Synonyms containing old(a)

We've found 13,003 synonyms:

Old

Old

ōld, adj. advanced in years: having been long in existence: worn out: out of date, old-fashioned: ancient, former, antique, early: (coll.) great, high: having the age or duration of: long practised: sober, wise.—n. Old-clothes′man, one who buys cast-off garments.—v.i. Old′en, to grow old, to become affected by age.—adj. old, ancient.—adj. Old-fash′ioned, of a fashion like that used long ago: out of date: clinging to old things and old styles: with manners like those of a grown-up person (said of a child).—n. Old-fash′ionedness.—adjs. Old-fō′gyish, like an old fogy; Old-gen′tlemanly, characteristic of an old gentleman; Old′ish, somewhat old; Old′-light, denoting those of the Seceders from the Church of Scotland who continued to hold unchanged the principle of the connection between church and state—the position maintained by the first Seceders in 1733.—n. one of this body.—ns. Old-maid′hood, Old-maid′ism.—adj. Old-maid′ish, like the conventional old maid, prim.—ns. Old′ness; Old′ster (coll.), a man getting old: a midshipman of four years' standing, a master's mate.—adj. Old′-time, of or pertaining to times long gone by: of long standing: old-fashioned.—n. Old′-tim′er, one who has lived in a place or kept a position for a long time.—adjs. Old-wom′anish, like an old woman; Old′-world, belonging to earlier times, antiquated, old-fashioned.—n. the Eastern Hemisphere.—Old age, the later part of life; Old bachelor, an unmarried man somewhat advanced in years; Old English (see English): the form of black letter used by 16th-century English printers; Old gold, a dull gold colour like tarnished gold, used in textile fabrics; Old Harry, Nick, One, &c., the devil; Old Hundred, properly Old Hundredth, a famous tune set in England about the middle of the 16th century to Kethe's version of the 100th Psalm, marked 'Old Hundredth' in Tate and Brady's new version in 1696; Old maid, a woman who has not been married, and is past the usual age of marriage: a simple game played by matching cards from a pack from which a card (usually a queen) has been removed; Old man, unregenerate human nature: (coll.) one's father, guardian, or employer (usually with 'the'); Old Red Sandstone (see Sand); Old salt, an experienced sailor; Old school, of, or resembling, earlier days, old-fashioned; Old song, a mere trifle, a very small price; Old squaw, a sea-duck of the northern hemisphere—also Old wife; Old Style (often written with a date O.S.), the mode of reckoning time before 1752, according to the Julian calendar or year of 365¼ days; Old Testament (see Testament); Old Tom, a strong kind of English gin; Old wife, a prating old woman, or even a man: a chimney-cap for curing smoking.—Of old, long ago, in ancient times, or belonging to such. [A.S. eald; Dut. oud; Ger. alt.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Old Norse

Old Norse

Old Norse is a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia and inhabitants of their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. Proto-Norse developed into Old Norse by the 8th century, and Old Norse began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid- to late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse is found well into the 15th century. Old Norse was divided into three dialects: Old East Norse, Old West Norse, and Old Gutnish. Old West and East Norse formed a dialect continuum, with no clear geographical boundary between them. For example, Old East Norse traits were found in eastern Norway, although Old Norwegian is classified as Old West Norse, and Old West Norse traits were found in western Sweden. Most speakers spoke Old East Norse in what is present day Denmark and Sweden. Old Gutnish, the more obscure dialectal branch, is sometimes included in the Old East Norse dialect due to geographical associations. It developed its own unique features and shared in changes to both other branches. The 12th-century Icelandic Gray Goose Laws state that Swedes, Norwegians, Icelanders and Danes spoke the same language, dǫnsk tunga. Another term used, used especially commonly with reference to West Norse, was norrœnt mál. Today Old Norse has developed into the modern North Germanic languages, and although distinct languages there is still considerable mutual intelligibility.

