Synonyms containing pass off by degrees or gradually

We've found 15,309 synonyms:

Pass

Pass

pas, v.i. to pace or walk onward: to move from one place or state to another: to travel: to change: to circulate: to be regarded: to go by: to go unheeded or neglected: to elapse, as time: to be finished: to move away: to disappear: (B.) to pass away: to go through an examination or an inspection: to be approved: to meet with acceptance: to happen: to fall, as by inheritance: to flow through: to thrust, as with a sword: to run, as a road.—v.t. to go by, over, beyond, through, &c.: to spend: to omit: to disregard: to surpass: to enact, or to be enacted by: to cause to move: to send: to transfer: to give forth: to cause to go from one person or state to another: to approve: to undergo successfully: to give circulation to: (fencing) to thrust:—pa.p. passed and past.—n. a way through which one passes: a narrow passage, esp. over or through a range of mountains: a narrow defile: a passport: state or condition: a written permission to go out or in anywhere: a ticket: (fencing) a thrust: success in any examination or other test, a certificate of having reached a certain standard—without honours.—adj. Pass′able, that may be passed, travelled over, or navigated: that may bear inspection: that may be accepted or allowed to pass: a little above the common: tolerable.—n. Pass′ableness.—adv. Pass′ably.—ns. Pass′book, a book that passes between a trader and his customer, in which credit purchases are entered: a bank-book; Pass′-check, a ticket of admission to a place, or of readmission when one goes out intending to return; Pass′er, one who passes; Pass′er-by, one who passes by or near; Pass′key, a key enabling one to enter a house: a key for opening several locks.—adj. Pass′less, having no pass: impassable.—ns. Pass′man, one who gains a degree or pass without honours at a university; Pass′port, a warrant of protection and permission to travel; Pass′word (mil.), a private word by which a friend is distinguishable from a stranger, enabling one to pass or enter a camp, &c.—Pass muster, to go through an inspection without fault being found; Pass off, to impose fraudulently, to palm off; Pass on, to go forward: to proceed; Pass on, or upon, to come upon, to happen to: to give judgment or sentence upon: to practise artfully, to impose upon, to palm off; Pass over, or by, to go to the other side of: to cross, to go past without visiting or halting: to overlook, to disregard; Pass the time of day, to exchange any ordinary greeting of civility; Pass through, to undergo, experience.—Bring to pass, to cause to happen; Come to pass, to happen. [O. Fr. passer—It. passarepassus, a step.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Off

Off

of, adv. from: away from: on the opposite side of a question.—adj. most distant: on the opposite or farther side: on the side of a cricket-field right of the wicket-keeper and left of the bowler: not devoted to usual business, as an Off day.—prep. not on.—interj. away! depart!—adj. and adv. Off′-and-on′, occasional.—adj. Off′-col′our, of inferior value: indisposed.—n. Off′-come (Scot.), an apology, pretext: any exhibition of temper, &c.—adv. Off′-hand, at once: without hesitating.—adj. without study: impromptu: free and easy.—adj. Off′ish, reserved in manner.—ns. Off′-print, a reprint of a single article from a magazine or other periodical—the French tirage à part, German Abdruck; Off′-reck′oning, an allowance formerly made to certain British officers from the money appropriated for army clothing.—v.t. Off′saddle, to unsaddle.—ns. Off′scouring, matter scoured off: refuse: anything vile or despised; Off′-scum, refuse or scum; Off′set (in accounts), a sum or value set off against another as an equivalent: a short lateral shoot or bulb: a terrace on a hillside: (archit.) a horizontal ledge on the face of a wall: in surveying, a perpendicular from the main line to an outlying point.—v.t. (in accounts) to place against as an equivalent.—n. Off′shoot, that which shoots off from the main stem, stream, &c.: anything growing out of another.—adv. Off′shore, in a direction from the shore, as a wind: at a distance from the shore.—adj. from the shore.—ns. Off′side, the right-hand side in driving: the farther side; Off′spring, that which springs from another: a child, or children: issue: production of any kind.—Off one's chump, head, demented; Off one's feed, indisposed to eat.—Be off, to go away quickly; Come off, Go off, Show off, Take off, &c. (see Come, Go, Show, Take, &c.); Ill off, poor or unfortunate; Tell off, to count: to assign, as for a special duty; Well off, rich, well provided. [Same as Of.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Grade

