Synonyms containing move the goal posts

We've found 87,651 synonyms:

Head

Head

hed, n. the uppermost or foremost part of an animal's body: the brain: the understanding: a chief or leader: the place of honour or command: the front or top of anything: an individual animal or person: a topic or chief point of a discourse: a title, heading: the source or spring: height of the source of water: highest point of anything: culmination: a cape: strength: a froth on beer, porter, &c., when poured into a glass.—v.t. to act as a head to, to lead or govern: to go in front of: to commence: to check: (naut.) to be contrary: (obs.) to behead.—v.i. to grow to a head: to originate: to go head foremost.—n. Head′ache, an internal pain in the head.—adj. Head′achy, afflicted with headaches.—ns. Head′band, a band or fillet for the head: the band at each end of a book: a thin slip of iron on the tympan of a printing-press; Head′-block, in a sawmill carriage, a cross-block on which the head of the log rests: a piece of wood in a carriage, connected with the spring and the perches, and joining the fore-gear and the hind-gear; Head′-board, a board placed at the head of anything, esp. a bedstead; Head′-boom, a jib-boom or a flying jib-boom; Head′bor′ough, an old term for the head of a borough, the chief of a frank pledge, tithing, or decennary; Head′-boy, the senior boy in a public school; Head′chair, a high-backed chair with a rest for the head; Head′-cheese, pork-cheese, brawn; Head′-chute, a canvas tube used to convey refuse matter from a ship's bows down to the water; Head′-cloth, a piece of cloth covering the head, wound round a turban, &c.; Head′-dress, an ornamental dress or covering for the head, worn by women.—p.adj. Head′ed, having a head: (Shak.) come to a head.—ns. Head′er, one who puts a head on something: a dive, head foremost, into water: a brick laid lengthwise along the thickness of a wall, serving as a bond: a heavy stone extending through the thickness of a wall; Head′-fast, a rope at the bows of a ship used to fasten it to a wharf, &c.; Head′-frame, the structure over a mine-shaft supporting the head-gear or winding machinery; Head′-gear, gear, covering, or ornament of the head; Head′-hunt′ing, the practice among the Dyaks of Borneo, &c., of making raids to procure human heads for trophies, &c.—adv. Head′ily.—ns. Head′iness; Head′ing, the act of furnishing with a head; that which stands at the head: material forming a head; Head′land, a point of land running out into the sea: a cape.—adj. Head′less, without a head.—ns. Head′-light, a light carried in front of a vessel, locomotive, or vehicle, as a signal, or for light; Head′-line, the line at the head or top of a page containing the folio or number of the page: (pl.) the sails and ropes next the yards (naut.).—adv.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tea dance

Tea dance

A tea dance, or thé dansant is a summer or autumn afternoon or early-evening dance from four to seven, sometimes preceded in the English countryside by a garden party. The function evolved from the concept of the afternoon tea, and J. Pettigrew traces its origin to the French colonization of Morocco. Books on Victorian Era etiquette such as Party-giving on Every Scale, included detailed instructions for hosting such gatherings. By 1880 it was noted "Afternoon dances are seldom given in London, but are a popular form of entertainment in the suburbs, in garrison-towns, watering-places, etc." Tea dances were given by Royal Navy officers aboard ships at various naval stations, the expenses shared by the captain and officers, as they were shared by colonels and officers at barrack dances in mess rooms ashore. The usual refreshments in 1880 were tea and coffee, ices, champagne-cup and claret-cup, fruit, sandwiches, cake and biscuits. Even after the introduction of the phonograph the expected feature was a live orchestra – often referred to as a palm court orchestra – or a small band playing light classical music. The types of dances performed during tea dances included Waltzes, Tangos and, by the late 1920s, The Charleston.

