Synonyms containing mould brush on gel

We've found 968 synonyms:

Toilet brush

Toilet brush

A toilet brush is a domestic implement designed for the cleaning of the lavatory pan. The modern plastic version was invented in 1932 by William C. Schopp of Huntington Park, California, US and later patented in 1933 by The Addis Brush Company. Generally the toilet brush is used with toilet cleaner or bleach. The toilet brush can be used to clean the upper area of the toilet, around the bowl. However, it cannot be used to clean very far into the toilet's U-bend and should not be used to clean the toilet seat. In many cultures it is considered impolite to clean away biological debris without the use of chemical toilet cleaning products, as this can potentially leave residue on the bristles. By contrast, others consider it impolite not to clean away biological debris immediately using the toilet brush. A typical toilet brush consists of a hard bristled end, usually with a rounded shape and a long handle. Today toilet brushes are commonly made of plastic, but were originally made of wood with pig bristles or from the hair of horses, oxen, squirrels and badgers. The brush is typically stored in a holder, but in some cases completely hidden in a tube. An electric toilet brush is a little different than a normal toilet brush. The bristles are fastened on the rotor of a motor which works similar to an electric tooth brush. The power supply is attached without any metal contact via electromagnetic induction. In recent years, there has been a general shift in design with a new emphasis on ergonomically designed brushes. Further design enhancements have included innovative holders that snap shut around the bristled end, thereby preventing the release of smells, germs and other unpleasantries.

— Freebase

Mould

Mould

mōld, n. dust: soil rich in decayed matter: the matter of which anything is composed: a minute fungus which grows on bodies in a damp atmosphere, so named from often growing on mould: the earth, the ground, the grave, esp. in pl. Mools (Scot.).—v.t. to cover with mould or soil: to cause to become mouldy.—v.i. to become mouldy.—n. Mould′-board, the curved plate in a plough which turns over the furrow.—v.i. Mould′er, to crumble to mould: to turn to dust: to waste away gradually.—v.t. to turn to dust.—ns. Mould′iness; Mould′warp, the mole, which casts up little heaps of mould.—adj. Mould′y, overgrown with mould. [A.S. molde; Ger. mull, Goth. mulda.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mould

Mould

mōld, n. a hollow form in which anything is cast: a pattern; the form received from a mould, a former or matrix for jellies, &c., also a dish shaped in such: character.—v.t. to form in a mould: to knead, as dough.—adj. Mould′able, that may be moulded.—ns. Mould′-box, a box in which molten steel is hydraulically compressed; Mould′er; Mould′-fac′ing, a fine powder or wash applied to the face of a mould to ensure a smooth casting; Mould′ing, the process of shaping, esp. any soft substance: anything formed by or in a mould: an ornamental edging on a picture-frame, &c., or (archit.) raised above or sunk below the surface of a wall, on cornices, jambs, lintels, &c.—the fillet or list, astragal or bead, ogee, cyma, &c.; Moulding-tā′ble, a table on which a potter moulds his ware; Mould′-loft, a large room in a shipbuilding yard in which the several parts of a ship's hull are laid off to full size from the construction drawings.—Moulding machine, a machine for making wood-mouldings; Moulding plane, a plane used in forming mouldings, a match-plane; Moulding sand, a mixture of sand and loam used by founders in making sand-moulds. [Fr. moule—L. modulus, a measure.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Drybrush

Drybrush

Drybrush is a painting technique in which a paint brush that is relatively dry, but still holds paint, is used. Load is applied to a dry support such as paper or primed canvas. The resulting brush strokes have a characteristic scratchy look that lacks the smooth appearance that washes or blended paint commonly have. The drybrush technique can be achieved with both water-based and oil-based media. With water-based media such as inks, acrylic paints, tempera paints or watercolor paints, the brush should be dry or squeezed dry of all water. The brush should then be loaded with paint that is highly viscous or thick. The loaded brush should then be applied to a dry support. With other water-based media, the brush should be loaded with paint then squeezed dry. With oil-based media, such as oil paint, a similar technique may be used, although instead of water, the brush should be dry or squeezed dry of oil and solvent. Because oil paint has a longer drying time than water-based media, brushing over or blending drybrush strokes should be avoided to preserve the distinctive look of the drybrush technique. The technique is frequently used in model painting to apply highlights to miniatures. Oil-based drybrushing can also be scrubbed onto paper, canvas or absorbent gesso with stiff bristle brushes to impart smooth airbrushed or pastel-style effects. Next is that drybrush is sometimes mixed with other painting techniques Coming from the dry brush technique, an autonomous painting technique developed in a comparatively short time:

