Synonyms containing office automation

We've found 6,572 synonyms:

Home automation

Home automation

Home automation is the residential extension of building automation. It is automation of the home, housework or household activity. Home automation may include centralized control of lighting, HVAC, appliances, security locks of gates and doors and other systems, to provide improved convenience, comfort, energy efficiency and security. Home automation for the elderly and disabled can provide increased quality of life for persons who might otherwise require caregivers or institutional care. The popularity of home automation has been increasing greatly in recent years due to much higher affordability and simplicity through smartphone and tablet connectivity. The concept of the "Internet of Things" has tied in closely with the popularization of home automation. A home automation system integrates electrical devices in a house with each other. The techniques employed in home automation include those in building automation as well as the control of domestic activities, such as home entertainment systems, houseplant and yard watering, pet feeding, changing the ambiance "scenes" for different events, and the use of domestic robots. Devices may be connected through a computer network to allow control by a personal computer, and may allow remote access from the internet. Through the integration of information technologies with the home environment, systems and appliances are able to communicate in an integrated manner which results in convenience, energy efficiency, and safety benefits.

— Freebase

Office automation

Office automation

Office automation refers to the varied computer machinery and software used to digitally create, collect, store, manipulate, and relay office information needed for accomplishing basic tasks. Raw data storage, electronic transfer, and the management of electronic business information comprise the basic activities of an office automation system. Office automation helps in optimizing or automating existing office procedures. The backbone of office automation is a LAN, which allows users to transmit data, mail and even voice across the network. All office functions, including dictation, typing, filing, copying, fax, Telex, microfilm and records management, telephone and telephone switchboard operations, fall into this category. As office methods evolved to take full advantage of new technologies, there was a corresponding increase in innovations tailor-made to optimize office processes. Office automation was a popular term in the 1970s and 1980s as the desktop computer exploded onto the scene. Advantages are: ⁕Office automation can get many tasks accomplished faster. ⁕It eliminates the need for a large staff. ⁕Less storage is required to store data. ⁕Multiple people can update data simultaneously in the event of changes in schedule

— Freebase

Midac

Midac

MIDAC is an acronym created in 1981 by a Sydney-based business, Combined Resources Computing (CRC). It stands for Microprocessor Intelligent Data Acquisition and Control. CRC was established in order to complete several building automation projects commenced by R-Tec. R-Tec was an Australian development company based in Sydney that focussed on designing innovative computerised building automation products. The proprietors formed R-Tec in the late 1970s after leaving Johnson Controls. The early R-Tec automation systems used TTL logic with control parameters stored in dynamic memory. The early computerised building automation systems or BAS monitored alarms and conditions relating to building services including air conditioning, water and power, etc. They also controlled plant by starting and stopping pumps and fans according to time and other interlock conditions. The systems of the 1970s and early 1980s used parallel or multiple conductor communications data busses to communication with Data Gathering Panels (DGPs) located throughout the building. The DGPs would communicate monitored conditions using multiplex techniques back to a central location and "front end" system through the parallel data trunk. In the same way commands to start and stop plant would be sent from the front end to the DGP and then to the machine. All decisions or "intelligence" was centrally located, and the DGPs simply relayed information. Combined Resources Computing was established by Kevin Johnson-Bade, an ex R-Tec software engineer, with the prime goal of completing the building automation system contracted to R-Tec by the University of Melbourne. This occurred when R-Tec closed down, being unable to complete its contractual commitments. The University of Melbourne building automation system was ambitious. In 1982 it was possibly the first successful implementation of a distributed intelligence building automation or Direct Digital Control or DDC system using Z80 microprocessors. Remote units called Satellite Intelligence Units (SIUs) were located in buildings around the campus and were connected to the front end using a serial communications. See: Distributed control system CRC developed a unique object-oriented control algorithm building approach. Even though the Z80 microprocessor of the time ran at only 1 MHz, and had a memory addressing range of 64 Kbytes, the University of Melbourne system out-performed other automations systems of the time significantly. CRC created a front-end computer that used ten processors to share the task, having access to up to 256 pages of shared memory. Each SIU used two Z80 processors. This allowed the intelligence to be shared, and many decisions to be made locally thus further reducing the load on the front end and reducing communications. The University of Melbourne system was a leader in the development of distributed intelligence DDC system. Out of CRC Midac System Pty Limited was formed in 1982, and went on to develop and implement more leading DDC technology included systems where the front-end computer was a CPM operating system MZ3500 Sharp personal computer. The Sharp was chosen because of its much superior graphics compared with the early IBM PC of the early 1980s. Over the following years the major players like Johnson and Honeywell would follow, replacing their mini-computer front-end terminals with PCs as they implemented microprocessor-based distributed intelligence systems using serial communications networks. Toward the end of the 1980s and early 1990s most DDC systems included an object-oriented control algorithm building tool. They compiled the object-oriented instructions into the system's native proprietary linear language, whereas in the Midac approach the control system's native language or operating environment was itself object-oriented. Midac went on to develop three new generations of microprocessor-based DDC systems, the last version being Nexus, developed for DKS that was taken over by James Hardie's Building Automation division. That business and its assets including Nexus were purchased by Chubb International in the late 1990s.