— Freebase

Love

Love

luv, n. fondness: an affection of the mind caused by that which delights: pre-eminent kindness: benevolence: reverential regard: devoted attachment to one of the opposite sex: the object of affection: the god of love, Cupid: (Shak.) a kindness, a favour done: nothing, in billiards, tennis, and some other games.—v.t. to be fond of: to regard with affection: to delight in with exclusive affection: to regard with benevolence.—v.i. to have the feeling of love.—adj. Lov′able, worthy of love: amiable.—ns. Love′-app′le, the fruit of the tomato; Love′bird, a genus of small birds of the parrot tribe, so called from their attachment to each other; Love′-brok′er (Shak.), a third person who carries messages and makes assignations between lovers; Love′-charm, a philtre; Love′-child, a bastard; Love′-day (Shak.), a day for settling disputes; Love′-fā′vour, something given to be worn in token of love; Love′-feast, a religious feast held periodically by certain sects of Christians in imitation of the love-feasts celebrated by the early Christians in connection with the Lord's-supper; Love′-feat, the gallant act of a lover; Love′-in-ī′dleness, the heart's-ease; Love′-juice, a concoction used to excite love; Love′-knot, an intricate knot, used as a token of love.—adj. Love′less, without love, tenderness, or kindness.—ns. Love′-lett′er, a letter of courtship; Love′-lies-bleed′ing, a species of the plant Amaranthus; Love′liness; Love′lock, a lock of hair hanging at the ear, worn by men of fashion in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.—adj. Love′lorn, forsaken by one's love.—n. Love′lornness.adj. Love′ly, exciting love or admiration: amiable: pleasing: delightful.—adv. beautifully, delightfully.—ns. Love′-match, a marriage for love, not money; Love′-mong′ėr, one who deals in affairs of love; Love′-pō′tion, a philtre; Lov′er, one who loves, esp. one in love with person of the opposite sex, in the singular almost exclusively of the man: one who is fond of anything: (B.) a friend.—adjs. Lov′ered (Shak.), having a lover; Lov′erly, like a lover.—n. Love′-shaft, a dart of love from Cupid's bow.—adjs. Love′-sick, languishing with amorous desire; Love′some, lovely.—ns. Love′-suit (Shak.), courtship; Love′-tō′ken, a gift in evidence of love.—adj. Lov′ing, having love or kindness: affectionate: fond: expressing love.—ns.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Goal

Goal

In ice hockey, a goal is scored when the puck completely crosses the goal line between the two goal posts and below the goal crossbar. A goal awards one point to the team attacking the goal scored upon, regardless of which team the player who actually deflected the puck into the goal belongs to. Typically, a player on the team attempting to score shoots the puck with his/her stick towards the goal net opening, and a player on the opposing team called a goaltender tries to block the shot to prevent a goal from being scored against his/her team. The term goal may also refer to the structure in which goals are scored. The ice hockey goal is rectangular in shape; the front frame of the goal is made of steel tube painted red and consists of two vertical goalposts and a horizontal crossbar. A net is attached to the back of the frame to catch pucks that enter the goal and also to prevent pucks from entering it from behind. The entire goal is considered an inbounds area of the playing surface, and it is legal to play the puck behind the goal. Under NHL rules, the opening of the goal is 72 inches wide by 48 inches tall, and the footprint of the goal is 44 inches deep.

— Freebase

Shot on goal

Shot on goal

In ice hockey, a shot on goal is a shot that will enter the goal if it is not stopped by the goaltender. A shot on goal must result in either a goal or a save. Every goal and every save count as shots on goal. This leads to an exception to the definition of a shot on goal. If the ball or puck hits the goal post or crossbar, ricochets off the goaltender, and into the net, it is a goal, and therefore a shot on goal, with the exception of NHL or ice hockey. However, had the goaltender not been present, the shot in question would not have resulted in a goal, and therefore would not be counted as a shot on goal. In the NHL, a shot that is deflected wide or blocked before it reaches the goaltender is not counted as a shot on goal. Shots that sail wide or high of the net and shots that hit the goal post or crossbar are not considered shots on goal, but are scored as shots. If a goaltender blocks a shot that would have missed the net or hit the post, it is not considered a shot on goal. It is the judgment of the statistician which shots are counted as shots on goal. Additionally, attempted shots that go wide are not recorded as an official statistic in the NHL, so shots on goal are often referred to simply as shots in that league

— Freebase

Goal setting

Goal setting

Goal setting involves the development of an action plan designed to motivate and guide a person or group toward a goal. Goal setting can be guided by goal-setting criteria (or rules) such as SMART criteria. Goal setting is a major component of personal-development and management literature. Studies by Edwin A. Locke and his colleagues have shown that more specific and ambitious goals lead to more performance improvement than easy or general goals. The goals should be specific, time constrained and difficult. Difficult goals should be set ideally at the 90th percentile of performance assuming that motivation and not ability is limiting attainment of that level of performance. As long as the person accepts the goal, has the ability to attain it, and does not have conflicting goals, there is a positive linear relationship between goal difficulty and task performance.The theory states that the simplest most direct motivational explanation of why some people perform better than others is because they have different performance goals. The essence of the theory is fourfold. First, difficult specific goals lead to significantly higher performance than easy goals, no goals, or even the setting of an abstract goal such as urging people to do their best. Second, holding ability constant, as this is a theory of motivation, and given that there is goal commitment, the higher the goal the higher the performance. Third, variables such as praise, feedback, or the involvement of people in decision-making only influences behavior to the extent that it leads to the setting of and commitment to a specific difficult goal. Fourth, goal-setting, in addition to affecting the three mechanisms of motivation, namely, choice, effort, and persistence, can also have a cognitive benefit. It can influence choice, effort, and persistence to discover ways to attain the goal.

