busy over trifles, to trifle:—pr.p. fidd′ling; pa.p. fidd′led.ns. Fidd′le-block, a long block having two sheaves of different diameters in the same plane; Fidd′le-bow, a bow strung with horse-hair, with which the strings of the fiddle are set vibrating.—interjs. Fidd′le-de-dee, Fidd′lestick (often pl.), nonsense!—v.i. Fidd′le-fadd′le, to trifle, to dally.—n. trifling talk.—adj. fussy, trifling.—interj. nonsense!—n. Fidd′le-fadd′ler.—adj. Fidd′le-fadd′ling.—ns. Fidd′le-head, an ornament at a ship's bow, over the cut-water, consisting of a scroll turning aft or inward; Fidd′ler, one who fiddles: a small crab of genus Gelasimus; Fidd′le-string, a string for a fiddle; Fidd′le-wood, a tropical American tree yielding valuable hard wood.—adj. Fidd′ling, trifling, busy about trifles.—Fiddler's green, a sailor's name for a place of frolic on shore.—Play first, or second, fiddle, to take the part of the first, or second, violin-player in an orchestra: to take a leading, or a subordinate, part in anything; Scotch fiddle, the itch. [A.S. fiðele; Ger. fiedel. See Violin.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. harmlessly
  • B. harmfully
  • C. noxiously
  • D. detrimentally