— Wikipedia

Automation

Automation

Automation is the use of machines, control systems and information technologies to optimize productivity in the production of goods and delivery of services. The correct incentive for applying automation is to increase productivity, and/or quality beyond that possible with current human labor levels so as to realize economies of scale, and/or realize predictable quality levels. In the scope of industrialisation, automation is a step beyond mechanization. Whereas mechanization provides human operators with machinery to assist them with the muscular requirements of work, automation greatly decreases the need for human sensory and mental requirements while increasing load capacity, speed, and repeatability. Automation plays an increasingly important role in the world economy and in daily experience. Automation has had a notable impact in a wide range of industries beyond manufacturing. Once-ubiquitous telephone operators have been replaced largely by automated telephone switchboards and answering machines. Medical processes such as primary screening in electrocardiography or radiography and laboratory analysis of human genes, sera, cells, and tissues are carried out at much greater speed and accuracy by automated systems. Automated teller machines have reduced the need for bank visits to obtain cash and carry out transactions. In general, automation has been responsible for the shift in the world economy from industrial jobs to service jobs in the 20th and 21st centuries.

— Freebase

Microsoft Office 2007

Microsoft Office 2007

Microsoft Office 2007 (codenamed Office 12) is a version of Microsoft Office, a family of office suites and productivity software for Windows, developed and published by Microsoft. It was released to manufacturing on November 3, 2006; it was subsequently made available to volume license customers on November 30, 2006, and later to retail on January 30, 2007, the same respective release dates of Windows Vista. It was preceded by Office 2003 and succeeded by Office 2010. Office 2007 introduced a new graphical user interface called the Fluent User Interface, which uses ribbons and an Office menu instead of menu bars and toolbars. Office 2007 also introduced Office Open XML file formats as the default file formats in Excel, PowerPoint, and Word. The new formats are intended to facilitate the sharing of information between programs, improve security, reduce the size of documents, and enable new recovery scenarios.Office 2007 requires Windows XP with Service Pack 2, Windows Server 2003 with Service Pack 1, or a later operating system; it is the last version of Microsoft Office to run on Windows XP Professional x64 Edition.Office 2007 includes new applications and server-side tools, including Microsoft Office Groove, a collaboration and communication suite for smaller businesses, which was originally developed by Groove Networks before being acquired by Microsoft in 2005. Also included is Office SharePoint Server 2007, a major revision to the server platform for Office applications, which supports Excel Services, a client-server architecture for supporting Excel workbooks that are shared in real time between multiple machines, and are also viewable and editable through a web page. With Microsoft FrontPage discontinued, Microsoft SharePoint Designer, which is aimed towards development of SharePoint portals, becomes part of the Office 2007 family. Its designer-oriented counterpart, Microsoft Expression Web, is targeted for general web development. However, neither application has been included in Office 2007 software suites. Speech recognition functionality has been removed from the individual programs in the Office 2007 suite, as Windows Speech Recognition was integrated into Windows Vista. Windows XP users must install a previous version of Office to use speech recognition features.According to Forrester Research, as of May 2010, Microsoft Office 2007 is used in 81% of enterprises it surveyed (its sample comprising 115 North American and European enterprise and SMB decision makers).

