Synonyms containing pace egg

We've found 1,662 synonyms:

Pace

Pace

Pace is the suburban bus division of the Regional Transportation Authority in the Chicago metropolitan area. It was created in 1983 by the RTA Act, which established the formula that provides funding to CTA, Metra and Pace. In 2010, Pace had 35.077 million riders. Pace's headquarters are in Arlington Heights, Illinois. Pace is governed by a 13 member Board of Directors, 12 of which are current and former suburban mayors, with the other being the Commissioner of the [Chicago] Mayor's Office for People with Disabilities, to represent the city's paratransit riders. The six counties that Pace serves are Cook, Lake, Will, Kane, McHenry and DuPage. Some of Pace's buses also go to Chicago and Indiana. In some areas, notably Evanston and Skokie, Pace and Chicago Transit Authority both serve the community. Many of Pace's hubs are located at CTA rail stations and Metra stations. CTA and Pace transit cards are valid on Pace, but Pace cards and passes are not valid on the CTA. Additionally, since CTA no longer issues transfers with cash bus fares, it no longer accepts Pace transfers, either, but Pace transfers remain good between Pace routes. Pace honors some, but not all CTA passes; CTA and Pace have established a new joint 7-day pass, in substitution for the CTA 7-day pass, which Pace no longer accepts. Metra fares are completely separate.

— Freebase

Egg

Egg

eg, n. an oval body laid by birds and certain other animals, from which their young are produced: anything shaped like an egg.—ns. Egg′-app′le, or plant, the brinjal or aubergine, an East Indian annual with egg-shaped fruit; Egg′-bird, a sooty tern; Egg′-cō′sy, a covering put over boiled eggs to keep in the heat after being taken from the pot: Egg′-cup, a cup for holding an egg at table; Egg′er, Egg′ler, one who collects eggs; Egg′ery, a place where eggs are laid; Egg′-flip, a hot drink made of ale, with eggs, sugar, spice, &c.; Egg′-glass, a small sand-glass for regulating the boiling of eggs; Egg′-nog, a drink compounded of eggs and hot beer, spirits, &c.; Egg′-shell, the shell or calcareous substance which covers the eggs of birds; Egg′-slice, a kitchen utensil for lifting fried eggs out of a pan; Egg′-spoon, a small spoon used in eating eggs from the shell.—A bad egg (coll.), a worthless person; Put all one's eggs into one basket, to risk all on one enterprise; Take eggs for money, to be put off with mere promises of payment; Teach your grandmother to suck eggs, spoken contemptuously to one who would teach those older and wiser than himself; Tread upon eggs, to walk warily, to steer one's way carefully in a delicate situation. [A.S. æg; cf. Ice. egg, Ger. ei, perh. L. ovum, Gr. ōon.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Egg white

Egg white

Egg white is the common name for the clear liquid contained within an egg. In chickens it is formed from the layers of secretions of the anterior section of the hen's oviduct during the passage of the egg. It forms around either fertilized or unfertilized egg yolks. The primary natural purpose of egg white is to protect the yolk and provide additional nutrition for the growth of the embryo. Egg white consists primarily of about 90% water into which is dissolved 10% proteins. Unlike the yolk, which is high in lipids, egg white contains almost no fat, and carbohydrate content is less than 1%. Egg whites contain just over 50% of the protein in the egg. Egg white has many uses in food and also many other uses.

— Freebase

Century egg

Century egg

Century egg or pidan, also known as preserved egg, hundred-year egg, thousand-year egg, thousand-year-old egg, and millennium egg, is a Chinese cuisine ingredient made by preserving duck, chicken or quail eggs in a mixture of clay, ash, salt, quicklime, and rice hulls for several weeks to several months, depending on the method of processing. Through the process, the yolk becomes a dark green to grey colour, with a creamy consistency and an odor of sulphur and ammonia, while the white becomes a dark brown, translucent jelly with little flavour. The transforming agent in the century egg is its alkaline material, which gradually raises the pH of the egg to around 9 - 12, or more during the curing process. This chemical process breaks down some of the complex, flavorless proteins and fats, which produces a variety of smaller flavorful compounds. Some eggs have patterns near the surface of the egg white that are likened to pine branches, and that gives rise to one of its Chinese names, the pine-patterned egg.

