Synonyms containing morne

We've found 11 synonyms:

Laudat

Laudat

Laudat is a small village in the interior of Dominica, located between 3 mountains: Morne Watt, Morne Micotrine (Morne Mackak), and Morne Trois Pitons. With a population of just above 300 persons, Laudat is referred to as a "gateway" because it is the sole entry point to many of the islands sights, including the Boiling Lake, Fresh Water Lake, and Titou Gorge. Perched about 1200 feet above sea level Laudat has a cool climate and views of the Caribbean Sea. It is located approximately 20 minutes from the capital, Roseau and is at the end of the road (there is no alternative but to turn around to exit). The road to Laudat used to be a hair-raising ride up the mountains, around blind hairpin turns with sharp drop-offs into the jungle canopy; however, the road has been improved and may be completed by the time of this writing. Laudat has seen many changes over the past years, including the aerial tram taking visitors from the village up into the high mountains--making possible what was previously a journey by foot. Titou Gorge was also altered over the last decade, and is now smaller and more developed. It is still a swimming place, and small waterfalls of hot and cold water stream into the gorge. There are some overnight accommodations available in the village. There are also a few small shops of the kind typically found throughout the Caribbean; rum, soft drinks and a few grocery and household items can be found. Laudat receives some of the highest rainfalls in the Caribbean, about 900 cm a year. The air is often misty and cool - a change from the heat of lower-lying areas.

— Wikipedia

Dominica

Dominica

Dominica, officially the Commonwealth of Dominica, is an island nation in the Lesser Antilles region of the Caribbean Sea, south-southeast of Guadeloupe and northwest of Martinique. Its size is 750 square kilometres and the highest point in the country is Morne Diablotins, which has an elevation of 1,447 metres. The Commonwealth of Dominica had a population of 71,293 at the 2011 Census. The capital is Roseau which is located on the leeward side of the island. Dominica has been nicknamed the "Nature Isle of the Caribbean" for its unspoiled natural beauty. It is the youngest island in the Lesser Antilles, still being formed by geothermal-volcanic activity, as evidenced by the world's second-largest hot spring, Boiling Lake. The island features lush mountainous rainforests, home of many rare plant, animal, and bird species. There are xeric areas in some of the western coastal regions, but heavy rainfall can be expected inland. The Sisserou Parrot, the island's national bird, is featured on the national flag. Dominica's economy is heavily dependent on both tourism and agriculture.

— Freebase

Roseau

Roseau

Roseau is the capital and largest city of Dominica. With a population of 16,582. it is a small and compact urban settlement, located within the Saint George parish and surrounded by the Caribbean Sea, the Roseau River and Morne Bruce. Built on the site of the ancient Kalinago Indian village of Sairi, it is the oldest and most important urban settlement on the island of Dominica. It is located on the west coast of Dominica, and is a combination of modern and colonial architecture. Roseau is Dominica's most important port for foreign trade. Some exports include bananas, bay oil, vegetables, grapefruit, oranges, and cocoa. The service sector is also a large part of the local economy. There is a prominent diocese called Roman Catholic Diocese of Roseau.

— Freebase

Grande-Terre

Grande-Terre

Grande-Terre Island is the name of the eastern-half of Guadeloupe proper, in the Lesser Antilles. It is separated from the other half of Guadeloupe island, Basse-Terre, by a narrow sea channel called Rivière Salée. Pointe de la Grande Vigie, in Grande-Terre, is the northernmost point of Guadeloupe island. Despite its name, Grande-Terre is smaller than Basse-Terre Island. It was called like that, in contrast with the much smaller Petite Terre Islands, two very small islands located about 10 km south-east of the Grande-Terre. Grande-Terre's indented coastline is surrounded by coral reefs and the island itself is a limestone plateau. Its surface is a series of rolling hills, white sand beaches and cliffs. The island's beaches consist of both white and black sands, as well as beaches of golden sand. Of the two islands, Grande-Terre is home to the majority of Guadeloupe's farmlands and tourist resorts. The island has a land area of 586.68 km². At the 2006 census the population of Grande-Terre was 197,603 inhabitants living in 10 communes. The population density was 337 inhabitants per km². The most populated communes are, in descending order of population, Les Abymes, Le Gosier, Pointe-à-Pitre, Le Moule, Sainte-Anne, and Morne-à-l'Eau.

— Freebase

Morne

Morne

mōrn, n. the blunt head of a jousting-lance: a small, rounded hill.—adjs. Morné (mōr-nā′), denoting a lion rampant without teeth or claws; Morned (her.), blunted. [Fr.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Laborie

Laborie

Laborie is a village on the south coast of Saint Lucia. It was originally called l'Islet a Caret after the Loggerhead sea turtles that were found in the area. The name Laborie is named after Baron de Laborie who was the French governor of Saint Lucia from 1784–1789. At that time the village had a population of 712. The French introduced large estates to the island and after the British took control of the island in 1814, many French landowners remained on their estates. In 1838 the first school was opened. Known as the "Mico School" because it was opened and operated by the Lady Mico Trust, it had 80 pupils and lasted until 1891. By this time a Catholic school had opened in the village. In 1907, the 18th Century church was replaced by a larger church which opened in 1914. During World War II, American forces opened a radar station on the hill of Morne le Blanc to help protect the airfield that is now Hewanorra International Airport. The remnants are still visible today. The Creole heritage is still visible today, both in the local culture and in the Saint Lucian Creole French language that is still widely spoken.

— Wikipedia

Abricots

Abricots

Abricots (Haitian Creole: Abriko) is a commune in the Jérémie Arrondissement, in the Grand'Anse department of Haiti. Villages located within the municipality include: Abricots, Anse du Clerc, Anse Josep, L'Homond, Latitte, Louissant, Morne Bijote, Poyrette, Sajote, and Saint-Victor

— Wikipedia

Soucis

Soucis

Soucis is a town on the island of Saint Lucia; it is located on the western side of the island, near Morne Fortune.

— Wikipedia

Morne-à-l'Eau

Morne-à-l'Eau

Morne-à-l'Eau (Monalô in creole) is a commune located in the department of Guadeloupe.

— Wikipedia

Maraval

Maraval

Maraval is one of the northern suburbs of Trinidad's capital, Port of Spain, a valley in northern Trinidad in Trinidad and Tobago. It is situated at the bottom of the hills of Paramin and located east of the Diego Martin valley to which it is connected directly by Morne Coco Road, and west of Santa Cruz valley, to which it is connected by Saddle Road.

— Wikipedia

mortne

mortne

See Morne.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. certain
  • B. dicey
  • C. iffy
  • D. chancy