Synonyms containing make copious or diffuse

We've found 18,879 synonyms:

Make

Make

māk, v.t. to fashion, frame, or form: to produce: to bring about: to perform: to force: to render: to represent, or cause to appear to be: to turn: to occasion: to bring into any state or condition: to establish: to prepare: to obtain: to ascertain: to arrive in sight of: to reach: (B.) to be occupied with: to do.—v.i. to tend or move: to contribute: (B.) to feign or pretend:—pa.t. and pa.p. māde.—n. form or shape: structure, texture.—v.i. Make′-believe′, to pretend, feign.—n. a mere pretence.—ns. Make′-peace (Shak.), a peace-maker; Mak′er, one who makes: the Creator: a poet; Make′shift, something done or used to serve a shift or turn: something used only for a time.—adj. having the character of a temporary resource.—ns. Make′-up, the way anything is arranged: an actor's materials for personating a part: (print.) the arrangement of composed types into columns or pages, as in imposition; Make′-weight, that which is thrown into a scale to make up the weight: something of little value added to supply a deficiency; Mak′ing, the act of forming: structure: form.—Make account of (see Account); Make a figure, to be conspicuous; Make after, to follow or pursue; Make amends, to render compensation or satisfaction; Make as if, to act as if, to pretend that; Make at, to make a hostile movement against; Make away, to put out of the way, to destroy; Make away with, to squander; Make believe (see Believe); Make bold (see Bold); Make for, to move toward, to tend to the advantage of—so in B.; Make free with, to treat freely or without ceremony; Make good, to maintain, to justify, to fulfil; Make head against, to oppose successfully; Make light of (see Light); Make little of, to treat as insignificant; Make love to (see Love); Make much of, to treat with fondness, to cherish, to foster; Make no doubt, to have no doubt, to be confident; Make of, to understand by, to effect: to esteem; Make off with, to run away with; Make one's way, to proceed: to succeed; Make out, to discover: to prove: to furnish: to succeed; Make over, to remake, reconstruct: to transfer; Make pace, to increase the speed; Make sail, to increase the quantity of sail: to set sail; Make sure, to be certain of; Make sure of, to consider as certain, to secure to one's self; Make the most of, to use to the best advantage; Make up, to fabricate: to feign: to collect into one: to complete, supplement: to assume a particular form of features: to determine: to reckon: to make good: to repair: to harmonise, adjust; Make up for, to compensate; Make up to, to approach: to become friendly. [A.S. macian; Ger. machen.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Copious

Copious

Copious is a social marketplace for buying from and selling to people, not strangers. Copious is backed by Foundation Capital, Embarcadero Ventures, Relay Ventures, Google Ventures and a handful of well known Silicon Valley angels. Copious is based in San Francisco and is a project of Utah Street Labs.

— CrunchBase

Diffuse

Diffuse

poured out; widely spread; not restrained; copious; full; esp., of style, opposed to concise or terse; verbose; prolix; as, a diffuse style; a diffuse writer

— Webster Dictionary

Diffuse reflection

Diffuse reflection

Diffuse reflection is the reflection of light from a surface such that an incident ray is reflected at many angles rather than at just one angle as in the case of specular reflection. An illuminated ideal diffuse reflecting surface will have equal luminance from all directions which lie in the half-space adjacent to the surface. A surface built from a non-absorbing powder such as plaster, or from fibers such as paper, or from a polycrystalline material such as white marble, reflects light diffusely with great efficiency. Many common materials exhibit a mixture of specular and diffuse reflection. The visibility of objects, excluding light-emitting ones, is primarily caused by diffuse reflection of light: it is diffusely-scattered light that forms the image of the object in the observer's eye.

— Freebase

voluminous

voluminous

Having written much, or produced many volumes; copious; diffuse; as, a voluminous writer.

— Wiktionary

Diffusive

Diffusive

having the quality of diffusing; capable of spreading every way by flowing; spreading widely; widely reaching; copious; diffuse

— Webster Dictionary

Voluminous

Voluminous

having written much, or produced many volumes; copious; diffuse; as, a voluminous writer

— Webster Dictionary

Diffuse

Diffuse

dif-ūs′, adj. diffused: widely spread: wordy: not concise.—adv. Diffuse′ly.—n. Diffuse′ness.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Central chemoreceptors

Central chemoreceptors

Central chemoreceptors of the central nervous system, located on the ventrolateral medullary surface in the vicinity of the exit of the 9th and 10th cranial nerves, are sensitive to the pH of their environment. These act to detect the changes in pH of nearby cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that are indicative of altered oxygen or carbon dioxide concentrations available to brain tissues. An increase in carbon dioxide causes tension of the arteries, often resulting from decreased CO2 output (hypercapnia), indirectly causes the blood to become more acidic; the cerebrospinal fluid pH is closely comparable to plasma, as carbon dioxide easily diffuses across the blood–brain barrier. However, a change in plasma pH alone will not stimulate central chemoreceptors as H+ are not able to diffuse across the blood–brain barrier into the CSF. Only CO2 levels affect this as it can diffuse across, reacting with H2O to form carbonic acid and thus decrease pH. Central chemoreception remains, in this way, distinct from peripheral chemoreceptors. The central chemoreception system has also been shown experimentally to respond to hypercapnic hypoxia (elevated CO2, decreased O2) and aqueous sodium cyanide injection into the whole animal and in vitro slice preparation. These methods can be used to mimic some forms of hypoxic hypoxia and they are currently being studied including the detection of variation in arterial CO2 tension acting as a quick-response-system for short term (or emergency) regulation. This system utilizes a negative feedback system, therefore if the pH of the cerebral spinal fluid does not compare to an ideal “set” level, then the receptor will send an error signal to the effectors and appropriate action may be executed. Peripheral chemoreceptors (carotid and aortic bodies) and central chemoreceptors (medullary neurons) primarily function to regulate respiratory activity. This is an important mechanism for maintaining arterial blood pO2, pCO2, and pH within appropriate physiological ranges. For example, a fall in arterial pO2 (hypoxemia) or an increase in arterial pCO2 (hypercapnia) leads to an increase in the rate and depth of respiration through activation of the chemoreceptor reflex. Chemoreceptor activity, however, also affects cardiovascular function either directly (by interacting with medullary vasomotor centers) or indirectly (via altered pulmonary stretch receptor activity). Respiratory arrest and circulatory shock (these conditions decrease arterial pO2 and pH, and increase arterial pCO2) dramatically increase chemoreceptor activity leading to enhanced sympathetic outflow to the heart and vasculature via activation of the vasomotor center in the medulla.