— Freebase

stoir

stoir

stoir Poem Line: Contrair the flock of Christis stoir, From stanza : And now thay ar with dolour pynde, 
And lyke to raige out of thair mynde 
Because fra thame ze ar declynde, 
And will na lesingis heir. 
Thairfoir thay mak sa greit vproir, 
Contrair the flock of Christis stoir, 
Determit, or thay will geue it ouer, 
To fecht all in to feir. Taken from Remember Man, Remember Man For Christmas Words and Music: Scottish Traditional Source: John Wedderburn, A Compendious Book of Godly and Spiritual Songs Commonly Known as 'The Gude and Godlie Ballatis.' Reprinted from the Edition of 1567, A. F. Mitchell, ed. (Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons, 1897), p. 200-204. stoir in hi-stoir-e histoire or history from Greek histor wise, learned, learned man, wise man, Egyptian priest-caste, shaman, wisdom, doctor, traditional medicine healer, astronomer, knowledge also stoir is stoic logic endurance waiting from proto European root deru from Africanization west Africa Yoruba iduro meaning stable, firm, steadfast, moonshot shamanic journey to outer space or literally space craft to the moon, Zulu merkaba van to outer space, also meaning a significant venture life changing requires endurance or patiently trustingly waiting as in betrothed in love to last a long time from deru is root to Druid der and drews or drus oak and wied to see dru-wied druid the seer the Priest. PIE deru Derivatives include tree, trust, betroth, endure, druid. 1. Suffixed variant form *drew-o-. a. tree from Old English trēow, tree, from Germanic *trewam; b. truce from Old English trēow, pledge, from Germanic *treuwō. 2. Variant form dreu-. a. true from Old English trēowe, firm, true; b. trow from Old English trēowian, trūwian, to trust; c. trig1 from Old Norse tryggr, firm, true; d. troth, truth; betroth from Old English trēowth, faith, loyalty, truth, from Germanic abstract noun *treuwithō; e. trust from Old Norse traust, confidence, firmness, from Germanic abstract noun *traustam; f. tryst from Old French triste, waiting place (

— Editors Contribution

Old Boys

Old Boys

The terms Old Boys and Old Girls are the usual expressions in use in the United Kingdom for former pupils or alumni of primary and secondary schools. While these are traditionally associated with independent schools, they are also used for some schools in the state sector. The term is also used for those who attended New Zealand schools, Sri Lankan schools, a few universities in the UK and, to a lesser extent, schools in Australia, Canada and South Africa. The Old Boy form is given a specific identification for each school. Some schools use an adjectival form of the school name, such as "Old Etonian", "Old Harrovian", "Old Oswestrian","Old Kimboltonian" or "Old Reptonian". Some use a Latin form derived from the Latin name of the school or its location as "Old Novaportan". Some are based on the name of the founder, such as "Old Wykehamist" and "Old Alleynian". Some are based on the school's location or street, such as "Old Gowers". Many of the schools have histories dating back several hundred years, and the Old Boy forms may have been in use for a hundred years or more. Other more recently established schools have devised Old Boy names that are distinctive to prevent confusion with other schools. The tradition for many girls schools has been to use the term "Seniors" rather than "Old Girls".

— Freebase

Old Swedish

Old Swedish

Old Swedish is the name for two separate stages of the Swedish language that were spoken in the Middle Ages: Early Old Swedish, spoken from around 1225 until 1375, and Late Old Swedish, spoken from 1375 until 1526. Old Swedish developed from Old East Norse, the eastern dialect of Old Norse. The earliest forms of the Swedish and Danish languages, spoken between the years 800 and 1100, were dialects of Old East Norse and are referred to as Runic Swedish and Runic Danish because at the time all texts were written in the runic alphabet. The differences were only minute, however, and the dialects truly began to diverge around the 12th century, becoming Old Swedish and Old Danish in the 13th century. It is not known when exactly Old Gutnish and Elfdalian began to diverge from Swedish, but Old Gutnish diverged long before Old Danish did. Early Old Swedish was markedly different from modern Swedish in that it had a more complex case structure and had not yet experienced a reduction of the gender system and thus had three genders. Nouns, adjectives, pronouns and certain numerals were inflected in four cases: nominative, genitive, dative and accusative.