— Wikipedia

Post

Post

pōst, n. a fixed place, as a military station: a fixed place or stage on a road: an office: one who travels by stages, esp. carrying letters, &c.: a public letter-carrier: an established system of conveying letters: (Shak.) a post-horse: (Shak.) haste: a size of writing-paper, double that of common note-paper (so called from the water-mark, a postman's horn).—v.t. to set or station: to put in the post-office: (book-k.) to transfer from the journal to the ledger: to supply with necessary information, as to post up (cf. Well posted up).—v.i to travel with post-horses, or with speed.—adv. with posthorses: with speed.—ns. Post′age, the act of going by post: journey: money paid for conveyance of letters, &c., by post or mail; Post′age-stamp, an adhesive stamp for affixing to letters to show that the postal charge has been paid.—adj. Post′al, of or pertaining to the mail-service.—ns. Post′-bag, a mail-bag; Post′-bill, a way-bill of the letters sent from a post-office; Post′boy, a boy that rides posthorses, or who carries letters; Post′-card, a stamped card on which a message may be sent by post; Post′-chaise, Post′-char′iot, a chaise or carriage with four wheels let for hire for the conveyance of those who travel with posthorses.—v.i. Post′-chaise, to travel by post-chaise.—ns. Post′-day, the day on which the post or mail arrives or departs; Post′er, one who travels by post: (Shak.) a courier: one who travels expeditiously: a posthorse.—adj. Post′-free, delivered by the post without payment.—n. Posthaste′, haste in travelling like that of a post.—adj. speedy: immediate.—adv. with haste or speed.—ns. Post′-horn, a postman's horn: a horn blown by the driver of a mail-coach; Post′horse, a horse kept for posting; Post′house, a house where horses are kept for the use of parties posting: a post-office; Post′man, a post or courier: a letter-carrier; Post′mark, the mark or stamp put upon a letter at a post-office showing the time and place of reception and delivery; Post′master, the manager or superintendent of a post-office: one who supplies posthorses: at Merton College, Oxford, a scholar who is supported on the foundation; Post′master-Gen′eral, the minister who is the chief officer of the post-office department; Post′-off′ice, an office for receiving and transmitting letters by post: a department of the government which has charge of the reception and conveyance of letters.—adj. Post′-paid, having the postage paid, as a letter.—ns. Post′-time, the time for the despatch or for the delivery of letters; Post′-town, a town with a post-office.—Postal note, a note for a fixed designated sum issued by a postmaster, payable at any office; Postal order, an order issued by the postmaster authorising the holder to receive at some particular post-office payme

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Robotic process automation

Robotic process automation

Robotic process automation (or RPA) is a form of business process automation technology based on metaphorical software robots (bots) or on artificial intelligence (AI)/digital workers.. It is sometimes referred to as software robotics (not to be confused with robot software). In traditional workflow automation tools, a software developer produces a list of actions to automate a task and interface to the back-end system using internal application programming interfaces (APIs) or dedicated scripting language. In contrast, RPA systems develop the action list by watching the user perform that task in the application's graphical user interface (GUI), and then perform the automation by repeating those tasks directly in the GUI. This can lower the barrier to use of automation in products that might not otherwise feature APIs for this purpose. RPA tools have strong technical similarities to graphical user interface testing tools. These tools also automate interactions with the GUI, and often do so by repeating a set of demonstration actions performed by a user. RPA tools differ from such systems that allow data to be handled in and between multiple applications, for instance, receiving email containing an invoice, extracting the data, and then typing that into a bookkeeping system.