— Freebase

Egg cup

Egg cup

An egg cup, sometimes called egg server, is a container used for serving boiled eggs within their shell. Egg cups have an upwardly concave portion to hold the egg and often include a base to raise the egg retaining portion and give stability, informally known as footies. Egg cups can be made of Porcelain, pottery, wood, plastic, glass and various metals or bakelite. Some are made of two materials. The Egg cup is a collectible item. There is a newsletter available through email for egg cup collectors "Eggcup Collectors' Corner". There are also egg cup conventions for collectors in England. Collecting egg cups is called Pocillovy, deriving from the Latin pocillum for small cup and ovi for eggs.

— Freebase

Nihilator

Nihilator

Nihilator (1982–1991) was an American champion Standardbred racehorse and was the United States Harness Horse of the Year in 1985. \The first standardbred to win $3 million, at the time of his retirement he was the leading stakes earning pacer in harness racing history.As a two year old in 1984 Nihilator won his first twelve races before finishing second behind Dragon's Lair in the Breeders Crown. His winning streak included a win in the Woodrow Wilson Pace, a race that was the richest run for either the Thoroughbred or Standardbred breed at the time. His winning time of 1:52 4/5 was a world record for a two year old pacer. He was the 2-Year Old Colt Pacer of the Year for 1984. Early in 1985 a 30 percent interest in Nihilator was sold for $5.76m to Almahurst Farm. He won the 1985 Meadowlands Pace by 7 1/4 lengths equalling the world record for a pacer of any age with a time of 1:50 3/5. The last half mile was covered in 54 seconds. It was Nihilator's 18th win from 19 races. In the Adios Pace at The Meadows Nihilator was surprisingly beaten in the first heat by Marauder, won the second heat and was scratched from the race-off. Nihilator had bettered his Meadowlands Pace winning time when he won a race in 1:49 3/5 at The Meadowlands setting world record for the fastest race ever with quarter mile splits of 26 2/5, 53 4/5 and 1:21 2/5 before attempting to break the world record of 1:49 1/5 set by his sire Niatross in a time trial in 1980. In his time trial at Springfield he slowed running into a head wind in the last quarter mile running a time of 1:50 4/5.Nihilator started in the 1985 Little Brown Jug less than a week after winning the James Dancer Memorial at Freehold Raceway. It was his first start on a half mile track. Nihilator took the Jug with heat wins in 1:53 1/5 and 1:52 1/5. On the same day Falcon Seelster won a race recording a half mile track world record mile of 1:51. Nihilator scored an easy win in the Walt Whitman Pace before he ended his racing career with a win in the Breeders Crown at Garden State Park. For 1985 he won 23 of 25 starts and also won the Tattersalls Pace and Bluegrass Stake. In his career Nihilator won 35 of 38 races and $3,225,754. He was the first Standardbred to earn $3 million.In 1995, Nihilator United States Harness Racing Hall of FameNihilator was humanely destroyed in November 1991 after suffering from Potomac horse fever and laminitis.

— Wikipedia

Pace

Pace

pās, n. a stride: the space between the feet in walking, 30 inches, a step: gait: rate of walking (of a man or beast): rate of speed in movement or work, often applied to fast living: mode of stepping in horses in which the legs on the same side are lifted together: amble: (obs.) a passage.—v.t. to measure by steps: to cause to progress: to train in walking or stepping.—v.i. to walk: to walk slowly: to amble.—adj. Paced, having a certain pace or gait.—ns. Pace′-mak′er, one who sets the pace, as in a race; Pac′er, one who paces: a horse whose usual gait is a pace.—Keep, or Hold, pace with, to go as fast as: to keep up with. [Fr. pas—L. passus, a step—pandĕre, passum, to stretch.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

pace

pace

(Lat. passus). In its modern acceptation, is the distance, when the legs are extended in walking, between the heel of one foot and that of the other. Among disciplined men the pace becomes one of constant length, and as such is of the utmost value in determining military movements, the relative distances of corps and men being fixed by the number of paces marched, and so on. The pace varies in different countries; in the United States it is 28 inches direct step, and 33 double step; in Great Britain 30 inches direct step, and 33 double step. With the Romans the pace had a different signification; the single extension of the legs was not with them a pace (passus), but a step (gradus); their pace being the interval between the mark of a heel and the next mark of the same heel, or a double step. This pace was equivalent to 4.84 English feet.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

World egg

World egg

The world egg, cosmic egg or mundane egg is a mythological motif found in the cosmogonies of many cultures that descends from the proto-Indo-European culture and other cultures and civilizations. Typically, the world egg is a beginning of some sort, and the universe or some primordial being comes into existence by "hatching" from the egg, sometimes lain on the primordial waters of the Earth.Eggs symbolize the unification of two complementary principles (represented by the egg white and the yolk) from that life or existence, in its most fundamental philosophical sense, emerges.