— Freebase

Old cat

Old cat

Old cat (also known as ol' cat or cat-ball) games were bat-and-ball, safe haven games played in North America. The games were numbered according to the number of bases. The number of bases varied according to the number of players. Only one old cat continues to be commonly played in the 21st century. One old cat, one eyed cat, or the contracted one-o'-cat was the basic version of the game, with a pitcher or giver; a batter or striker; a catcher, and sometimes another fielder or two. The striker, upon hitting the ball thrown by the giver, attempted to run to a single base (often the giver's position) and back again. The fielders tried to sting the striker-runner with a thrown ball while he or she was not touching the base. The striker would also be put out if the struck ball were caught in the air, or if they swung three times at the giver's deliveries and missed. One old cat, like scrub baseball, was a game of individuals—one against all—and not a team sport. Each base touched before 'out' (or just home) would score a point, although score was often not kept. In his book Base-Ball, John Montgomery Ward wrote that to initiate a game of one old cat, players called out a number to claim a position: one, two, etc.—one being the striker, two being the pitcher, and three the catcher. When an out was made the striker moved to the last position (e.g. five), five became four, four moved to three, three moved to two, and two took a turn as striker—the coveted position. Ward said that if more players were available for the game, there would be two batters opposite each other (as in cricket), and they ran to the opposite base when the ball was hit. This was two old cat. [1] Three old cat had a triangular base layout and three strikers, while four old cat had four strikers and four bases in a square pattern. The Mills Commission, formed in 1905 to ascertain the origins of baseball, recorded many reminiscences of people playing three and four old cat in their youth. Baseball historian Harold Seymour reported that old cat games were still being played on the streets and vacant lots of Brooklyn in the 1920s. Albert Spalding suggested that four old cat was the immediate ancestor of town ball, from which baseball evolved. David Block's recent research indicates that old cat games evolved alongside baseball, as informal or practice versions when there were not enough players for a full game. The Detroit Tigers used old cat as a training exercise at least as late as their 1928 spring training trip to San Antonio, Texas, under manager George Moriarity.One old cat is seeing a resurgence as a batting and fielding training game for younger little league and girl softball teams. Two games are played simultaneously on one diamond, one on the home third line and the other on the first-second line. Because the game is faster-paced than baseball and includes position rotation as a normal element, the chief objection young people voice about baseball, idle time in the field or waiting to bat, is directly addressed. The usual version is one-against-all and otherwise similar to that described above except, for safety, no stinging. The game is also well played with light plastic substitute balls where space is restricted.

— Wikipedia

Proto-Romance

Proto-Romance

Form of Vulgar Latin immediately preceding diffusion into separate old forms of Romance (eg. Old French, Old Spanish, Old Italian, etc.). Also referred to as Common Romance.

— Wiktionary

VENERABLE

VENERABLE

calling forth respect through age, character, and attainments;broadly : conveying an impression of aged goodness and benevolence; deserving to be venerated;Belonging to, existing, or occurring in times long past:age-old, ancient, antediluvian, antiquated, antique, archaic, hoary, old, olden, old-time, timeworn. Idioms: old as Methuselah, old as the hills. respected, august, sage, revered, honoured, wise, esteemed, reverenced;profoundly honored,revered, august,hallowed, revered, reverend, sacred,characterized by decadence, especially culturally or morally.

— Editors Contribution

Old Hickory

Old Hickory

Old Hickory is a section of metropolitan Nashville named in honor of President Andrew Jackson who was nicknamed "Old Hickory." This area is located in the Hadley Bend section of eastern Davidson County. The area is probably best known for being a former company town as the site of a large DuPont plant. Many of the houses in Old Hickory were built to house Dupont employees and supervisors in the early days of the factory's existence. Old Hickory is bordered by the Cumberland River on the north and west, Old Hickory Lake to the east, and the former city of Lakewood to the south. To the north of the area is also the location of Old Hickory Lock and Dam. The main street through the area is Old Hickory Boulevard. The area today is the site of a country club, large golf course, city park, a Chamber of Commerce, and the Dupont plant, which has been mostly shut down but continues to employ a few hundred workers. The Nashville National Weather Service Forecast Office is located just to the southeast in nearby Wilson County, but it has an Old Hickory mailing address. Old Hickory has its own post office, assigned ZIP Code 37138. The postal service area that uses the "Old Hickory" mailing address includes portions of Wilson and Davidson counties.