— Wikipedia

Building automation

Building automation

Building automation is the automatic centralized control of a building's heating, ventilation and air conditioning, lighting and other systems through a building management system or building automation system (BAS). The objectives of building automation are improved occupant comfort, efficient operation of building systems, reduction in energy consumption and operating costs, and improved life cycle of utilities. Building automation is an example of a distributed control system – the computer networking of electronic devices designed to monitor and control the mechanical, security, fire and flood safety, lighting (especially emergency lighting), HVAC and humidity control and ventilation systems in a building.BAS core functionality keeps building climate within a specified range, provides light to rooms based on an occupancy schedule (in the absence of overt switches to the contrary), monitors performance and device failures in all systems, and provides malfunction alarms to building maintenance staff. A BAS should reduce building energy and maintenance costs compared to a non-controlled building. Most commercial, institutional, and industrial buildings built after 2000 include a BAS. Many older buildings have been retrofitted with a new BAS, typically financed through energy and insurance savings, and other savings associated with pre-emptive maintenance and fault detection. A building controlled by a BAS is often referred to as an intelligent building, "smart building", or (if a residence) a "smart home". In 2018, one of the world's first smart houses was built in Klaukkala, Finland in the form of a five-floor apartment block, utilizing the Kone Residential Flow solution created by KONE, allowing even a smartphone to act as a home key. Commercial and industrial buildings have historically relied on robust proven protocols (like BACnet) while proprietary protocols (like X-10) were used in homes. Recent IEEE standards (notably IEEE 802.15.4, IEEE 1901 and IEEE 1905.1, IEEE 802.21, IEEE 802.11ac, IEEE 802.3at) and consortia efforts like nVoy (which verifies IEEE 1905.1 compliance) or QIVICON have provided a standards-based foundation for heterogeneous networking of many devices on many physical networks for diverse purposes, and quality of service and failover guarantees appropriate to support human health and safety. Accordingly, commercial, industrial, military and other institutional users now use systems that differ from home systems mostly in scale. See home automation for more on entry level systems, nVoy, 1905.1, and the major proprietary vendors who implement or resist this trend to standards integration. Almost all multi-story green buildings are designed to accommodate a BAS for the energy, air and water conservation characteristics. Electrical device demand response is a typical function of a BAS, as is the more sophisticated ventilation and humidity monitoring required of "tight" insulated buildings. Most green buildings also use as many low-power DC devices as possible. Even a passivhaus design intended to consume no net energy whatsoever will typically require a BAS to manage heat capture, shading and venting, and scheduling device use.

— Wikipedia

granular configuration automation

granular configuration automation

A specialized area in the field of Configuration Management that focuses on the visibility and control of an IT Environment's configuration and bill-of-material at the most granular level. IT managers can leverage this strategy to reach the next level of automation and efficiency for their Physical, Virtual or Cloud-based IT environments, and finally close the gap that is responsible for major stability incidents. The application of granular configuration automation empowers IT managers to operate based on complete knowledge of the IT environments that they manage. This knowledge is collected from the granular level of IT environment data, and is collected from any source.

— Wiktionary

Office

Office

of′is, n. settled duty or employment: a position imposing certain duties or giving a right to exercise an employment: business: act of worship: order or form of a religious service, either public or private: that which a thing is designed or fitted to do: a place where business is carried on: (pl.) acts of good or ill: service: the apartments of a house in which the domestics discharge their duties.—ns. Off′ice-bear′er, one who holds office: one who has an appointed duty to perform in connection with some company, society, &c.; Off′icer, one who holds an office: a person who performs some public duty: a person entrusted with responsibility in the army or navy.—v.t. to furnish with officers: to command, as officers.—adj. Offic′ial, pertaining to an office: depending on the proper office or authority: done by authority.—n. one who holds an office: a subordinate public officer: the deputy of a bishop, &c.—ns. Offic′ialism, official position: excessive devotion to official routine and detail; Official′ity, Offic′ialty, the charge, office, or jurisdiction of an official: the official headquarters of an ecclesiastical or other deliberative and governing body.—adv. Offic′ially.—n. Offic′iant, one who officiates at a religious service, one who administers a sacrament.—v.i. Offic′iāte, to perform the duties of an office: (with for) to perform official duties in place of another.—n. Offic′iātor.—Give the office (slang), to suggest, supply information; Holy office, the Inquisition. [Fr.,—L. officium.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

