Synonyms containing p.eng

We've found 300 synonyms:

B

B

is the second letter of the English alphabet. (See Guide to Pronunciation, // 196, 220.) It is etymologically related to p, v, f, w and m , letters representing sounds having a close organic affinity to its own sound; as in Eng. bursar and purser; Eng. bear and Lat. ferre; Eng. silver and Ger. silber; Lat. cubitum and It. gomito; Eng. seven, Anglo-Saxon seofon, Ger. sieben, Lat. septem, Gr."epta`, Sanskrit saptan. The form of letter B is Roman, from Greek B (Beta), of Semitic origin. The small b was formed by gradual change from the capital B

— Webster Dictionary

Doctor of Engineering

Doctor of Engineering

The Doctor of Engineering, or Engineering Doctorate, (abbreviated Eng.D., D.Eng., D.Engr., Dr.Eng., or Dr.-Ing.) is a doctoral degree awarded on the basis of advanced study and research in engineering and applied sciences. In most countries, it is a terminal research doctorate. In the United Kingdom and Germany it is a higher doctorate. An EngD degree is essentially an engineering PhD with a solid industrial base and an additional taught element. Along with the PhD, it represents the highest academic qualification in engineering. Successful completion of an EngD or PhD in engineering is required to gain employment as a full-time, tenure-track university professor or postdoctoral researcher in the field. As with other earned research doctorates, individuals with the degree are awarded the academic title doctor, which is often represented via the English honorific "Dr." EngD candidates submit a significant project, typically referred to as a thesis, dissertation, or praxis, consisting of a body of original academic research that is in principle worthy of publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Candidates must defend this work before a panel of expert examiners called a thesis, dissertation, or doctoral committee.

— Wikipedia

Conjoined twins

Conjoined twins

Conjoined twins are identical twins joined in utero. A rare phenomenon, the occurrence is estimated to range from 1 in 50,000 births to 1 in 200,000 births, with a somewhat higher incidence in Southwest Asia and Africa. Approximately half are stillborn, and a smaller fraction of pairs born alive have abnormalities incompatible with life. The overall survival rate for conjoined twins is approximately 25%. The condition is more frequently found among females, with a ratio of 3:1. Two contradicting theories exist to explain the origins of conjoined twins. The older theory is fission, in which the fertilized egg splits partially. The second and more generally accepted theory is fusion, in which a fertilized egg completely separates, but stem cells find like-stem cells on the other twin and fuse the twins together. Conjoined twins share a single common chorion, placenta, and amniotic sac, although these characteristics are not exclusive to conjoined twins as there are some monozygotic but non-conjoined twins that also share these structures in utero. The most famous pair of conjoined twins was Chang and Eng Bunker, Thai brothers born in Siam, now Thailand. They travelled with P.T. Barnum's circus for many years and were billed as the Siamese Twins. Chang and Eng were joined by a band of flesh, cartilage, and their fused livers at the torso. In modern times, they could have been easily separated. Due to the brothers' fame and the rarity of the condition, the term "Siamese twins" came to be used as a synonym for conjoined twins.

— Freebase

Oxford spelling

Oxford spelling

Oxford spelling is the spelling used by Oxford University Press, including in its Oxford English Dictionary, and other publishers who are "etymology conscious", according to Merriam-Webster. Apart from OUP, British dictionary publishers that use it include Cassell, Collins, and Longman. In digital documents it may be indicated by the language tag en-GB-oed. Oxford spelling can be recognized by its use of the suffix ‑ize instead of -ise: organization, privatize and recognizable instead of organisation, privatise and recognisable. The spelling affects about 200 verbs, and is favoured on etymological grounds, in that -ize corresponds more closely to the Greek root, -izo, of most -ize verbs. The suffix -ize has been in use in the UK since the 16th century, and continues to be the spelling used in American English. Since the 1990s, -ise has become more common in the UK, with the result that -ize may be regarded incorrectly as an exclusively American variant. The OED lists the -ise form of words separately, as "a frequent spelling of -IZE...". The OED explains its use of -ize as follows: [I]n mod.F. the suffix has become -iser, alike in words from Greek, as baptiser, évangéliser, organiser, and those formed after them from L., as civiliser, cicatriser, humaniser. Hence, some have used the spelling -ise in Eng., as in French, for all these words, and some prefer -ise in words formed in French or Eng. from L. elements, retaining -ize for those of Gr. composition. But the suffix itself, whatever the element to which it is added, is in its origin the Gr. -ιζειν, L. -izāre; and, as the pronunciation is also with z, there is no reason why in English the special French spelling should be followed, in opposition to that which is at once etymological and phonetic. In this Dictionary the termination is uniformly written -ize.

— Freebase

D

D

the fourth letter of the English alphabet, and a vocal consonant. The English letter is from Latin, which is from Greek, which took it from Ph/nician, the probable ultimate origin being Egyptian. It is related most nearly to t and th; as, Eng. deep, G. tief; Eng. daughter, G. tochter, Gr. qyga`thr, Skr. duhitr. See Guide to Pronunciation, Ã178, 179, 229.

— Webster Dictionary

abietite

abietite

A substance resembling mannite, found in the needles of the common silver fir of Europe (Abies pectinata) - Eng. Cyc

— Wiktionary

bushel

bushel

The iron lining in the nave of a wheel. [Eng.] In the United States it is called a box.

— Wiktionary

firkin

firkin

A varying measure of capacity, usually being the fourth part of a barrel; specifically, a measure equal to nine imperial gallons. [Eng.]