— Wikipedia

Egg

Egg

In zoology, an egg is an organic vessel in which an embryo first begins to develop. In most birds, reptiles, insects, molluscs, fish, and monotremes, an egg is the zygote, resulting from fertilization of the ovum, which is expelled from the body and permitted to develop outside the body until the developing embryo can survive on its own. The term "egg" is used differently outside the animal kingdom, for an egg cell. Reproductive structures similar to the egg in other kingdoms are termed spores, or seeds. Oviparous animals are animals that lay eggs, with little or no other development within the mother. The study or collecting of eggs, particularly bird eggs, is called oology. Reptile eggs, bird eggs, and monotreme eggs, which are laid out of water, are surrounded by a protective shell, either flexible or inflexible. The special membranes that support these eggs are traits of all amniotes, including mammals. Eggs laid on land or in nests are usually kept within a favourable temperature range while the embryo grows. When the embryo is adequately developed it breaks out of the egg's shell. This breaking out is known as hatching. Baby animals which have just hatched are hatchlings, though standard names for babies of particular species continue to apply, such as chick for a baby chicken. Some embryos have a temporary egg tooth with which to crack, pip, or break the eggshell or covering.

— Freebase

Bad egg

Bad egg

Bad egg is a children's playground ball game played in Great Britain and other countries. One player is chosen as the 'Bad Egg' and turns their back to the other players. 'Bad Egg' then asks the others to each name something from a particular group. Once each player has answered, the 'Bad Egg' throws a tennis ball over their shoulder, and shouts out one of the answers that had been given by the other players. All players, except 'Bad Egg', run in different directions and the person whose answer was shouted out has to run after the ball, and calls "stop" when they retrieve it. On hearing the word "stop," all players, including the one who went after the ball, remain stationary. All players, except the one with the ball, stand with their legs apart. The player with the ball then attempts to roll it under the legs of one of the other players. If successful, that player becomes 'Bad Egg'. If unsuccessful, the player who retrieved the ball becomes 'Bad Egg'.

— Freebase

Egg wash

Egg wash

An egg wash is usually beaten eggs sometimes mixed with another liquid, usually water or milk, which is brushed onto the surface of a pastry before baking. An egg wash is often used to make pastries shiny and golden or brown in color, and it also is used to help toppings or coatings stick to the surface of the pastry, or to bind pastry parts together, such as empanadas or other en croute recipes. Egg wash can usually be made with 30 ml or two tablespoons of liquid, such as milk or water, for every egg. Less liquid makes for a darker wash. The part of the egg used and liquid added determines the finished look of the crust. Vegan substitutes for egg wash include vegetable oil, non-dairy milk and butter substitutes, and light corn syrup thinned with water. Egg washes can also be used on calzoni or on fish.

— Freebase

eggs

eggs

These nutritious articles of food might be used longer at sea than is usual. The shell of the egg abounds with small pores, through which the aqueous part of the albumen constantly exhales, and the egg in consequence daily becomes lighter, and approaches its decomposition. Reaumur varnished them all over, and thus preserved eggs fresh for two years; then carefully removing the varnish, he found that such eggs were still capable of producing chickens. Some employ, with the same intention, lard or other fatty substance for closing the pores, and others simply immerse the egg for an instant in boiling water, by which its albumen is in part coagulated, and the power of exhalation thereby checked. Eggs packed in lime-water suffered to drain, have after three years' absence in the West Indies been found good; this does not destroy vitality.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

Akuri

Akuri

Akuri is a spicy scrambled egg dish eaten in Parsi cuisine of India. Akuri is cooked until almost runny; the eggs are never overcooked. The main flavouring is fried onions and the spices used are ginger, coriander, chopped chilis, and black pepper. Akuri is traditionally eaten with pav or double roti (types of Indian bread). A less common version of akuri is bharuchi akuri, which contains nuts and dry fruits like cashews and raisins in addition to the other spices. This dish supposedly originated from the city of Bharuch in Gujarat, hence the name. Egg bhurji is a similar egg dish eaten in many parts of the Indian subcontinent. Connoisseurs of these 'Indian' scrambled egg varieties would argue that egg bhurjee and akuri are almost identical but distinct in taste.

— Wikipedia

pace

pace

A measure, often used for reconnoitring objects. The common pace is 2-1/2 feet, or half the geometrical pace. The pace is also often roughly assumed as a yard.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

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Quiz

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. chancy
  • B. dicey
  • C. iffy
  • D. certain