United States Office of Research Integrity

United States Office of Research Integrity

An office of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE organized in June 1992 to promote research integrity and investigate misconduct in research supported by the Public Health Service. It consolidates the Office of Scientific Integrity of the National Institutes of Health and the Office of Scientific Integrity Review in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Valmet

Valmet

Valmet Oyj is a Finnish company and a developer and supplier of technologies, automation systems and services for the pulp, paper and energy industries. Valmet’s history as an industrial operator stretches back over 200 years. Formerly owned by the State of Finland, Valmet was reborn in December 2013 with the demerger of the pulp, paper and power businesses from Metso Corporation. Valmet is organized around four business lines: Services, Pulp and Energy, Paper, and Automation. Valmet's services include maintenance outsourcing, mill and power plant improvements and spare parts. The company provides technology for pulp, tissue, board and paper mills and bioenergy plants. In the area of automation, Valmet's products range from single measurements to mill wide turnkey automation projects. Valmet's operations are divided into five geographical areas: North America, South America, EMEA, China, and Asia-Pacific. Valmet has operations in approximately 30 countries and it employs 12,000 people. Its headquarters are located in Espoo, and it is listed on the Nasdaq Helsinki. In 2017, Valmet's net sales totaled EUR 3.2 billion.

— Wikipedia

Microsoft Office

Microsoft Office

Microsoft Office is an office suite of desktop applications, servers and services for the Microsoft Windows and OS X operating systems, introduced by Microsoft on August 1, 1989. Initially a marketing term for a bundled set of applications, the first version of Office contained Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, and Microsoft PowerPoint. Over the years, Office applications have grown substantially closer with shared features such as a common spell checker, OLE data integration and Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications scripting language. Microsoft also positions Office as a development platform for line-of-business software under the Office Business Applications brand. Office is reported to now be used by over a billion people worldwide. The current versions are Office 2013 for Windows, released on October 11, 2012; and Office 2011 for OS X, released October 26, 2010. On 24 October 2012, the RTM final code of Office 2013 Professional Plus has been released to TechNet and MSDN subscribers for download. On 15 November 2012, the 60-day trial version of Office 2013 Professional Plus was released for download.

— Freebase

Test harness

Test harness

In software testing, a test harness or automated test framework is a collection of software and test data configured to test a program unit by running it under varying conditions and monitoring its behavior and outputs. It has two main parts: the test execution engine and the test script repository. Test harnesses allow for the automation of tests. They can call functions with supplied parameters and print out and compare the results to the desired value. The test harness is a hook to the developed code, which can be tested using an automation framework. A test harness should allow specific tests to run, orchestrate a runtime environment, and provide a capability to analyse results. The typical objectives of a test harness are to: ⁕Automate the testing process. ⁕Execute test suites of test cases. ⁕Generate associated test reports. A test harness may provide some of the following benefits: ⁕Increased productivity due to automation of the testing process. ⁕Increased probability that regression testing will occur. ⁕Increased quality of software components and application. ⁕Ensure that subsequent test runs are exact duplicates of previous ones. ⁕Testing can occur at times that the office is not staffed

— Freebase

Exchange, Telephone

Exchange, Telephone

The office to which telephone wires lead in a general telephone system. In the office by a multiple switch board, or other means, the different telephones are interconnected by the office attendants, so that any customers who desire it may be put into communication with each other. The exchange is often termed the Central Office, although it may be only a branch office.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is an antonym of "grievous"?
  • A. afflictive
  • B. deplorable
  • C. baleful
  • D. trifling