— Wiktionary

heng

heng

a character (uA727), combining an h and an eng, which stands for the hypothetical phoneme in English which includes both [h] and [u014B] as its allophones.

— Wiktionary

Electronic news-gathering

Electronic news-gathering

Electronic news-gathering (ENG) is when reporters and editors make use of electronic video and audio technologies in order to gather and present news. ENG can involve anything from a single reporter with a single professional video camera, to an entire television crew taking a truck on location. This term was coined during the rise of videotape technology in the 1970s. This term was commonly used in the television news in the 1980s and '90s, but is used less frequently now, as the technology has become commonplace.Electronic news-gathering can involve anything from a lone reporter taking a single professional video camera out to shoot a story, to an entire television crew taking a production or satellite truck on-location to conduct a live news report for an outside newscast. The vehicle on which the electronic equipment is fitted is called DSNG (digital satellite news gathering).

— Wikipedia

Bidding-prayer

Bidding-prayer

A Bidding-prayer (O. Eng. biddan, "to pray", cf. Ger. beten) is the formula of prayer or exhortation to prayer said during worship in churches of the Anglican Communion. It occurs during the liturgy of the word, prior to the sermon. Such formulae are found in the ancient Greek liturgies, e.g. that of St. Chrysostom, in the Gallican liturgy, and in the pre-Reformation liturgies of England. The form varies, but in all the characteristic feature is that the minister tells the people what to pray for (e.g., the 1662 Book of Common Prayer bidding-prayer form begins, "Let us pray for Christ's holy Catholic Church," provides specifics, and then moves on to the next bidding). It is an informal intercessory prayer, covering a wide variety of concerns such as the church, the state, the living and the dead, and public and private necessities. In England in the 16th century it took the form of a direction to the people what to remember in telling their beads. In the course of time the word bid in the sense of pray became obsolete and was confused with bid in the sense of command (from O. Eng. beodan, to offer, present, and hence to announce, or command; cf. Ger. bieten, to offer, gebieten, to command), and the bidding-prayer came practically to mean the exhortation itself. A form of exhortation which preachers and ministers shall move the people to join with them in prayer is given in the 55th canon of the Church of England (1603).In contemporary usage, the term "bidding-prayer" has largely been replaced by "intercessory prayers" or "prayers of the people". In keeping with Anglican custom, these are still said according to one or more Prayer Book templates, but are generally designed in such a way that specific topical, seasonal, or cyclical petitions can be added. On occasion, the person leading the prayers will still introduce each petition with the phrase, "I bid your prayers for..." A bidding prayer is offered at the beginning of the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols observed at King's College, Cambridge University, on Christmas Eve; this prayer, whose text has remained largely unaltered since the Festival's inception in 1918, has been heard annually in radio broadcasts of the Festival since the 1930s. Lutheran church services also include bidding prayers, although they are typically called "prayers of intercession" or "prayers of the people". Some Methodist churches also include bidding prayers.

— Wikipedia

Engadin

Engadin

The Engadin or Engadine ( ENG-gə-deen, also US: ENG-gə-DEEN; Romansh: Engiadina; German: Engadin; Italian: Engadina; French: Engadine) is a long high Alpine valley region in the eastern Swiss Alps in the canton of Graubünden in southeasternmost Switzerland with about 25,000 inhabitants. It follows the route of the Inn (Romansh: En) from its headwaters at Maloja Pass in the southwest running roughly northeast until the Inn flows into Austria, one hundred kilometers downstream. The En/Inn subsequently flows at Passau into the Danube, making it the only Swiss river to drain into the Black Sea. The Engadine is protected by high mountain ranges on all sides and is famous for its sunny climate, beautiful landscapes and outdoor activities.

— Wikipedia

English

English

ing′glish, adj. belonging to England or its inhabitants.—n. the language of the people of England.—v.t. to translate a book into English: to make English.—ns. Eng′lander, an Englishman; Eng′lisher, Eng′lishman, a native or naturalised inhabitant of England; Eng′lishry, the fact of being an Englishman; in Ireland, the population of English descent.—Old English, or Anglo-Saxon, the language spoken in England from 450 till about 1150; Middle English till 1500; Modern English from 1500 onwards (Early English often means Early Middle English; (archit.), see Early).—Presentment of Englishry, the offering of proof that a person murdered belonged to the English race, to escape the fine levied on the hundred or township for the murder of a Norman. [A.S. Englisc, from Engle, Angle, from the Angles who settled in Britain.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

sporned

sporned

Old Eng. from poem of Robin Hood: 'He sporned the doré with his fote...' (Kicked it down)

— Editors Contribution

MoviePass

MoviePass

MoviePass is a subscription service that allows customers the freedom to see movies in theaters at a fixed monthly price.With the use of location based mobile technologies the user will have the ability to check into their movie theater of choice and share their movie going experiences with their peers through their favorite social networks. The user will also have the ability to rate each movie and theater experience after the film. MoviePass is the the nation's premier movie theater subscription service, providing film enthusiasts the ability to attend unlimited movies. Founded by leading technology and entertainment entrepreneurs Stacy Spikes and Hamet Watt, MoviePass is backed by major investors including AOL Ventures, True Ventures, Lambert Media, Moxie Pictures, Brian Lee, Diego Berdakin, MJ Eng, Ryan Steelberg and Adam Lilling. Launched in 2010, the company is headquartered in New York. For more information or to request an invite, visit www.moviepass.com.

— CrunchBase

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
An antonym for "pesky"
  • A. pettish
  • B. plaguey
  • C. agreeable
  • D. pestilent