— Wikipedia

Esophageal spasm

Esophageal spasm

Esophageal spasm is a disorder of motility of the esophagus.There are two types of esophageal spasm: Diffuse or distal esophageal spasm (DES), where there is uncoordinated esophageal contractions Nutcracker esophagus (NE) also known as hypertensive peristalsis, where the contractions are coordinated but with an excessive amplitude.Both conditions are linked to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). DES and nutcracker esophagus present similarly and can may require esophageal manometry for differentiation.When the coordinated muscle contraction are irregular or uncoordinated, this condition may be called diffuse esophageal spasm. These spasms can prevent food from reaching the stomach where food gets stuck in the esophagus. At other times the coordinated muscle contraction is very powerful, which is called nutcracker esophagus. These contractions move food through the esophagus but can cause severe pain.

— Wikipedia

Acroosteolysis

Acroosteolysis

Acroosteolysis is resorption of the distal bony phalanges. Acroosteolysis has two patterns of resorption in adults: diffuse and bandlike. The diffuse pattern of resorption has a widely diverse differential diagnosis which includes: pyknodysostosis, collagen vascular disease and vasculitis, Raynaud's neuropathy, trauma, epidermolysis bullosa, psoriasis, frostbite, sarcoidosis, hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, acromegaly, and advanced leprosy.The bandlike pattern of resorption may be seen with polyvinyl chloride exposure and Hadju-Cheney syndrome.A mnemonic commonly used for acro-osteolysis is PINCHFO.Pyknodysostosis, Psoriasis, Injury (thermal burn, frostbite), Neuropathy (diabetes), Collagen vascular disease (scleroderma, Raynaud's), Hyperparathyroidism, Familial (Hadju-Cheney, progeria), Occupational (polyvinyl exposure), Acroosteolysis may be associated with minimal skin changes or with ischemic skin lesions that may result in digital necrosis.

— Wikipedia

osmotic pressure

osmotic pressure

The pressure which a solution of a substance in a liquid exerts on a semipermeable membrane, through which the solvent can diffuse but the dissolved substance (the solute) cannot diffuse, when separated across the membrane from the pure solvent. In general, the osmotic pressure will depend almost proportionally up to certain concentrations upon the molal concentration of the solute.

— GCIDE

Nebula

Nebula

(Astron.) A faint, cloudlike, self-luminous mass of matter situated beyond the solar system among the stars. The term was originally applied to any diffuse luminous region. Now, technically, it is applied to interstellar clouds of dust and gases (diffuse nebula). However distant galaxies and very distant star clusters often appear like them in the telescope, such as the spiral nebula in Andromeda, known now to be a distant galaxy.

— GCIDE

Tristia

Tristia

The Tristia ("Sorrows" or "Lamentations") is a collection of letters written in elegiac couplets by the Augustan poet Ovid during his exile from Rome. Despite five books of his copious bewailing of his fate, the immediate cause of Augustus's banishment of the most acclaimed living Latin poet to Pontus in AD 8 remains a mystery. In addition to the Tristia, Ovid wrote another collection of elegiac epistles on his exile, the Epistulae ex Ponto. He spent several years in the outpost of Tomis and died without ever returning to Rome. The Tristia was once viewed unfavorably in Ovid's oeuvre but has become the subject of scholarly interest in recent years.

— Wikipedia

Dan Humphrey

Dan Humphrey

Daniel Randolph Humphrey is a fictional character in the best selling Gossip Girl (novel series). He is one of the central male characters in Gossip Girl, where he is portrayed by Penn Badgley. Dan Humphrey is the son of Rufus Humphrey and has a younger sister, Jenny Humphrey, while his mother remains absent for the majority of the series. Dan and his family live in Brooklyn, the alternative of the old-moneyed and conservative Upper East Side. He attends St. Jude's Preparatory School for Boys on the West Side as a scholarship student. His life changed dramatically when his father, Rufus Humphrey, married the wealthy Lily van der Woodsen, moving the family to the Upper East Side. He is described as being attractive and sensitive, loves to write poetry, and one of his poems, "Sluts," was featured in The New Yorker. He revealed his favorite word is "death" and drinks copious amounts of dark coffee. He overanalyzes and is easily frustrated. Dan is very close and protective of little sister Jenny who attends an exclusive private school, called the Constance Billard School for Girls, a small, elite, all-girls' school located at 93rd Street and Madison Avenue.

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is an antonym of "grievous"?
  • A. trifling
  • B. deplorable
  • C. baleful
  • D. afflictive