Synonyms containing penal retribution

We've found 279 synonyms:

Penal

Penal

Peneral is a town in south Trinidad and Tobago. It lies south of San Fernando and Debe, and north of Siparia. It was originally a rice and cocoa producing area but is now a rapidly expanding and developing town. The population is 12,281. The heart of Penal contains many businesses while the outskirts focus on agricultural development. Penal has a police station, branches of three banks health facilities, photo studios, fast food restaurants, service stations and clothing stores. Penal plays a major role in the energy supply to the nation's populace. Petrotrin, the national oil company, has a major sub-unit in Clarke Road and the National Gas Company has gas lines running through Penal that links the gas fields of the South East Coast and the industrial estates. One of the countries three major power generating plants owned by Powergen Ltd is located at Syne Village to the west of Penal. The area is known for the High Schools located in the Penal-Debe area. It is one of the areas in Trinidad that has the most schools. Penal is also known for the Doubles, Roti and Aloo-Pies, which are always packed with customers for delicious cuisine.

— Freebase

Criminal code

Criminal code

A criminal code (or penal code) is a document which compiles all, or a significant amount of, a particular jurisdiction's criminal law. Typically a criminal code will contain offences which are recognised in the jurisdiction, penalties which might be imposed for these offences and some general provisions (such as definitions and prohibitions on retroactive prosecution).Criminal codes are relatively common in civil law jurisdictions, which tend to build legal systems around codes and principles which are relatively abstract and apply them on a case by case basis. Conversely they are not as common in common law jurisdictions. The proposed introduction of a criminal code in England and Wales was a significant project of the Law Commission from 1968 to 2008. Due to the strong tradition of legal precedent in the jurisdiction and consequently the large number of binding legal judgements and ambiguous 'common law offences', as well as the often inconsistent nature of English law, the creation of a satisfactory code became very difficult. The project was officially abandoned in 2008 although as of 2009 it has been revived.A statutory Criminal Law Codification Advisory Committee for Irish criminal law met from 2007 to 2010 and its Draft Criminal Code and Commentary was published in 2011.In the United States, a Model Penal Code exists which is not itself law but which provides the basis for the criminal law of many states. Individual states often choose to make use of criminal codes which are often based, to a varying extent on the model code. Title 18 of the United States Code is the criminal code for federal crimes. However, Title 18 does not contain many of the general provisions concerning criminal law that are found in the criminal codes of many so-called "civil law" countries. Criminal codes are generally supported for their introduction of consistency to legal systems and for making the criminal law more accessible to laypeople. A code may help avoid a chilling effect where legislation and case law appears to be either inaccessible or beyond comprehension to non-lawyers. Alternatively critics have argued that codes are too rigid and that they fail to provide enough flexibility for the law to be effective. The term "penal code" (code pénal) derives from the French Penal Code of 1791.

— Wikipedia

Penal colony

Penal colony

A penal colony is a settlement used to exile prisoners and separate them from the general populace by placing them in a remote location, often an island or distant colonial territory. Although the term can be used to refer to a correctional facility located in a remote location it is more commonly used to refer to communities of prisoners overseen by wardens or governors having absolute authority. Historically penal colonies have often been used for penal labour in an economically underdeveloped part of a state's territories, and on a far larger scale than a prison farm. In practice such penal colonies may be little more than slave communities. The British, French, and other colonial empires heavily used North America and other parts of the world as penal colonies to varying degrees, sometimes under the guise of indentured servitude or similar arrangements.

— Freebase

Retributory

Retributory

of or pertaining to retribution; of the nature of retribution; involving retribution or repayment; as, retributive justice; retributory comforts

— Webster Dictionary

Prison farm

Prison farm

A prison farm or work camp is a large correctional facility where penal labor convicts are put to economical use in a 'farm', usually for manual labour, largely in open air, such as in agriculture, logging, quarrying, etc. Its historical equivalent on a very large scale was called a penal colony. The agricultural goods produced by prison farms are generally used primarily to feed the prisoners themselves and other wards of the state, and secondarily, to be sold for whatever profit the state may be able to obtain. In addition to being forced to labor directly for the government on a prison farm or in a penal colony, inmates may be forced to do farm work for private enterprises by being farmed out through the practice of convict leasing to work on private agricultural lands or related industries. The party purchasing their labor from the government generally does so at a steep discount from the cost of free labor. Depending on the prevailing doctrine on judicial punishment and penal harm, psychological and/or physical cruelty may be a conscious intent of prison farm labor, and not just an inevitable but unintended collateral effect.

