Synonyms containing nace, virginia

We've found 2,570 synonyms:

Workers Compensation in Virginia

Workers Compensation in Virginia

Workers’ compensation in Virginia began in 1919 and is a no fault system. Workers’ compensation is considered a compromise between employers and employees. It helps relieve hardship for an injured worker but does not give “full compensation.” Prior to the enactment of the workers’ compensation laws, to receive any type of benefits an employee had to show that the employer was negligent in failing to provide a safe work environment. Needless to say, this usually resulted in lengthy and expensive litigation that caused the employee and his family to suffer. Now, under workers’ compensation, the employee receives benefits (a portion of his lost wages and medical treatment) much faster and for less cost, without ever having to show an employer is negligent. However, as a result of this “compromise,” an employee cannot recover compensation for pain and suffering. The employee gave up the possibility of getting a big financial windfall for immediate medical treatment and a portion of lost wages. On paper, this sounds like a fair compromise. However, what has happened through the years is that the insurance companies and large corporations have lobbied the Virginia State Legislature and have carved away numerous exceptions that usually favor the employer over the employee. Not all accidents that happen at work are covered under workers’ compensation. This means that now, when individuals get hurt at work, they not only have to deal with the financial burden of not working and their health issues, but to get their benefits, they have to fight with the big businesses, big manufacturers, and big insurance companies who spend millions of dollars each year attacking and seeking to change the workers’ compensation laws to benefit hemselves and deprive injured individuals of their benefits. Insurance companies love to and are trained to “delay, delay,deny, delay…” This strategy and the workers’ compensation rules favoring employers hurt injured workers even more. Workers’ compensation is governed by the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission—not insurance companies. The Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission is a state agency. Everything must go through the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission. Filing a claim with the insurance company is not the same as filing a claim with the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission. Check out their website at www.vwc.state.va.us for more information about the commission.

— Editors Contribution

Sally Miles

Sally Miles

Clarence Paul "Sally" Miles (June 21, 1879 – May 2, 1966) was an American football and baseball player, coach, and college administrator. He served as the head football coach at Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College and Polytechnic Institute (VPI)—now known as Virginia Tech—from 1905 to 1906, compiling a record of 14–3–2. Miles also was the head baseball coach at VPI in 1908 and 1913. He served as the school's athletic director from 1920 to 1934. Known as "Mr. VPI," Miles spent nearly 59 years at Virginia Tech in a variety of capacities. His contributions have been recognized by the university by naming a playing field, a football stadium, Miles Stadium, that once stood directly behind the War Memorial Gym (where Payne Hall, Pedrew-Yates Hall, and New Residence Hall East, now stand), a professorship, and a building on the Virginia Tech campus in his honor. Miles died two weeks before the dedication of Clarence P. Miles Hall, a residence hall that houses 217 male students. Miles' nickname "Sally" was a shortened form of "Salskinner," which he brought with him from high school. As an undergraduate, Miles was captain of the baseball team. As a graduate student, he was captain of the football team and was named to the first team of the All-Southern team as a tackle. Miles remained on campus to teach German (personal knowledge), chemistry,and to coach football and baseball. Miles' 1905 team is credited with VPI's first-ever victory over the Virginia. Virginia was so incensed by the loss that it refused to play Tech again until 1923. Miles also served as athletic director, treasurer and dean of the college (then a combined version of a provost and admissions director). He helped organize the Southern Conference, serving as its president. Miles tried but failed to earn membership for Virginia Tech in the Atlantic Coast Conference. Virginia Tech ultimately joined in ACC in 2004. Miles was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame in 1974.

— Wikipedia

University of West Virginia

University of West Virginia

The University of West Virginia was an educational authority formed by the West Virginia Legislature on July 1, 1989, to oversee the operation of the state's graduate and doctoral degree-granting institutions. It was abolished on June 30, 2000. A 17-member Board of Trustees governed the following institutions of higher learning in West Virginia: ⁕West Virginia University, including: ⁕West Virginia University at Parkersburg ⁕West Virginia University School of Medicine ⁕West Virginia University Institute of Technology, and ⁕Potomac State College of West Virginia University ⁕Marshall University, including: ⁕Marshall University Graduate College, and ⁕Marshall University School of Medicine ⁕West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine From the foundation of the state's various colleges until 1970, all colleges, indeed all forms of education, from pre-school through the graduate programs at Marshall University were under a single state Board of Education, with the exception of West Virginia University and what is now known as West Virginia State University which were under separate Boards of Governors as land grant schools. Following the decision in Brown v. Board of Education State was desegregated, gave up its land grant status and was placed under the Board of Education as well.

