Synonyms containing pious fraud

We've found 703 synonyms:

Fraud

Fraud

frawd, n. deceit: imposture: (Milt.) a snare: a deceptive trick: (coll.) a cheat: a fraudulent production.—adj. Fraud′ful, deceptive.—adv. Fraud′fully.—ns. Fraud′ulence, Fraud′ulency.—adj. Fraud′ulent, using fraud: dishonest.—adv. Fraud′ulently.—Fraudulent bankruptcy, a bankruptcy in which the insolvent is accessory, by concealment or otherwise, to the diminution of the funds divisible among his creditors.—Pious fraud, a deception practised with a good end in view: (coll.) a religious humbug. [O. Fr.,—L. fraus, fraudis, fraud.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Financial crime

Financial crime

Financial crime is crime committed against property, involving the unlawful conversion of the ownership of property (belonging to one person) to one's own personal use and benefit. Financial crimes may involve fraud (cheque fraud, credit card fraud, mortgage fraud, medical fraud, corporate fraud, securities fraud (including insider trading), bank fraud, insurance fraud, market manipulation, payment (point of sale) fraud, health care fraud); theft; scams or confidence tricks; tax evasion; bribery; sedition; embezzlement; identity theft; money laundering; and forgery and counterfeiting, including the production of Counterfeit money and consumer goods. Financial crimes may involve additional criminal acts, such as computer crime, elder abuse, burglary, armed robbery, and even violent crime such as robbery or murder. Financial crimes may be carried out by individuals, corporations, or by organized crime groups. Victims may include individuals, corporations, governments, and entire economies.

— Wikipedia

Electoral fraud

Electoral fraud

Electoral fraud is illegal interference with the process of an election. Acts of fraud affect vote counts to bring about an election result, whether by increasing the vote share of the favored candidate, depressing the vote share of the rival candidates, or both. What electoral fraud is under law varies from country to country. Many kinds of election fraud are outlawed in electoral legislation, but others are in violation of general laws, such as those banning assault, harassment or libel. Although technically the term 'electoral fraud' covers only those acts which are illegal, the term is sometimes used to describe acts which are legal but nevertheless considered morally unacceptable, outside the spirit of electoral laws, or in violation of the principles of democracy. Show elections, in which only one candidate can win, are sometimes considered to be electoral fraud, although they may comply with the law. In national elections, successful electoral fraud can have the effect of a coup d'état or corruption of democracy. In a narrow election a small amount of fraud may be enough to change the result. Even if the outcome is not affected, fraud can still have a damaging effect if not punished, as it can reduce voters' confidence in democracy. Even the perception of fraud can be damaging as it makes people less inclined to accept election results. This can lead to the breakdown of democracy and the establishment of a dictatorship.

— Freebase

Identity fraud

Identity fraud

Identity fraud is the use by one person of another person's personal information, without authorization, to commit a crime or to deceive or defraud that other person or a third person. Most identity fraud is committed in the context of financial advantages, such as accessing a victim's credit card, bank or loan accounts. False or forged identity documents have been used in criminal activity (such as to gain access to security areas) or in dealings with government agencies, such as immigration. Often today, the identities of real persons are used in the preparation of these false documents. A person's personal information may be surreptitiously obtained, commonly described as identity theft, in a variety of ways. A fraudster may use another person's basic personal details (such as name, address, username, and PIN) to access the victim's online accounts, including banking accounts, email, and social media accounts. Such access may be for the purpose of obtaining further personal information on the target. More seriously, the information may then be used in truly fraudulent activities, such as opening a credit card account in the victim's name and then charging purchases to that account, or the entering into a loan agreement in the victim's name. Identity fraud may be committed without identity theft, as in the case of the fraudster being given someone's personal information for other reasons but uses it to commit fraud, or when the person whose identity is being used is colluding with the person committing the fraud. There have been numerous cases of organisations being hacked to obtain personal information. One case of identity theft was the 2011 hacking of the PlayStation Network, when personal and credit card information of 77 million accounts were stolen. The unauthorized use of a stolen credit card is commonly not considered identity fraud, but may be considered consumer fraud. The use of fake names, ID cards, falsified or forged documents, and lying about his or her own age to simply "hide" his or her true identity is sometimes also regarded as identity fraud. Reasons for this type of identity fraud may include wanting to purchase tobacco or alcohol as a minor as well as to continue playing on a certain sports team or organization when that person is really too old to compete.

— Wikipedia

Intrinsic fraud

Intrinsic fraud

Intrinsic fraud is an intentionally false representation that goes to the heart of what a given lawsuit is about, in other words, whether fraud was used to procure the transaction. Intrinsic fraud is distinguished from extrinsic fraud which is a deceptive means of keeping a person from discovering and/or enforcing legal rights. It is possible to have either intrinsic or extrinsic frauds, or both. During a trial, perjury, forgery, and bribery of a witness constitute frauds that might have been relieved by the court. Such actions will usually lead to a mistrial being declared and after any penalties for the involved parties a new trial will take place on the same matter. Two types of intrinsic fraud in contract law are fraud in the inducement and fraud in the factum. Fraud in the factum is a legal defense, and occurs where A signs a contract, but either does not realize that it is a contract or does not understand the nature of the contract, because of some false information that B gave to A. For example, if John tells his mother that he is taking a college course on handwriting analysis, and for his homework, he needs her to read and sign a pretend deed. If Mom signs the deed believing what he told her, and John tries to enforce the deed, Mom can plead "fraud in the factum."