Grade

grād, n. a degree or step in rank or dignity: the degree of slope on a road as compared with the horizontal: a class of animals produced by crossing a common breed with one purer—also adj.: a group of animals branching off from a common stem.—v.t. Grā′date, to cause to blend gradually from one tint of colour to another.—v.i. to effect gradation.—adv. Gradā′tim, gradually.—n. Gradā′tion, a rising step by step: progress from one degree or state to another: position attained: state of being arranged in ranks: (mus.) a diatonic succession of chords: (paint.) the gradual blending of tints.—adjs. Gradā′tional; Gradā′tioned, formed by gradations or stages; Grad′atory, proceeding step by step, adapted for walking or forward movement; Grā′dient, gradually rising: rising with a regular slope.—n. the degree of slope on a road or railway: the difference in the height of the barometer between one place and another place at some distance: an incline.—ns. Grād′ienter, a surveyor's instrument for determining grades; Grād′in, Gradine′, one of a series of rising seats, as in an amphitheatre: a raised step or ledge behind an altar; Gradin′o, a decoration for the gradin.—adj. Grad′ūal, advancing by grades or degrees: regular and slow.—n. in the Roman Church, the portion of the mass between the epistle and the gospel, formerly always sung from the steps of the altar: the book containing such anthems—also Grail.—ns. Grad′ūalism, Gradūal′ity.—adv. Grad′ūally.—v.t. Grad′ūāte, to divide into regular intervals: to mark with degrees: to proportion.—v.i. to pass by grades or degrees: to pass through a university course and receive a degree.—n. one admitted to a degree in a college, university, or society.—p.adj. Grad′ūāted, marked with degrees, as a thermometer.—ns. Grad′uateship; Gradūā′tion; Grad′ūātor, a mathematical instrument for graduating or dividing lines into regular intervals; Graduc′tion (astron.), the division of circular arcs into degrees, minutes, &c.; Grā′dus, a dictionary of Greek or Latin prosody—contraction of gradus ad Parnassum, a step or stair to Parnassus, the abode of the Muses.—Down, and Up, grade, a descending or ascending part, as of a road. [Fr.,—L. gradus, a step—gradi, to step.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Passion

Passion

pash′un, n. power of feeling pain or suffering: strong feeling or agitation of mind, esp. rage: ardent love: eager desire: state of the soul when receiving an impression: suffering or passive condition, as opposed to Action: the sufferings, esp. the death, of Christ: (pl.) excited conditions of mind.—ns. Passiflō′ra, a genus of climbing herbs or shrubs, the passion-flowers; Pass′ional, Pass′ionary, a book containing accounts of the sufferings of saints and martyrs.—adjs. Pass′ional, influenced by passion; Pass′ionate, moved by passion: showing strong and warm feeling: easily moved to anger: intense.—adv. Pass′ionately.—n. Pass′ionateness.—adj. Pass′ioned, moved by passion: expressing passion.—ns. Pass′ion-flow′er, a flower so called from a fancied resemblance to a crown of thorns, the emblem of Christ's passion; Pass′ionist (R.C.), one of a religious congregation devoted to the commemoration of the Passion of Christ by missions, &c.—adj. Pass′ionless, free from passion: not easily excited to anger.—n. Pass′ion-mū′sic, music to which words describing the sufferings and death of Christ are set.—adj. Pass′ion-pale (Tenn.), pale with passion.—ns. Pass′ion-play, a religious drama representing the sufferings and death of Christ; Pass′ion-Sun′day, the fifth Sunday in Lent; Pass′ion-week, name commonly given in England to Holy-week (as being the week of Christ's passion); but, according to proper rubrical usage, the week preceding Holy-week. [Fr.,—L. passio, passionispassus, pa.p. of pati, to suffer.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Roll-off

Roll-off

Roll-off is the steepness of a transmission function with frequency, particularly in electrical network analysis, and most especially in connection with filter circuits in the transition between a passband and a stopband. It is most typically applied to the insertion loss of the network, but can, in principle, be applied to any relevant function of frequency, and any technology, not just electronics. It is usual to measure roll-off as a function of logarithmic frequency, consequently, the units of roll-off are either decibels per decade (dB/decade), where a decade is a 10-times increase in frequency, or decibels per octave (dB/8ve), where an octave is 2-times increase in frequency. The concept of roll-off stems from the fact that in many networks roll-off tends towards a constant gradient at frequencies well away from the cut-off point of the frequency curve. Roll-off enables the cut-off performance of such a filter network to be reduced to a single number. Note that roll-off can occur with decreasing frequency as well as increasing frequency, depending on the bandform of the filter being considered: for instance a low-pass filter will roll-off with increasing frequency, but a high-pass filter or the lower stopband of a band-pass filter will roll-off with decreasing frequency. For brevity, this article describes only low-pass filters. This is to be taken in the spirit of prototype filters; the same principles may be applied to high-pass filters by interchanging phrases such as "above cut-off frequency" and "below cut-off frequency".