— Freebase

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, popularly known as Virginia Tech, is a public land-grant and sea-grant university with the main campus in Blacksburg, Virginia, with other research and educational centers throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia, the National Capital Region, and international locations in Switzerland and the Dominican Republic. Founded in 1872 as an agricultural and mechanical land-grant college, Virginia Tech is a research university with the largest full-time student population in Virginia and one of the few public universities in the United States that maintains a corps of cadets. The university is one among a small group of polytechnic universities in the United States which tend to be primarily devoted to the instruction of technical arts and applied sciences. The university fulfills its land-grant mission of transforming knowledge to practice through technological leadership and by fueling economic growth and job creation locally, regionally, and across Virginia. Virginia Tech has the largest number of degree offerings in Virginia, more than 125 campus buildings, a 2,600-acre main campus, off-campus educational facilities in six regions, a study-abroad site in Switzerland, and a 1,700-acre agriculture research farm near the main campus. The main Virginia Tech campus is located in the New River Valley in the valley and ridge physiographic region of the Appalachian Mountains in southwestern Virginia, a few miles from the Jefferson National Forest in Montgomery County.

— Freebase

Seung-Hui Cho

Seung-Hui Cho

Seung-Hui Cho (조승희 in Korean, properly Cho Seung-Hui; January 18, 1984 – April 16, 2007) was a South Korean-born spree killer and mass murderer who killed 32 people and wounded 17 others armed with two semi-automatic pistols (a Glock 19 and a Walther P22) on April 16, 2007, at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia. An additional six people were injured jumping from windows to escape. Cho was a senior-level undergraduate student at the university. The shooting rampage came to be known as the Virginia Tech shooting. Cho committed suicide after police breached the doors of the building where most of the shooting had taken place. His body is buried in Fairfax, Virginia. Born in South Korea, Cho immigrated to the United States at the age of eight with his family. He became a U.S. permanent resident as a South Korean national. In middle school, he was diagnosed with a severe anxiety disorder with selective mutism, as well as major depressive disorder. After his diagnosis, he began receiving treatment and continued to receive therapy and special education support until his junior year of high school. During Cho's last two years at Virginia Tech, several instances of his abnormal behavior, as well as plays and other writings he submitted containing references to violence, caused concern among teachers and classmates. In the aftermath of the shootings, Virginia Governor Tim Kaine convened a panel consisting of various officials and experts to investigate and examine the response and handling of issues related to the shootings. The panel released its final report in August 2007, devoting more than 30 pages to detailing Cho's troubled history. In the report, the panel criticized the failure of the educators and mental health professionals who came into contact with Cho during his college years to notice his deteriorating condition and help him. The panel also criticized misinterpretations of privacy laws and gaps in Virginia's mental health system and gun laws. In addition, the panel faulted Virginia Tech administrators in particular for failing to take immediate action after the first shootings. Nevertheless, the report did acknowledge that Cho must still be held primarily responsible for not seeking assistance.

— Wikipedia

George Mason University

George Mason University

George Mason University (GMU, Mason, or George Mason) is a public research university located on the Fairfax City-Fairfax County border in Virginia. In 1956, the Commonwealth of Virginia authorized the establishment of a Northern Virginia branch of the University of Virginia and the institution that is now named George Mason University opened in September of 1957. It became an independent institution in 1972. It has since grown to become the largest four-year public university in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The university is named after the founding father George Mason, a Virginia planter and politician who authored the Virginia Declaration of Rights that later influenced the future Bill of Right of the United States Constitution. Mason operates four campuses in Virginia (Fairfax, Arlington, Front Royal, and Prince William), as well as a fifth campus in South Korea. The university is classified among "R1: Doctoral Universities – Very high research activity". The university is particularly well known in the fields of economics and law and economics. Two Mason economics professors have won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics: James M. Buchanan in 1986 and Vernon L. Smith in 2002.EagleBank Arena (formerly the Patriot Center), a 10,000-seat arena and concert venue operated by the university, is located on the main Fairfax campus. The university recognizes 500 student groups as well as 41 fraternities and sororities.

