Synonyms containing ober-ammergau

We've found 11 synonyms:

Procurator

Procurator

Procurator, was an office initially created by Peter the Great, the first Emperor of the Russian Empire, in an effort to bring the Russian Orthodox Church more directly under his control. The Russian word prokuror also has the meaning of prosecutor. Chief Procurator was the official title of the head of the Holy Synod, effectively the lay head of the Russian Orthodox Church, and a member of the Tsar's cabinet. Konstantin Pobedonostsev, a former tutor of both Alexander III and Nicholas II, was one of the most powerful men to hold this post. General Procurator and Ober-Procurator were major supervisory positions in the Russian Governing Senate, with their meaning changing over time. Eventually "Ober-Procurator" became the title of the Chief of a department of the Senate.

— Freebase

Oberhaus

Oberhaus

ō′ber-hows, n. the upper house in those German legislative bodies that have two chambers. [Ger. ober, upper, haus, house.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Face card

Face card

In a deck of playing cards, the term face card is generally used to describe a card that depicts a person. Modern decks include three face cards per suits, or twelve face cards in a suit of four decks. ⁕A deck of French playing cards has the following face cards: Jack, Queen. King ⁕Italian playing cards replace the Queen by the Knight: Fante, Knight, Re ⁕German and Swiss playing cards similarly have three male face cards per deck, Under/Unter, Ober, König While modern decks of playing cards may contain a Joker depicting a person, jokers are not normally considered to be face cards.

— Freebase

Head and Shoulders

Head and Shoulders

"Head and Shoulders" is a short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald written and published in 1920. It was first published in The Saturday Evening Post, with the help of Fitzgerald's agent, Harold Ober. It later appeared in his short story collection Flappers and Philosophers. It tells the story of a young prodigy at Yale who falls for a spirited dancer in spite of himself.

— Freebase

Oberek

Oberek

The oberek, also called obertas or ober, is a lively Polish dance. The name "Oberek" is derived from "obracać się" which in Polish means "to spin". This dance consists of many lifts and jumps. It is performed at a much quicker pace than the Polish waltz and is one of the national dances of Poland. This is the second-most popular dance in Polish-American music, after the polka.

— Freebase

Oberman

Oberman

Oberman: Ober-man: O-bear-man: It's a fish m8.

— Editors Contribution

Geheimrat

Geheimrat

Geheimrat was the title of the highest advising officials at the Imperial, royal or princely courts of the Holy Roman Empire, who jointly formed the Geheimer Rat reporting to the ruler. The term remained in use during subsequent monarchic reigns in German-speaking areas of Europe until the end of the First World War. At its origin the literal meaning of the word in German was 'trusted advisor'. The English-language equivalent is Privy Councillor. The office contributing to the state's politics and legislation had its roots in the age of absolutism from the 17th century onward, when a governmental administration by a dependent bureaucracy was established similar to the French Conseil du Roi. A precursor was the Reichshofrat, a judicial body established by Emperor Maximilian I of Habsburg. In Austria the professional title of Hofrat (Court Councillor) has remained in use as an official title for deserved civil servants up to today. With the Empire's dissolution and the rise of Constitutionalism in the aftermath of the French Revolution, the office of a Geheimrat became an honorific title conferred by the German states upon high officials, accompanied by the address Exzellenz. During that period related titles no longer affiliated with an office arose, like (in German) Geheimer Kommerzienrat, an award for outstanding contributions in the field of commerce and industry, or (in German) Geheimer Medizinalrat, an award for outstanding contributions to medicine. The term is also used in combination with the word ecke — Geheimratsecke, colloquially describing male pattern baldness at the 'edges' of the forehead (i.e. the upper 'corners' of the face). In the Republic of Austria the title was officially abolished in 1919. In Germany, the title largely disappeared after the fall of the German Empire in 1918, when the various princely states of Germany were replaced by the constituent states of the Weimar Republic, although Geheimräte continued to be appointed by the Free State of Bavaria. However, many honorees continued to use it, and the title Geheimrat, its abbreviation Geh. Rat and related abbreviations (Geh. Med.-Rat, Geh. Ober-Med.-Rat and even Geh. Hofrat) appear in captions until the 1930s, such as used by the German Federal Archives.