— Wikipedia

CREPT

CREPT

"past tense and past participle of CREEP,to move along with the body prone and close to the ground; to move slowly on hands and knees,to go very slowly,to go timidly or cautiously so as to escape notice, to enter or advance gradually so as to be almost unnoticed,to have the sensation of being covered with creeping things, to slip or gradually shift position, to change shape permanently from prolonged stress or exposure to high temperatures;to crawl with the body near to or touching the ground,crawl,worm,wriggle,squirm,slither,writhe,drag yourself,edge,inch,crawl on all fours;encroach, inch;bastard, beast, bleeder,blighter , boor, bounder, bugger, buzzard, cad, chuff, churl, clown, cretin, crud,crumb,cur, dirtbag,dog, fink, heel, hound, jerk, joker, louse, lout, pill, rat, rat fink, reptile, rotter, schmuck,scum, scumbag,scuzzball,skunk, sleaze, sleazebag,sleazeball,slime, slimeball,slob, snake, so-and-so, sod [chiefly British], stinkard, stinker, swine, toad, varmint, vermin,snail,molasses,(as) slow as molasses idiomat a snail's pace idiom,away bit build by by and by idiom,by degrees idiom,claw ,claw your way (somewhere) idiom,clunky,cool,course,crawl,crawler,creep,creeping,dally,dawdle,degree,deliberately,dribs,drift,drop,drop behind,ease,edge,float,gently,gently does it! idiom,gradual,gradually,hanghang around,in ones and twos idiom,inch inch by inch idiom,infiltrate,infiltration,jog,Labour,lag,laggard,laggy,lingeringly,little,loiter,mill,mill around,nose,nudge,poky,pootle,prowl,rolling,Rome wasn't built in a day idiom,sedately,sidle,slack,slow burn,slowcoach,slowdown,slowly,slowness,slowpoke,sluggish,sluggishly,sluggishness,steadily,steadiness,steady,stepwise,straggle,straggler,struggle,subsonic,take your time idiom,tootle,trail,trickle,trundle,unhurried,wander,wend.

— Editors Contribution

Saucer pass

Saucer pass

The saucer pass is an ice hockey term, which means passing the puck to another player such that it flies in the air like a flying saucer. This makes the pass very difficult to intercept by opposing players but it will still land flat on the ice making it simple to control for the receiving player. The saucer pass is widely used nowadays due to the difficulty of intercepting it. It requires a high degree of hockey skill to perform a saucer pass to a team member while also making it difficult for an opposing player to intercept it. The typical height used for a saucer pass depends on the number of opposing players surrounding the player initiating the pass. If the pass is in front of the goal within a few meters, it usually raises a maximum of 30 centimeters above the ice level. In the case of "a torpedo attack"—a saucer pass covering tens of meters, often starting from the passer's defensive zone—the pass can easily rise over 3 meters from the ice to avoid it being captured by an opposing player's glove. The inventor of the saucer pass is commonly considered as the Finnish ice hockey legend, Raimo Helminen. According to the book "Raipe - Vaatimattomuuden lyhyt oppimäärä", he invented the pass when he was playing against grown-up men from his neighborhood when he was young child in Koivistonkylä, Tampere, Finland.

— Freebase

Low-pass filter

Low-pass filter

A low-pass filter is a filter that passes low-frequency signals and attenuates signals with frequencies higher than the cutoff frequency. The actual amount of attenuation for each frequency varies depending on specific filter design. It is sometimes called a high-cut filter, or treble cut filter in audio applications. A low-pass filter is the opposite of a high-pass filter. A band-pass filter is a combination of a low-pass and a high-pass. Low-pass filters exist in many different forms, including electronic circuits, anti-aliasing filters for conditioning signals prior to analog-to-digital conversion, digital filters for smoothing sets of data, acoustic barriers, blurring of images, and so on. The moving average operation used in fields such as finance is a particular kind of low-pass filter, and can be analyzed with the same signal processing techniques as are used for other low-pass filters. Low-pass filters provide a smoother form of a signal, removing the short-term fluctuations, and leaving the longer-term trend. An optical filter can correctly be called a low-pass filter, but conventionally is called a longpass filter, to avoid confusion.

