Synonyms containing novelty item

We've found 1,661 synonyms:

English auction

English auction

An English auction is an open-outcry ascending dynamic auction. It proceeds as follows. The auctioneer opens the auction by announcing a suggested opening bid, a starting price or reserve for the item on sale. Then, the auctioneer accepts increasingly higher bids from the floor, consisting of buyers with an interest in the item. The auctioneer usually determines the minimum increment of bids, often raising it when bidding goes high. The highest bidder at any given moment is considered to have the standing bid, which can only be displaced by a higher bid from a competing buyer. If no competing bidder challenges the standing bid within a given time frame, the standing bid becomes the winner, and the item is sold to the highest bidder at a price equal to their bid. If no bidder accepts the starting price, the auctioneer either begins to lower the starting price in increments, bidders are allowed to bid prices lower than the starting price, or the item is not sold at all, according to the wishes of the seller or protocols of the auction houseUnlike sealed-bid auctions (such as first-price sealed-bid auction or Vickrey auction), an English auction is "open" or fully transparent, as the identity of all bidders is disclosed to each other during the auction. More generally, an auction mechanism is considered "English" if it involves an iterative process of adjusting the price in a direction that is unfavorable to the bidders (increasing in price if the item is being sold to competing buyers or decreasing in price in a reverse auction with competing sellers). In contrast, a Dutch auction would adjust the price in a direction that favored the bidders (lowering the price if the item is being sold to competing buyers, increasing it, if it is a reverse auction). When the auction involves a single item for sale and each participant has as an independent private value for the item auctioned, the expected payment and expected revenues of an English auction is theoretically equivalent to that of the Vickrey auction, and both mechanisms have weakly dominant strategies. Both the Vickrey and English auction, although very different procedurally, award the item to the bidder with the highest value at a price equal to the value of the second highest bidder.

— Wikipedia

Novelty song

Novelty song

A novelty song is a comical or nonsensical song, performed principally for its comical effect. Humorous songs, or those containing humorous elements, are not necessarily novelty songs. The term arose in Tin Pan Alley to describe one of the major divisions of popular music. The other two divisions were ballads and dance music. Novelty songs achieved great popularity during the 1920s and 1930s. Novelty songs are often a parody or humor song, and may apply to a current event such as a holiday or a fad such as a dance. Many use unusual lyrics, subjects, sounds, or instrumentation, and may not even be musical. "They're Coming to Take Me Away, Ha-Haaa!" has little music and is set to a rhythm tapped out on a snare drum and tambourine. One novelty song, a remix of "Axel F" by Crazy Frog, started as a mobile phone ringtone.

— Freebase

Layaway

Layaway

Layaway is an agreement in which the seller reserves an item for a consumer until the consumer completes all the payments necessary to pay for that item. Rather than taking the item home and then repaying the debt on a regular schedule, as in most installment plans or hire purchases, the layaway customer does not receive the item until it is completely paid for. There is sometimes a fee associated, since the seller must "lay" the item "away" in storage until the payments are completed. Because there is little risk involved for the seller, layaway can be readily offered to those with bad credit. If the transaction is not completed, the item is returned to stock and the customer's money is returned minus a fee. The main advantage of layaway is that no interest is charged. In addition, the price is fixed, availability is guaranteed by reserving the item in stock, and an item being purchased as a gift can be kept secret. Consumers may also gain a sense of living within their means. Layaway became common during the Great Depression of the 1930s. It was widely withdrawn during the 1980s, as the ubiquity of credit cards decreased its utility. Layaway also got tagged as "ghetto financing". Wal-Mart announced in September 2006 that it would discontinue layaway service in all its stores, citing the decrease in demand and a rise in cost of implementation. However, in September 2011, Wal-Mart resumed the service due to the new financial difficulties imposed by the economy and the increased constraints on consumer credit. For the 2012 season, many retailers are heavily advertising their layaway service and offering it for free if all conditions are met. In contrast, Kmart has provided layaway in the United States for forty years, and was at one time the only major national discount retailer offering the service. Other large retailers offering layaway programs include Toys "R" Us, Burlington Coat Factory, Marshalls and T.J. Maxx. In Canada it is available from many businesses including bicycle shops, jewellers and adventure holidays.

— Freebase

timewave

timewave

In novelty theory, a graph of novelty plotted against time.