— Freebase

cavalry and artillery horse

cavalry and artillery horse

Horses generally make in a minute, at ordinary pace, 120 steps, and they cover 110 yards; at a trot, 180 steps, covering 220 yards; and at a gallop, 100 steps or strides, covering 352 yards; from which it would appear that the length of the stride at the ordinary pace is about 0.917 yard, and that the velocity corresponds to about 1.74 yards per second; and at a trot the stride is about 1.28 yards and the speed about 3.68 yards per second; and at a gallop the stride is about 3.52 yards, with a speed of about 5.87 yards per second. A good horse carrying a weight of 225 pounds, can travel, without over-exertion, 25 miles in a day of from seven to eight hours; his speed in this case would be between 1.75 and 1.53 yards per second. The weight of an average-sized horse is about from 900 to 1350 pounds. The age of the horse is determined by the appearance of the teeth, which vary according to the number of years the animal has attained, and may be easily understood by a slight attention to the subject; the number, quality, and size of the teeth indicating the respective ages. The lower front teeth or nippers are those by which the age of a colt is usually determined. At two years old these teeth will be complete; that is to say, the colt will have a full set, six in number, of milch-teeth. Between two and three years old the two centre teeth are displaced, and two permanent teeth succeed them, easily distinguished from colt’s teeth by being broader, larger, and having a dark cavity in the centre of the upper surface. At three years old the colt will have in the lower jaw two permanent and four colt’s teeth; between the third and fourth year the next pair of incisor teeth will be shed, and permanent teeth succeed them. At four years old there will be four permanent teeth in the centre, and two colt’s teeth at each corner of the lower jaw. Between the fourth and fifth year the last remaining colt’s nipper, or corner tooth, will be cast; and, if a horse or gelding, the tushes, four in number, will show themselves, two in the upper and two in the lower jaw. At five years old the horse will have a full or complete set of permanent teeth in the upper and lower jaws; for the same change that takes place in the lower is developed in the upper jaw also. The colt at this age takes the name of horse, and is supposed to be equal to all the laborious duties expected from him. Although we can no longer judge of his age by the shifting or shedding of his teeth, we can form a tolerably correct conclusion from other appearances of them. At six years old the dark oval-shaped mark in the centre of the two front nippers, usually called by horsemen “the bean,” will be nearly or quite worn away; the tushes higher and stronger, and the cavities of the interior part of the tooth more filled; the two corner nippers level with the others, and equally developed. At seven years old the marks in the second pair of nippers are filled up, and the tushes become more round externally and internally. At eight years old the marks in the corner nippers are worn out, and the tushes more round and blunt. From this age the animal is said to be, in horse phraseology, “past knowledge”; and although a tolerably correct opinion may be formed for many years to come by the appearance of the upper jaw and other prognostics, still they cannot be implicitly relied on. It often occurs at a much earlier period that the best judges of age are deceived by the untimely structural alteration of the teeth, produced by mechanical or pathological causes, such as crib-biting, biting the rack or manger, eating hard food, etc. Horses used for cavalry in the United States are selected with regard to climate, the American horse east of the Rocky Mountains, and what is known as the Mexican or bronco, west of the Rocky Mountains; the power of endurance of the latter being much more than that of the former, they are better adapted to the rugged, arid country that an American cavalry soldier has to travel over on the western frontier. For artillery large, strong American horses are used. A horse occupies a space in the ranks of a front of 40 inches, a depth of 10 feet; in a stall, from 31⁄2 to 41⁄2 feet front; at picket 3 feet by 9. Cavalry horses usually charge at the rate of 24 miles per hour, or one mile in 21⁄2 minutes. See Pack and Draught Horses.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

Old Norman

Old Norman

Old Norman, also called Old Northern French or Old Norman French, was one of many langues d'oïl dialects. It was spoken throughout the region of what is now called Normandy and spread into England, Southern Italy, Sicily, and the Levant. It is the ancestor of modern Norman, including the insular dialects, as well as Anglo-Norman. Old Norman is similar to and often confused with Old French, which is sometimes used to describe all langues d'oïl dialects together. Old Norman was an important language of the Principality of Antioch during Crusader rule in the Levant. Old Norman contained many Norse loanwords unknown in Old French at that time. Writings of the Jersey-born poet Wace are among the few records of Old Norman that remain.

— Freebase

Ingvaeonic

Ingvaeonic

North Sea Germanic, a postulated grouping of the West Germanic languages that comprises Old Frisian, Old English and Old Saxon.

— Wiktionary

old fartism

old fartism

The state of being an old fart, of being old and having old-fashioned views.

— Wiktionary

Cat

Cat

an old game; (a) The game of tipcat and the implement with which it is played. See Tipcat. (c) A game of ball, called, according to the number of batters, one old cat, two old cat, etc

— Webster Dictionary

Gammer

Gammer

an old wife; an old woman; -- correlative of gaffer, an old man

— Webster Dictionary

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