— Freebase

Cut

Cut

kut, v.t. to make an incision in: to cleave or pass through: to divide: to carve, hew, or fashion by cutting: to wound or hurt: to affect deeply: to shorten: to break off acquaintance with, to pass intentionally without saluting: to renounce, give up: to castrate: to perform or execute, as 'to cut a caper.'—v.i. to make an incision: to pass, go quickly: (slang) to run away, to be off: to twiddle the feet rapidly in dancing:—pr.p. cut′ting; pa.t. and pa.p. cut.—n. a cleaving or dividing: a stroke or blow: an act of unkindness: the card obtained by cutting or dividing the pack: an incision or wound: a piece cut off: an engraved block, or the picture from it: manner of cutting, or, fashion: (pl.) a lot.—n. Cut′away′, a coat with the skirt cut away in a curve in front—also adj.ns. Cut′-off, that which cuts off or shortens, a straighter road, a shorter channel cut by a river across a bend: a contrivance for saving steam by regulating its admission to the cylinder; Cut′purse (Shak.), one who stole by Cutter. cutting off and carrying away purses (the purses being worn at the girdle): a pickpocket; Cut′ter, the person or thing that cuts: in a tailor's shop, the one who measures and cuts out the cloth: a small vessel with one mast, a mainsail, a forestaysail, and a jib set to bowsprit-end, any sloop of narrow beam and deep draught; Cut′-throat, an assassin: ruffian; Cut′ting, a dividing or lopping off: an incision: a piece cut off: a paragraph from a newspaper: a piece of road or railway excavated: a twig; Cut′-wa′ter, the fore-part of a ship's prow.—Cut a dash, or figure, to make a conspicuous appearance; Cut-and-come-again, abundant supply, from the notion of cutting a slice, and returning at will for another; Cut-and-cover, a method of forming a tunnel by cutting out, arching it over, and then covering in; Cut-and-dry, or Cut-and-dried, ready made, without the merit of freshness—from the state of herbs in the shop instead of the field; Cut and run, to be off quickly; Cut down, to take down the body of one hanged by cutting the rope: to reduce, curtail; Cut in, to strike into, as to a conversation, a game at whist; Cut it too fat, to overdo a thing; Cut off, to destroy, put to an untimely death: intercept: stop; Cut off with a shilling, to disinherit, bequeathing only a shilling; Cut one's stick, to take one's departure; Cut out, to shape: contrive: debar: supplant: to take a ship out of a harbour, &c., by getting between her and the shore; Cut short, to abridge: check; Cut the coat according to the cloth, to adapt one's self to circumstances; Cut the teeth, to have the teeth grow through the gums—of an infant; Cut the throat of (fig.), to destroy utterly; Cut up, to carve: eradicate: criticise severely: turn out (well or ill) when divided into parts; Cut up rough, to become quarrelsome.—A cut above (coll.), a degree or stage above; Short cut, or Near cut, a short way. [Prob. W. cwtau, shorten.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Yumen Pass

Yumen Pass

Yumen Pass, or Jade Gate or Pass of the Jade Gate, is the name of a pass located west of Dunhuang in today's Gansu Province of China. In ancient times, this was a pass through which the Silk Road passed, and was the one road connecting Central Asia and China, the former called the Western Regions. Just to the south was the Yangguan pass, which was also an important point on the Silk Road. Although Chinese guan is usually translated simply as "pass", its more specific meaning is a "frontier pass" to distinguish it from an ordinary pass through the mountains. Yumen guan and Yang guan 玉門陽關 are derived from: yu 玉 = 'jade' + men = 'gate', 'door'; and Yang 陽 = 'sunny side', 'south side of a hill', 'north side of a river,' and guan 關 = ‘frontier-passes’. These were the two most famous passes leading to the north and west from Chinese territory. During the Early Han, "... a defensive line was established from Jiuquan in the Gansu Corridor west to the Jade Gate Pass at its end." Not to be confused with the city Yumen in Gansu, China. Although both are within the same Jiuquan "prefecture-level city" of Gansu province, Yumen Pass is located some 400 km to the west of its namesake city.