— Wikipedia

Jamestown, Virginia

Jamestown, Virginia

The Jamestown settlement in the Colony of Virginia was the first permanent English settlement in the Americas. It was located on the northeast bank of the James (Powhatan) River about 2.5 mi (4 km) southwest of the center of modern Williamsburg. It was established by the Virginia Company of London as "James Fort" on May 4, 1607 O.S.; (May 14, 1607 N.S.), and was considered permanent after a brief abandonment in 1610. It followed several failed attempts, including the Lost Colony of Roanoke, established in 1585 on Roanoke Island. Jamestown served as the colonial capital from 1616 until 1699. The settlement was located within the country of Tsenacommacah, which belonged to the Powhatan Confederacy, and specifically in that of the Paspahegh tribe. The natives initially welcomed and provided crucial provisions and support for the colonists, who were not agriculturally inclined. Relations quickly soured, and the colonists would annihilate the Paspahegh in warfare within four years. Despite the dispatch of more settlers and supplies, including the 1608 arrival of eight Polish and German colonists and the first two European women, more than 80 percent of the colonists died in 1609–10, mostly from starvation and disease. In mid-1610, the survivors abandoned Jamestown, though they returned after meeting a resupply convoy in the James River. In August 1619, the first recorded slaves from Africa to British North America arrived in what is now Old Point Comfort near the Jamestown colony, on a British privateer ship flying a Dutch flag. The approximately 20 Africans from the present-day Angola had been removed by the British crew from a Portuguese slave ship, the "São João Bautista". They most likely worked in the tobacco fields as slaves under a system of race-based indentured servitude. The modern conception of slavery in the colonial United States was formalized in 1640 (the John Punch hearing) and was fully entrenched in Virginia by 1660.The London Company's second settlement in Bermuda claims to be the site of the oldest town in the English New World, as St. George's, Bermuda was officially established in 1612 as New London, whereas James Fort in Virginia was not converted into James Towne until 1619, and further did not survive to the present day.In 1676, Jamestown was deliberately burned during Bacon's Rebellion, though it was quickly rebuilt. In 1699, the colonial capital was moved to what is today Williamsburg, Virginia; Jamestown ceased to exist as a settlement, and remains today only as an archaeological site. Today, Jamestown is one of three locations composing the Historic Triangle of Colonial Virginia, along with Williamsburg and Yorktown, with two primary heritage sites. Historic Jamestowne is the archaeological site on Jamestown Island and is a cooperative effort by Jamestown National Historic Site (part of Colonial National Historical Park) and Preservation Virginia. Jamestown Settlement, a living history interpretive site, is operated by the Jamestown Yorktown Foundation, a state agency of the Commonwealth of Virginia.

— Wikipedia

Woodbine

Woodbine

the Virginia creeper. See Virginia creeper, under Virginia

— Webster Dictionary

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia is a U.S. state located in the Appalachian region of the Southern United States. It is bordered by Virginia to the southeast, Kentucky to the southwest, Ohio to the northwest, Pennsylvania to the north, and Maryland to the northeast. West Virginia is the 41st largest by area and the 38th most populous of the 50 United States. The capital and largest city is Charleston. West Virginia became a state following the Wheeling Conventions and broke away from Virginia during the American Civil War. The new state was admitted to the Union on June 20, 1863, and was a key Civil War border state. West Virginia was the only state to form by seceding from a Confederate state and was one of two states formed during the American Civil War. The Census Bureau and the Association of American Geographers classify West Virginia as part of the South. The northern panhandle extends adjacent to Pennsylvania and Ohio, with the West Virginia cities of Wheeling and Weirton just across the border from the Pittsburgh metropolitan area, while Bluefield is less than 70 miles from North Carolina. Huntington in the southwest is close to the states of Ohio and Kentucky, while Martinsburg and Harpers Ferry in the Eastern Panhandle region are considered to be a part of the Washington metropolitan area, in between the states of Maryland and Virginia. The unique position of West Virginia means that it is often included in several geographical regions, including the Mid-Atlantic, the Upland South, and the Southeastern United States. It is the only state that is entirely within the area served by the Appalachian Regional Commission; the area is commonly defined as "Appalachia."