— Freebase

Venge

Venge

venj, v.t. (Shak.) to avenge, to punish.—adj. Venge′able (Spens.), revengeful: deserving to be revenged.—n. Venge′ance, the infliction of punishment upon another in return for an injury or offence: retribution: (Shak.) harm, mischief.—adv. (Shak.) extremely, exceedingly.—adj. Venge′ful, vindictive, retributive: revengeful.—adv. Venge′fully.—ns. Venge′fulness; Venge′ment (Spens.), vengeance, penal retribution; Ven′ger (Spens.), an avenger.—With a vengeance (coll.), violently: exceedingly. [O. Fr. venger—L. vindicāre.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Penal

Penal

pē′nal, adj. pertaining to, incurring, or constituting punishment: used for punishment.—v.t. Pē′nalise, to lay under penalty.—adv. Pē′nally.—Penal laws, laws prohibiting certain actions under penalties; Penal servitude, hard labour in a prison as a punishment for crime—introduced in England in 1853 instead of transportation; Penal statute, a statute imposing a penalty or punishment for crime. [Fr.,—L. pœnalispœna, Gr. poinē, punishment.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

burglary

burglary

Under the Model Penal Code, entering a building or occupied structure with purpose to commit a crime therein, unless the premises are at the time open to the public or the actor is licensed or privileged to enter. Model Penal Code u00A7 221.1.

— Wiktionary

Debe

Debe

Debe is a town in south Trinidad located north of Penal and south of San Fernando. As the town of Debe has grown it has merged to some extent with Penal. Debe is an important town in the wholesale marketing of agricultural produce, and was formerly important in sugar cane production. Debe is also widely known for doubles and other Indian delicacies. It also has the largest wholesale market in the country. Debe is a tiny part of India which settled here many years ago, it brings tradition and culture to the fore front of society.It is an exotic blend of east meets west. Debe is administered by the Penal-Debe Regional Corporation.

— Freebase

Penalty

Penalty

penal retribution; punishment for crime or offense; the suffering in person or property which is annexed by law or judicial decision to the commission of a crime, offense, or trespass

— Webster Dictionary

Vengement

Vengement

avengement; penal retribution; vengeance

— Webster Dictionary

Penal

Penal

enacting or threatening punishment; as, a penal statue; the penal code

— Webster Dictionary

Punishment

Punishment

Punishment is the authoritative imposition of something undesirable or unpleasant on, or the removal of something desirable or pleasant from, a person, animal, organization or entity in response to behavior deemed unacceptable by an individual, group or other entity. The authority may be either a group or a single person, and punishment may be carried out formally under a system of law or informally in other kinds of social settings such as within a family. Negative consequences that are not authorized or that are administered without a breach of rules are not considered to be punishment as defined here. The study and practice of the punishment of crimes, particularly as it applies to imprisonment, is called penology, or, often in modern texts, corrections; in this context, the punishment process is euphemistically called "correctional process". Research into punishment often includes similar research into prevention. Fundamental justifications for punishment include: retribution, deterrence, rehabilitation, and incapacitations such as isolation in order to prevent the wrongdoer's having contact with potential victims. Of the four justifications, only retribution is part of the definition of punishment and none of the other justifications is a guaranteed outcome.

— Freebase

Gabâ

Gabâ

Gabâ or gabaa, for the people in many parts of the Philippines, is the concept of a non-human and non-divine, imminent retribution. A sort of negative karma, it is generally seen as an evil effect on a person because of their wrongdoings or transgressions. The word has later been recycled for translating "divine retribution" or "divine fury" in the translations of the Bible to many local dialects in the Philippines. It is also translated as nemesis.

— Freebase

Retributive justice

Retributive justice

Retributive justice is a theory of justice that considers punishment, if proportionate, to be the best response to crime. When an offender breaks the law, s/he thereby forfeits or suspends her/his right to something of equal value, and justice requires that this forfeit be enacted. Retribution should be distinguished from vengeance. Unlike revenge, retribution is directed only at wrongs, has inherent limits, is not personal, involves no pleasure at the suffering of others, and employs procedural standards. In ethics and law, "Let the punishment fit the crime" is a principle aphorism that means the severity of penalty for a misdeed or wrongdoing should be reasonable and proportionate to the severity of the infraction. The concept is common to most cultures throughout the world and is evident in many ancient texts. Its presence in the ancient Jewish culture is shown by its inclusion in the law of Moses, specifically in Deuteronomy 19:17-21, and Exodus 21:23-21:27, which includes the punishments of "life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot." That phrasing in turn resembles the older Code of Hammurabi. Many other documents reflect this value in the world's cultures. However, the judgment of whether a punishment is appropriately severe can vary greatly between cultures and individuals.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. refuse
  • B. decline
  • C. admit
  • D. reject