— Freebase

Forward pass

Forward pass

In several forms of football a forward pass is a throwing of the ball in the direction that the offensive team is trying to move, towards the defensive team's goal line. The forward pass is one of main distinguishers between gridiron football in which the play is legal and widespread, and rugby football from which the North American games evolved, in which the play is illegal. In some football codes, such as association football, the kicked forward pass is used so ubiquitously that it is not thought of as a distinct kind of play at all. In these sports, the concept of offside is used to regulate who can be in front of the play or be nearest to the goal. However, this has not always been the case. Some earlier incarnations of football allowed unlimited forward passing, while others had strict offside rules similar to rugby. The development of the forward pass in American football shows how the game has evolved from its rugby roots into the distinctive game it is today. Illegal and experimental forward passes had been attempted as early as 1876, but the first legal forward pass in American football took place in 1906, after a change in rules. Another change in rules occurred on January 18, 1951, which established that no center, tackle, or guard could receive a forward pass. Today, the only linemen who can receive a forward pass are the ends. Current rules regulate who may throw and who may receive a forward pass, and under what circumstances, as well as how the defensive team may try to prevent a pass from being completed. The primary pass thrower is the quarterback, and statistical analysis is used to determine a quarterback's success rate at passing in various situations, as well as a team's overall success at the "passing game."

— Freebase

Pass interference

Pass interference

In American and Canadian gridiron football, pass interference is a penalty that occurs when a player interferes with an eligible receiver's ability to make a fair attempt to catch a forward pass. Pass interference may include tripping, pushing, pulling, or cutting in front of the receiver or pulling on the receiver's arms. It does not include catching or batting the ball before it reaches the receiver. Once the ball touches any defensive player or eligible offensive receiver the above rules no longer apply and the defender may tackle the receiver or attempt to prevent him from gaining control of the ball. Once a forward pass is in the air it is a loose ball and thus any eligible receiver – all defensive players are eligible receivers – may try to catch it. When a defensive player catches a forward pass it is an interception and his team gains possession of the ball. Some actions that are defined as pass interference may be overlooked if the defender is attempting to catch or bat the ball rather than focusing on the receiver. The intended receiver may find himself a defender if a defensive player has a better chance to catch a forward pass. If an offensive player commits pass interference against a defensive player attempting to intercept a forward pass it is offensive pass interference.

— Freebase

short pass

short pass

A pass of the ball between teammates too close together to allow an opponent to get between them. There is no particular distance the ball must travel to qualify as a short pass. For instance, if the passing player drops the ball and retreats before her teammate takes possession, it is not a short pass. A short pass is against the rules and results in a penalty pass to the opposition.

— Wiktionary

Atmospheric temperature range

Atmospheric temperature range

Atmospheric temperature range is the numerical difference between the minimum and maximum values of temperature observed in a given location. A temperature range may refer to a period of time or to an average. The variation in temperature that occurs from the highs of the day to the cool of nights is called diurnal temperature variation. The size of ground-level atmospheric temperature ranges depends on several factors, such as: ⁕The average temperature ⁕The average humidity ⁕The regime of winds ⁕The proximity to large bodies of water, such as the sea A location which combines an average temperature of 19 degrees Celsius, 60% average humidity and a temperature range of about 10 degrees Celsius around the average temperature is considered ideal in terms of comfort for the human species. Most of the places with these characteristics are located in the transition between temperate and tropical climates, approximately around the tropics, particularly in the Southern hemisphere. The figure at left shows an example of monthly temperatures recorded at one of such locations, the city of Campinas, state of São Paulo, Brazil, which lies approximately 60 km north of the Capricorn line. Average yearly temperature is 22.4 degrees Celsius, ranging from an average minimum of 12.2 degrees to a maximum of 29.9 degrees. The average temperature range is 11.4 degrees. Variability along the year is small. One can easily see in the graph another typical phenomenon of temperature ranges, which is its increase during winter. In Campinas, for example, the daily temperature range in July may vary between typically 10 and 24 degrees Celsius, while in January, it may range between 20 and 30 degrees Celsius.

— Freebase

Degree

Degree

de-grē′, n. a grade or step: one of a series of advances: relative position: rank: extent: a mark of distinction conferred by universities, whether earned by examination or granted as a mark of honour: the 360th part of a circle: 60 geographical miles: nearness of relationship: comparative amount of guilt: one of the three stages (positive, comparative, superlative) in the comparison of an adjective or an adverb.—By degrees, by little and little, gradually; Forbidden degrees, the degrees of consanguinity and affinity within which it is not permitted to marry; Songs of degrees, or Songs of ascents, Psalms cxx.-cxxxiv., either because sung by the Jews returning from captivity, or by the Jews coming up annually to attend the feasts at Jerusalem; To a degree, to a great degree, to an extreme. [Fr. degré—L. de, gradus, a step.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. combine
  • B. defuse
  • C. aggregate
  • D. merge