— Wikipedia

goal umpire

goal umpire

A match official who decides when the ball passes between the goal posts (or behind posts) and the score then to be awarded (goal or behind).

— Wiktionary

Goal

Goal

a base, station, or bound used in various games; in football, a line between two posts across which the ball must pass in order to score; also, the act of kicking the ball over the line between the goal posts

— Webster Dictionary

Goal difference

Goal difference

In sports such as ice hockey and association football, goal difference is often the first tiebreaker used to rank teams which finish a league competition with an equal number of points. In games with more complex scoring, such as rugby union or basketball, the term point difference may be used instead. If a team's points and goal difference are equal, then often goals scored is used as a second tiebreaker, with the team scoring the most goals winning. Alternative tiebreakers that may be used include looking at the head-to-head results between sides, playing a playoff, or the drawing of lots. Goal average is a different scheme that predated goal difference. Using the goal average scheme the number of goals scored is divided by the number of goals conceded. Arsenal won the English football league with a goal average advantage of 0.099 in 1953. Goal difference replaced goal average in the 1970 World Cup finals and from 1976–77 season in the English Football League. Goal average is also used as the tiebreaker in Australian rules football where it is referred to as "percentage". It is calculated as points scored divided by points conceded multiplied by 100.

— Freebase

Golden goal

Golden goal

The golden goal or golden point is a rule used in association football, field hockey, ice hockey and korfball to decide the winner of a match in which scores are equal at the end of normal time. It is a type of sudden death. Under this rule, the team that scores the first goal or point during extra time is the winner. The game ends when a golden goal is scored. Introduced formally in 1992, though with some history before that, the rule ceased to apply to most FIFA authorized football games in 2004. The similar silver goal supplemented the golden goal between 2002 and 2004. The golden goal is still used in the Beach Soccer World Cup, in NCAA matches and in FIH sanctioned field hockey games. A related concept is used in National Rugby League games. A similar golden goal rule is also used in all National Hockey League overtime games, however the term "golden goal" is not used. A rule similar to the golden goal also applies in the National Football League, although again the term itself is not used; additionally, the league began using the rule well before soccer introduced it.

— Freebase

rushed behind

rushed behind

A behind (1 point score) made when the ball passes through the goal posts or behind posts not from the foot of the attacking team; ie. either spilled off hands or deliberately carried through by the defenders.

— Wiktionary

Touchback

Touchback

In American football, a touchback is a ruling which is made and signaled by an official when the ball becomes dead behind or above a goal line and the team who is attacking that goal line is responsible for the ball being there. Responsibility is determined by which team gave the ball the impetus to travel over or across the goal line. Such impetus may be imparted by a kick, pass, fumble, or in certain instances by batting the ball. A touchback is not a play, but a result of events that may occur during a play. A touchback is the opposite of a safety with regard to impetus since a safety is scored when the defending team is responsible for the ball becoming dead behind or above its own goal. Examples of instances where a touchback would be awarded include when: ⁕A kickoff or punt enters the end zone and becomes dead behind the goal line without being advanced beyond the goal line by a player of the receiving team. Thus, a player on the receiving team could attempt to advance the ball out of his own end zone, but the original impetus from the kick remains as long as the ball does not completely cross the goal line into the field of play. Note that if a kick is fielded by the receiving team in its end zone, is advanced beyond the goal line, and then the ball carrier retreats back into his own end zone where the ball is downed, it is a safety because the impetus would then be charged to the receiving team.