— Freebase

Wheeling

Wheeling

Wheeling is a city in the U.S. state of West Virginia located in Ohio and Marshall counties. It is the county seat of Ohio County. Wheeling is the principal city of the Wheeling Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2000 census, the Wheeling, WV MSA had a population of 153,172. Wheeling was originally a settlement in the British Colony of Virginia and later an important city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. It was part of the land which the United States allowed to be annexed to Virginia when the Northwest Territory was being organized in 1787. In 1853 the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad reached Wheeling, connecting it to markets back to the port city of Baltimore, Maryland and stimulating development. In 1861, with differences over slavery and loyalty to the Union upon the outbreak of the American Civil War, the western counties of Virginia seceded from the state. Wheeling was the location of the Wheeling Convention, which established the state of West Virginia, and was the first capital of West Virginia. The capital moved so often in its early years that it was nicknamed the "floating capital". In 1870, the State Legislature designated Charleston as the capital city. In 1875, the Legislature reversed their decision and voted to return the capital to Wheeling. This was appealed by the citizens of Charleston and finally settled by the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals in favor of Wheeling. In 1877 the Legislature ordered an election to be held for the citizens of West Virginia to select a permanent location for the capital, choosing between Charleston, Martinsburg and Clarksburg. By proclamation of the governor, the official move took place eight years later, and in 1885 the capital moved from Wheeling to Charleston, where it has remained.

— Freebase

Virginia

Virginia

Virginia, officially the Commonwealth of Virginia, is a U.S. state located in the South Atlantic region of the United States. Virginia is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" and the "Mother of Presidents" after the eight U.S. presidents born there. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; and Virginia Beach is the most populous city. Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision. The wealthiest is Loudoun County. The Commonwealth's population is over eight million. The area's history begins with several indigenous groups, including the Powhatan. In 1607 the London Company established the Colony of Virginia as the first permanent New World English colony. Slave labor and the land acquired from displaced Native American tribes each played a significant role in the colony's early politics and plantation economy. Virginia was one of the 13 Colonies in the American Revolution and joined the Confederacy in the American Civil War, during which Richmond was made the Confederate capital and Virginia's northwestern counties seceded to form the state of West Virginia. Although the Commonwealth was under conservative single-party rule for nearly a century following Reconstruction, both major national parties are competitive in modern Virginia.

— Freebase

Virginia

Virginia

vėr-jin′i-a, n. a well-known brand of tobacco, grown and manufactured in Virginia.—n. Virgin′ia-creep′er, an American climbing vine, common in the south of England, remarkable for the bright-red colour it assumes in autumn.—adj. Virgin′ian, pertaining to Virginia.—n. a native of Virginia.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Joe Manchin

Joe Manchin

Joseph Manchin III (born August 24, 1947) is an American politician serving as the senior United States Senator from West Virginia, a seat he has held since 2010. A member of the Democratic Party, he previously served as the 34th governor of West Virginia from 2005 to 2010 and the 27th secretary of state of West Virginia from 2001 to 2005. He is a potential candidate for governor in 2020.Manchin is a moderate Democrat, a fact which has allowed him to win elections in West Virginia even as the state shifted from one of the most Democratic in the country to one of the most Republican. He won the 2004 gubernatorial election by a large margin and was re-elected with an even larger margin in 2008; in both years, Republican presidential candidates captured the majority of West Virginia's votes. Manchin won the special election in 2010 to fill the Senate seat vacated by Robert Byrd when he died in office. Manchin was elected to a full term in 2012 with 60 percent of the vote, and was later reelected in 2018 by a much narrower margin. Manchin became the state's senior U.S. Senator when Jay Rockefeller retired in 2015. As a member of Congress, Manchin is known for his bipartisanship, voting or working with Republicans on issues such as abortion and gun ownership. He opposed the energy policies of President Barack Obama, voted against cloture for the Don't Ask, Don't Tell Repeal Act of 2010 (he did not vote on the bill itself), voted for removing federal funding from Planned Parenthood in 2015, and voted to confirm most of Republican President Donald Trump's cabinet and judicial appointees. However, Manchin has repeatedly voted against attempts to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (also known as Obamacare), voted to preserve funding for Planned Parenthood in 2017, and voted against the 2017 Republican tax plan. Manchin has complained about the "toxic" lack of bipartisanship in Congress on almost every issue; "liberal activists argue he is too conservative for the Democratic Party, while Republicans argue he is too liberal for West Virginia."