— Wikipedia

Brush

Brush

brush, n. an instrument for removing dust, usually made of bristles, twigs, feathers, or stiff grass stems: a kind of hair-pencil used by painters: a painter, one who uses the brush: brushwood: a skirmish or encounter: the tail of a fox: (elect.) a brush-like discharge of sparks: one of the bundles of copper wires or flexible strips in contact with the commutator of the armature on opposite sides, and which carry off the positive and negative currents of electricity generated.—v.t. to remove dust, &c., from by sweeping: to touch lightly in passing: remove (with off): to thrash.—v.i. to move over lightly: to make off with a rush.—n. Brush′ing, the act of rubbing or sweeping.—adj. in a lively manner: brisk.—ns. Brush′-wheel, a wheel used in light machinery to turn another by having the rubbing surface covered with stiff hairs or bristles; Brush′wood, rough close bushes: a thicket.—adj. Brush′y, rough, rugged.—To brush up, to brighten, revive. [O. Fr. brosse, a brush, brushwood—Low L. bruscia; Diez connects the Fr. with Old High Ger. burst, bursta, bristle.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sephadex

Sephadex

Sephadex is a trademark for cross-linked dextran gel used for gel filtration. It was launched by Pharmacia in 1959, after development work by Jerker Porath and Per Flodin. The name is derived from separation Pharmacia dextran. It is normally manufactured in a bead form and most commonly used for gel filtration columns. By varying the degree of cross-linking, the fractionation properties of the gel can be altered. These highly specialized gel filtration and chromatographic media are composed of macroscopic beads synthetically derived from the polysaccharide dextran. The organic chains are cross-linked to give a three-dimensional network having functional ionic groups attached by ether linkages to glucose units of the polysaccharide chains. Available forms include anion and cation exchangers, as well as gel filtration resins, with varying degrees of porosity; bead sizes fall in discrete ranges between 20 and 300 µm. Sephadex is also used for ion-exchange chromatography.

— Wikipedia

Gel electrophoresis

Gel electrophoresis

Gel electrophoresis is a method for separation and analysis of macromolecules and their fragments, based on their size and charge. It is used in clinical chemistry to separate proteins by charge and/or size and in biochemistry and molecular biology to separate a mixed population of DNA and RNA fragments by length, to estimate the size of DNA and RNA fragments or to separate proteins by charge. Nucleic acid molecules are separated by applying an electric field to move the negatively charged molecules through an agarose matrix. Shorter molecules move faster and migrate farther than longer ones because shorter molecules migrate more easily through the pores of the gel. This phenomenon is called sieving. Proteins are separated by charge in agarose because the pores of the gel are too large to sieve proteins. Gel electrophoresis can also be used for separation of nanoparticles. Gel electrophoresis uses a gel as an anticonvective medium and/or sieving medium during electrophoresis, the movement of a charged particle in an electrical field. Gels suppress the thermal convection caused by application of the electric field, and can also act as a sieving medium, retarding the passage of molecules; gels can also simply serve to maintain the finished separation, so that a post electrophoresis stain can be applied. DNA Gel electrophoresis is usually performed for analytical purposes, often after amplification of DNA via PCR, but may be used as a preparative technique prior to use of other methods such as mass spectrometry, RFLP, PCR, cloning, DNA sequencing, or Southern blotting for further characterization.

— Freebase

Ice pack

Ice pack

An ice pack or gel pack is a plastic sac of ice, refrigerant gel or liquid, or, in an emergency, even frozen vegetables. The refrigerant, usually non-toxic, can absorb a considerable amount of heat, since its enthalpy of fusion is high. It is commonly used as a cold compress to alleviate the pain of minor injuries or in coolers or insulated shipping containers to keep products cool during transport. The simplest type of ice pack is simply a sack, bag or towel filled with cubed or crushed ice. Ice packs are used in coolers to keep perishable foods below the 41–165 °F danger zone when outside a refrigerator or freezer. The amount of ice needed to cool a given mass of food varies greatly, depending on the initial temperature of the food, the temperature, solidity, and mass of the ice used, the insulating value of the container both are put into, the ambient temperature around the container, and whether it is exposed to direct sunlight or kept in the shade. Water has an unusually high enthalpy of fusion and a convenient melting temperature. However it isn't ideal for ice packs for various reasons, so additives to improve the properties of water are often used. For example, substances can be added to prevent bacterial growth in the pack, as can additives that cause the water to remain a thick gel throughout use, instead of transitioning between a solid and a free-flowing liquid like plain water. These gel packs are often made of non-toxic materials that will not liquefy, and therefore will not spill easily or cause contamination if the container breaks. Gel packs may be made by adding hydroxyethyl cellulose or vinyl-coated silica gel.

— Freebase

Gel electrophoresis of nucleic acids

Gel electrophoresis of nucleic acids

Nucleic acid electrophoresis is an analytical technique used to separate DNA or RNA fragments by size and reactivity. Nucleic acid molecules which are to be analyzed are set upon a viscous medium, the gel, where an electric field induces the nucleic acids to migrate toward the anode, due to the net negative charge of the sugar-phosphate backbone of the nucleic acid chain. The separation of these fragments is accomplished by exploiting the mobilities with which different sized molecules are able to pass through the gel. Longer molecules migrate more slowly because they experience more resistance within the gel. Because the size of the molecule affects its mobility, smaller fragments end up nearer to the anode than longer ones in a given period. After some time, the voltage is removed and the fragmentation gradient is analyzed. For larger separations between similar sized fragments, either the voltage or run time can be increased. Extended runs across a low voltage gel yield the most accurate resolution. Voltage is, however, not the sole factor in determining electrophoresis of nucleic acids. The nucleic acid to be separated can be prepared in several ways before separation by electrophoresis. In the case of large DNA molecules, the DNA is frequently cut into smaller fragments using a DNA restriction endonuclease. In other instances, such as PCR amplified samples, enzymes present in the sample that might affect the separation of the molecules are removed through various means before analysis. Once the nucleic acid is properly prepared, the samples of the nucleic acid solution are placed in the wells of the gel and a voltage is applied across the gel for a specified amount of time.