— Freebase

Touch

Touch

tuch, v.t. to come in contact with: to perceive by feeling: to reach: to relate to: to handle or treat gently or slightly, as in 'to touch the hat,' &c.: to take, taste: to move or soften: to influence: to move to pity: to taint: (slang) to cheat: to lay the hand upon for the purpose of curing scrofula or king's evil—a practice that ceased only with the accession of the House of Brunswick.—v.i. to be in contact with: to make a passing call: to speak of anything slightly: (prov.) to salute by touching the cap.—n. act of touching: a movement on a musical instrument, skill or nicety in such, a musical note or strain: any impression conveyed by contact, a hint, a slight sound: a stroke with a pen, brush, &c.: a tinge, smack, trace, a slight degree of a thing: sense of feeling, contact, close sympathy, harmony: peculiar or characteristic manner: a style of anything at a certain expenditure: a touchstone, test.—adj. Touch′able, capable of being touched.—n. Touch′ableness, the state or quality of being touchable.—adj. Touch′-and-go, of uncertain issue, ticklish, difficult.—ns. Touch′-back, the act of touching the football to the ground behind the player's own goal when it has been kicked by an opponent; Touch′-box, a box containing tinder, which used to be carried by soldiers armed with matchlocks; Touch′-down, the touching to the ground of a football by a player behind the opponents' goal; Touch′er; Touch′-hole, the small hole of a cannon through which the fire is communicated to the charge.—adv. Touch′ily, in a touchy manner: peevishly.—n. Touch′iness, the quality of being touchy: peevishness: irritability.—adj. Touch′ing, affecting: moving: pathetic.—prep. concerning: with regard to.—adv. Touch′ingly.—ns. Touch′ingness; Touch′-me-not, a plant of genus Impatiens: lupus; Touch′-nee′dle, a small bar or needle of gold for testing articles of the same metal by comparing the streaks they make on a touchstone with those made by the needle; Touch′-pā′per, paper steeped in saltpetre for firing a train of powder, &c.; Touch′piece, a coin or medal formerly given by English sovereigns to those whom they touched for the cure of the king's evil; Touch′stone, a kind of compact basalt or stone for testing gold or silver by the streak of the touch-needle: any test; Touch′wood, some soft combustible material, as amadou, used as tinder.—adj. Touch′y, irritable: peevish.—Touch up, to improve by a series of small touches, to elaborate, embellish.—A near touch, a close shave. [Fr. toucher—from Old High Ger. zucchen (Ger. zucken), to move, to draw.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Zugzwang

Zugzwang

Zugzwang is a situation found usually in chess, but also in various other games, where one player is put at a disadvantage because he has to make a move when he would prefer to pass and make no move. The fact that the player must make a move means that his position will be significantly weaker than the hypothetical one in which it was his opponent's turn to move. The term finds its formal definition in combinatorial game theory, where it specifically means that it directly changes the outcome of the game from a win to a loss. The term is used less precisely in games such as chess, i.e., the game theory definition is not necessarily used in chess,. For instance, it may be defined loosely as "a player to move cannot do anything without making an important concession". Putting the opponent in zugzwang is a common way to help the superior side win a game. In some cases it is necessary to make the win possible. The term zugzwang is frequently used in chess. A player whose turn it is to move who has no move that does not worsen his position is said to be in zugzwang. Thus every move would make his position worse, and he would be better off if he could pass and not move. Sometimes different chess authors use the term zugzwang in different ways. In some literature a reciprocal zugzwang is called zugzwang and a one-sided zugzwang is called a squeeze.

— Freebase

plunged

plunged

to (cause someone or something to) move or fall suddenly and often a long way forward, down, or into something;to become lower in value or level very suddenly and quickly;a sudden movement or fall forward, down, or into something;a sudden and large fall in value or level;to move or fall suddenly forward, down, or into something;If a value or price plunges, it suddenly becomes less;If a person or group plunges into an activity, or a place plunges into a condition, it suddenly experiences it;If you plunge into an activity or are plunged into it, you suddenly get very involved in it.If a person or thing is plunged into a particular state or situation, or if they plunge into it, they are suddenly in that state or situation.If you plunge an object into something, you push it quickly or violently into it.to fall quickly from a high position:To move, or to move something downwards:fall,lower,come down;to make someone or something fall quickly from a high position;to slope downwards suddenly; if an amount or level plunges, it suddenly becomes much lower; to move quickly in an uncontrolled way, or to make someone or something move in this way; to suddenly put someone or something in a much less successful situation, or to be suddenly put in such a situation;to cause to penetrate or enter quickly and forcibly into something; to cause to enter a state or course of action usually suddenly, unexpectedly, or violently ; to thrust or cast oneself into or as if into water;to become pitched or thrown headlong or violently forward and downward,to move oneself in such a manner,to descend or dip suddenly.dive, pitch, sound.

— Editors Contribution

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym of "shopsoiled"?
  • A. hackneyed
  • B. well-worn
  • C. new
  • D. commonplace