— Wikipedia

Virginia Beach, Virginia

Virginia Beach, Virginia

Virginia Beach is an independent city located on the southeastern coast of the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 437,994; in 2019, it was estimated to be 449,974. Although mostly suburban in character, it is the most populous city in Virginia and the 44th most populous city in the nation. Located on the Atlantic Ocean at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, Virginia Beach is included in the Hampton Roads metropolitan area. This area, known as "America's First Region", also includes the independent cities of Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Suffolk, as well as other smaller cities, counties, and towns of Hampton Roads. Virginia Beach is a resort city with miles of beaches and hundreds of hotels, motels, and restaurants along its oceanfront. Every year the city hosts the East Coast Surfing Championships as well as the North American Sand Soccer Championship, a beach soccer tournament. It is also home to several state parks, several long-protected beach areas, three military bases, a number of large corporations, Virginia Wesleyan University and Regent University, the international headquarters and site of the television broadcast studios for Pat Robertson's Christian Broadcasting Network (CBN), Edgar Cayce's Association for Research and Enlightenment, and numerous historic sites. Near the point where the Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Ocean meet, Cape Henry was the site of the first landing of the English colonists, who eventually settled in Jamestown, on April 26, 1607. The city is listed in the Guinness Book of Records as having the longest pleasure beach in the world. It is located at the southern end of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel, used to be known as the world's longest bridge-tunnel complex until 2018, when Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge opened to traffic in the Cantonese Greater Bay Area.

— Wikipedia

Richmond, Virginia

Richmond, Virginia

Richmond () is the capital city of the Commonwealth of Virginia. It is the center of the Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) and the Greater Richmond Region. Richmond was incorporated in 1742 and has been an independent city since 1871. As of the 2010 census, the city's population was 204,214; in 2019, the population was estimated to be 230,436, making Richmond the fourth-most populous city in Virginia. The Richmond Metropolitan Area has a population of 1,260,029, the third-most populous metro in the state. Richmond is at the fall line of the James River, 44 miles (71 km) west of Williamsburg, 66 miles (106 km) east of Charlottesville, 91 miles (146 km) east of Lynchburg and 92 miles (148 km) south of Washington, D.C. Surrounded by Henrico and Chesterfield counties, the city is at the intersections of Interstate 95 and Interstate 64 and encircled by Interstate 295, Virginia State Route 150 and Virginia State Route 288. Major suburbs include Midlothian to the southwest, Chesterfield to the south, Varina to the southeast, Sandston to the east, Glen Allen to the north and west, Short Pump to the west and Mechanicsville to the northeast.The site of Richmond had been an important village of the Powhatan Confederacy, and was briefly settled by English colonists from Jamestown from 1609 to 1611. The present city of Richmond was founded in 1737. It became the capital of the Colony and Dominion of Virginia in 1780, replacing Williamsburg. During the Revolutionary War period, several notable events occurred in the city, including Patrick Henry's "Give me liberty or give me death" speech in 1775 at St. John's Church, and the passage of the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom written by Thomas Jefferson. During the American Civil War, Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy. It entered the 20th century with one of the world's first successful electric streetcar systems. The Jackson Ward neighborhood is a traditional hub of African-American commerce and culture. Richmond's economy is primarily driven by law, finance, and government, with federal, state, and local governmental agencies, as well as notable legal and banking firms in the downtown area. The city is home to both a U.S. Court of Appeals, one of 13 such courts, and a Federal Reserve Bank, one of 12 such banks. Dominion Energy and WestRock, Fortune 500 companies, are headquartered in the city, with others in the metropolitan area.

— Wikipedia

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. merge
  • B. defuse
  • C. aggregate
  • D. combine