— Wiktionary

HAKMEM

HAKMEM

MIT AI Memo 239 (February 1972). A legendary collection of neat mathematical and programming hacks contributed by many people at MIT and elsewhere. (The title of the memo really is “HAKMEM”, which is a 6-letterism for ‘hacks memo’.) Some of them are very useful techniques, powerful theorems, or interesting unsolved problems, but most fall into the category of mathematical and computer trivia. Here is a sampling of the entries (with authors), slightly paraphrased:Item 41 (Gene Salamin): There are exactly 23,000 prime numbers less than 218.Item 46 (Rich Schroeppel): The most probable suit distribution in bridge hands is 4-4-3-2, as compared to 4-3-3-3, which is the most evenly distributed. This is because the world likes to have unequal numbers: a thermodynamic effect saying things will not be in the state of lowest energy, but in the state of lowest disordered energy.Item 81 (Rich Schroeppel): Count the magic squares of order 5 (that is, all the 5-by-5 arrangements of the numbers from 1 to 25 such that all rows, columns, and diagonals add up to the same number). There are about 320 million, not counting those that differ only by rotation and reflection.Item 154 (Bill Gosper): The myth that any given programming language is machine independent is easily exploded by computing the sum of powers of 2. If the result loops with period = 1 with sign +, you are on a sign-magnitude machine. If the result loops with period = 1 at -1, you are on a twos-complement machine. If the result loops with period greater than 1, including the beginning, you are on a ones-complement machine. If the result loops with period greater than 1, not including the beginning, your machine isn't binary — the pattern should tell you the base. If you run out of memory, you are on a string or bignum system. If arithmetic overflow is a fatal error, some fascist pig with a read-only mind is trying to enforce machine independence. But the very ability to trap overflow is machine dependent. By this strategy, consider the universe, or, more precisely, algebra: Let X = the sum of many powers of 2 = ...111111 (base 2). Now add X to itself: X + X = ...111110. Thus, 2X = X - 1, so X = -1. Therefore algebra is run on a machine (the universe) that is two's-complement.Item 174 (Bill Gosper and Stuart Nelson): 21963283741 is the only number such that if you represent it on the PDP-10 as both an integer and a floating-point number, the bit patterns of the two representations are identical.Item 176 (Gosper): The “banana phenomenon” was encountered when processing a character string by taking the last 3 letters typed out, searching for a random occurrence of that sequence in the text, taking the letter following that occurrence, typing it out, and iterating. This ensures that every 4-letter string output occurs in the original. The program typed BANANANANANANANA.... We note an ambiguity in the phrase, “the Nth occurrence of.” In one sense, there are five 00's in 0000000000; in another, there are nine. The editing program TECO finds five. Thus it finds only the first ANA in BANANA, and is thus obligated to type N next. By Murphy's Law, there is but one NAN, thus forcing A, and thus a loop. An option to find overlapped instances would be useful,

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Novelty item

Novelty item

A novelty item is a small manufactured adornment, especially a personal adornment. This term covers a range of small manufactured goods, such as collectables, gadgets and executive toys. Novelty items are generally devices that do not primarily have a practical function. Toys for adults are often classed as novelties.

— Freebase

Glycemic Index

Glycemic Index

A numerical system of measuring the rate of BLOOD GLUCOSE generation by a particular food item as compared to a reference item, such as glucose = 100. Foods with higher glycemic index numbers create greater blood sugar swings. These numbers do not correspond to calories or amounts of food intake but rather, depend on the rates of digestion and absorption of these food items.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

chattel mortgage

chattel mortgage

a loan to buy some personal item; the item (or chattel) is security for the loan

— Princeton's WordNet

pooling of interest

pooling of interest

an accounting method used in the merging of companies; the balance sheets are added together item by item; this method is tax-free

— Princeton's WordNet

push-down list

push-down list, push-down stack, stack

a list in which the next item to be removed is the item most recently stored (LIFO)

— Princeton's WordNet

push-down queue

push-down queue

a queue in which the last item to go in is the first item to come out (LIFO)

— Princeton's WordNet

push-down stack

push-down list, push-down stack, stack

a list in which the next item to be removed is the item most recently stored (LIFO)

— Princeton's WordNet

push-down storage

push-down storage, push-down store, stack

a storage device that handles data so that the next item to be retrieved is the item most recently stored (LIFO)

— Princeton's WordNet

push-down store

push-down storage, push-down store, stack

a storage device that handles data so that the next item to be retrieved is the item most recently stored (LIFO)

— Princeton's WordNet

stack

push-down list, push-down stack, stack

a list in which the next item to be removed is the item most recently stored (LIFO)

— Princeton's WordNet

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An antonym for "curdled"
  • A. solidified
  • B. grumous
  • C. thin
  • D. coagulated