— Freebase

Injection moulding

Injection moulding

Injection moulding is a manufacturing process for producing parts by injecting molten material into a mould. Injection moulding can be performed with a host of materials mainly including metals (for which the process is called die-casting), glasses, elastomers, confections, and most commonly thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers. Material for the part is fed into a heated barrel, mixed (Using a helical shaped screw), and injected (Forced) into a mould cavity, where it cools and hardens to the configuration of the cavity. After a product is designed, usually by an industrial designer or an engineer, moulds are made by a mould-maker (or toolmaker) from metal, usually either steel or aluminium, and precision-machined to form the features of the desired part. Injection moulding is widely used for manufacturing a variety of parts, from the smallest components to entire body panels of cars. Advances in 3D printing technology, using photopolymers which do not melt during the injection moulding of some lower temperature thermoplastics, can be used for some simple injection moulds. Parts to be injection moulded must be very carefully designed to facilitate the moulding process; the material used for the part, the desired shape and features of the part, the material of the mould, and the properties of the moulding machine must all be taken into account. The versatility of injection moulding is facilitated by this breadth of design considerations and possibilities.

— Wikipedia

Brush border

Brush border

A brush border is the name for the microvilli-covered surface of simple cuboidal epithelium and simple columnar epithelium cells found in certain locations of the body. Microvilli are approximately 100 nanometers in diameter and their length varies from approximately 100 to 2,000 nanometers in length. Because individual microvilli are so small and are tightly packed in the brush border, individual microvilli can only be resolved using electron microscopes; with a light microscope they can usually only be seen collectively as a fuzzy fringe at the surface of the epithelium. This fuzzy appearance gave rise to the term brush border, as early anatomists noted that this structure appeared very much like the bristles of a paintbrush. Brush border cells are found in two main locations: ⁕The small intestine tract: This is where absorption takes place. The brush borders of the intestinal lining are the site of terminal carbohydrate digestions. The microvilli that constitute the brush border have enzymes for this final part of digestion anchored into their apical plasma membrane as integral membrane proteins. These enzymes are found near to the transporters that will then allow absorption of the digested nutrients.

— Freebase

Pastry brush

Pastry brush

A pastry brush, also known as a basting brush, is a cooking utensil used to spread butter, oil or glaze on food. Traditional pastry brushes are made with natural bristles or a plastic or nylon fiber similar to a paint brush, while modern kitchen brushes may have silicone bristles. In baking breads and pastries, a pastry brush is used to spread a glaze or egg wash on the crust or surface of the food. In roasting meats, a pastry brush may be used to sop up juices or drippings from under pan and spread them on the surface of the meat to crisp the skin.

— Wikipedia

lost wax

lost wax

A method of casting a sculpture in which a model of the sculpture is made from wax; the model is used to make a mould; when the mould has set, the wax is made to melt and is poured away, leaving the mould ready to be used to cast the sculpture.

— Wiktionary

Silica gel

Silica gel

Silica gel is a granular, vitreous, porous form of silicon dioxide made synthetically from sodium silicate. Silica gel is tough and hard; it is more solid than common household gels like gelatin or agar. It is a naturally occurring mineral that is purified and processed into either granular or beaded form. As a desiccant, it has an average pore size of 2.4 nanometers and has a strong affinity for water molecules. Silica gel is most commonly encountered in everyday life as beads in a small paper packet. In this form, it is used as a desiccant to control local humidity to avoid spoilage or degradation of some goods. Because silica gel can have added chemical indicators and absorbs moisture very well, silica gel packets usually bear warnings for the user not to eat the contents.

— Freebase

Modulate.

Modulate.

Modulate is Bob Mould's fifth solo album, released in 2002. Although a few tracks on his previous release, The Last Dog and Pony Show, had featured tape loops and samples, Mould shocked his fans with such a dramatic embrace of electronica. Rolling Stone magazine awarded the album 2½ stars out of five, declaring: "Ultimately, this is a rock record with electronic effects, not a techno record with guitars, and it falls short of being totally satisfying as either." The record includes the song "The Receipt," which City Pages observed "can be taken as a barely veiled attack on Mould's old Husker Dü-mate Grant Hart." Mould dubbed the tour supporting this album "The Carnival of Light and Sound." It featured him performing alone on stage, backed by prerecorded tracks as short films were projected on screens behind him.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. merge
  • B. combine
  • C. defuse
  • D. aggregate