— Wikipedia

Generaloberst

Generaloberst

Generaloberst, in English colonel general, was, in Germany and Austria-Hungary—the German Reichswehr and Wehrmacht, the Austro-Hungarian Common Army, and the East German National People's Army, as well as the respective police services—the second highest general officer rank, ranking as equal to a 4 star full general but below general field marshal. It was equivalent to Generaladmiral in the Kriegsmarine until 1945, or to Flottenadmiral in the Volksmarine until 1990. The rank was the highest ordinary military rank and the highest military rank awarded in peacetime; the higher rank of general field marshal was only awarded in wartime by the head of state. In general, a Generaloberst had the same privileges as a general field marshal. A literal translation of Generaloberst would be "uppermost general", but it is often translated as "colonel-general" by analogy to Oberst, "colonel", including in countries where the rank was adopted, e.g. in Russia (генерал-полковник, general-polkovnik). "Oberst" derives from the superlative form of Germanic ober (upper), cognate to English over, thus "Superior General" might be a more idiomatic rendering. The rank was created in 1854, originally for Emperor William I—then Prince of Prussia—because traditionally members of the royal family were not promoted to the rank of field marshal. During the 19th century the rank was largely honorary and usually only held by members of the princely families or the Governor of Berlin. Regular promotion of professional officers to the grade did not begin until 1911. Since the rank of Generalfeldmarschall was also reserved for wartime promotions, the additional rank of a "supreme general in the capacity of a field marshal"—the Generaloberst im Range eines Generalfeldmarschalls—was created for promotions during peacetime. Such generals were entitled to wear four pips on their shoulder boards, compared to the normal three. As such, Generaloberst could be a peacetime equivalent of the general field marshal rank. Generaloberst was the second highest general officer rank—below field marshal—in the Prussian Army as well as in the German Empire (1871–1918), the Weimar Republic (1921–33), the Wehrmacht (which included the Luftwaffe, established in 1935) of Nazi Germany (1933–45), and the East German Nationale Volksarmee (1949–1991). As military ranks were often used for other uniformed services, the rank was also used by the Waffen-SS and the Ordnungspolizei of Nazi Germany, and the Volkspolizei and Stasi of East Germany. In East Germany, the rank was junior to the general of the army (Armeegeneral), as well as to the briefly extant, and never awarded, rank of Marschall der DDR.

— Wikipedia

Abplanalp

Abplanalp

Abplanalp is a Swiss surname. Originally a locational surname, it is derived from Planalp, the name of an alpine pasture (alp) and dispersed settlement above Brienz, Bernese Oberland, on the southern flank of Brienzer Rothorn, at an altitude between about 1300 and 1900 masl, now also the name of a stop of the Brienz Rothorn Railway (1341 m). The settlement is a Walser foundation, first recorded in 1306. At least seasonal use of the area is assumed for the late Roman period, as numerous local toponyms have Latin etymologies. The lower part of the settlement was formerly permanently inhabited, known by the name of Husstatt. It is now a seasonal pasture, divided into five lots or Stafel: Usweid (1350 m), Greesgi (1560 m), Rinderbiel (1760 m), Gummi (1820 m), and Obristen (also Ober Stafel, 1830 m). Substantial avalanche defenses were built after the winter 1942/3. There is a legend according to which Planalp was completely destroyed by avalanches, the only survivor being an infant found floating in its cradle in Lake Brienz. Since the identity of the infant was unknown, it was given the surname of Abplanalp "from Planalp". As a Swiss-American surname, Abplanalp has also been simplified to Aplanalp or Planalp. People with the surname: Fritz Abplanalp (1907–1982), Swiss woodcarver Robert Abplanalp (1922–2003), American inventor of the aerosol spray valve

— Wikipedia

Zinal

Zinal

Zinal is a village in Switzerland, located in the municipality of Anniviers in the canton of Valais. It lies at an elevation of 1,675 metres (5,495 ft) above sea level in the Swiss Alps in the Val de Zinal, a valley running from the Zinal Glacier, north of Dent Blanche to the village of Ayer, part of the Val d'Anniviers. With the Dent Blanche, four additional 4,000-metre (13,120 ft) peaks are located around the valley: Bishorn, Weisshorn, Zinalrothorn, and Ober Gabelhorn.

— Wikipedia

eBillme

eBillme

eBillmeâ„¢ is the most secure way to pay online and the only online payment solution that extends the convenience of online banking to the merchant™s checkout process. The service enhances security for online shoppers, and enables merchants to increase sales while reducing transaction costs. Consumers can shop online and pay for their purchases at their bank, credit union, or bill pay portal using the security and convenience of online banking or by paying the bill at over 75,000 walk-in locations. eBillme is available at ober 800+ online retailers including Sears, Kmart, TigerDirect, ShoeBuy, and more.For more information, please visit www.eBillme.com.

— CrunchBase

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An antonym for "curdled"
  • A. thin
  • B. coagulated
  • C. solidified
  • D. grumous