— Freebase

Mortgage fraud

Mortgage fraud

Mortgage fraud is a crime in which the intent is to materially misrepresent or omit information on a mortgage loan application to obtain a loan or to obtain a larger loan than would have been obtained had the lender or borrower known the truth. In United States federal courts, mortgage fraud is prosecuted as wire fraud, bank fraud, mail fraud and money laundering, with penalties of up to thirty years imprisonment. As the incidence of mortgage fraud has risen over the past few years, states have also begun to enact their own penalties for mortgage fraud. Mortgage fraud is not to be confused with predatory mortgage lending, which occurs when a consumer is misled or deceived by agents of the lender. However, predatory lending practices often co-exist with mortgage fraud.

— Freebase

Phone fraud

Phone fraud

Phone fraud, or more generally communications fraud, is the use of telecommunications products or services with the intention of illegally acquiring money from, or failing to pay, a telecommunication company or its customers. Many operators have increased measures to minimize fraud and reduce their losses. Communications operators tend to keep their actual loss figures and plans for corrective measures confidential.According to a 2011 survey by CFCA, an industry group created to reduce fraud against carriers, the five top fraud loss categories reported by operators were: US$4.96 Billion – Compromised PBX/Voicemail Systems $4.32 Billion – Subscription/Identity Theft $3.84 Billion – International Revenue Share Fraud $2.88 Billion – By-pass Fraud $2.40 Billion – Credit Card Fraud

— Wikipedia

Fraud in the factum

Fraud in the factum

Fraud in the Factum is a type of fraud where misrepresentation causes one to enter a transaction without accurately realizing the risks, duties, or obligations incurred. This can be when the maker or drawer of a negotiable instrument, such as a promissory note or check, is induced to sign the instrument without a reasonable opportunity to learn of its fraudulent character or essential terms. Determination of whether an act constitutes fraud in the factum depends upon consideration of “all relevant factors.” Fraud in the factum usually voids the instrument under state law and is a real defense against even an holder in due course. Contrast this with the situation where a trusted employee signs a check without permission. The employer must still honor the check despite the fact that the check was a fraudulent negotiable instrument. Here, the employer had a reasonable opportunity to avoid the obligation by restricting access to the checks. Fraud in the factum is often contrasted with fraud in the inducement. ⁕Fraud in the factum is a legal defense, and occurs where A makes/signs an agreement, but either does not realize that it is supposed to be a contract, or does not understand the nature/content of the agreement, because of some false information that B gave to A. For example, suppose John tells his mother that he is taking a college course on handwriting analysis, and for his homework he needs her to read and sign a pretend deed. If Mom signs the deed believing what he told her, and John tries to enforce the deed, Mom can plead "fraud in the factum."

— Freebase

Fraud Squad

Fraud Squad

A Fraud Squad is a police department which investigates fraud and other economic crimes. The largest Fraud Squad in the United Kingdom is run by the City of London Police who are responsible for policing London's and the UK's main financial hub. This department investigates what could be described as the "traditional" fraud offences, such as banking frauds; insurance frauds; investment frauds; insider dealing frauds; advance fee frauds and Internet frauds, amongst others. Each team is headed by a Detective Inspector who take it in turn on a weekly basis to act as the "Duty Squad" and they form the immediate response to any calls received concerning new fraud cases. The Fraud squad is a specialist area where officers are normally transferred from general detective duties with the Criminal Investigations Department. Some officers will nominated to work on specific cases for the Serious Fraud Office, they will also provide assistance and advice on policing matters to the SFO and Financial Services Authority. The City of London Police has recruited accountancy specialists directly into its Special Constabulary, and these officers primary duties are assisting in complex fraud investigations.

— Freebase

Credit card fraud

Credit card fraud

Credit card fraud is a wide-ranging term for theft and fraud committed using a credit card or any similar payment mechanism as a fraudulent source of funds in a transaction. The purpose may be to obtain goods without paying, or to obtain unauthorized funds from an account. Credit card fraud is also an adjunct to identity theft. According to the United States Federal Trade Commission, while identity theft had been holding steady for the last few years, it saw a 21 percent increase in 2008. However, credit card fraud, that crime which most people associate with ID theft, decreased as a percentage of all ID theft complaints for the sixth year in a row. Although incidence of credit card fraud is limited to about 0.1% of all card transactions, this has resulted in huge financial losses as the fraudulent transactions have been large value transactions. In 1999, out of 12 billion transactions made annually, approximately 10 million—or one out of every 1200 transactions—turned out to be fraudulent. Also, 0.04% of all monthly active accounts were fraudulent. Even with tremendous volume and value increase in credit card transactions since then, these proportions have stayed the same or have decreased due to sophisticated fraud detection and prevention systems. Today's fraud detection systems are designed to prevent one twelfth of one percent of all transactions processed which still translates into billions of dollars in losses.

— Freebase

Socure

Socure

Socure is an identity proofing company. Socure’s Social Biometrics(TM) solution adds a novel social twist to realtime identity verification and fraud detection to defend enterprises against identity fraud.The rise of social media and efforts to monetize consumer data through marketing and advertising has resulted in the easy availability of our personal information such as mother’s maiden name, favorite pet’s name, place of birth etc. on the Internet today. It’s no surprise then that identity fraud is now growing faster than world trade in some countries. In the US alone, $48 Billion was lost by financial institutions to identity fraud last year. In fact most tier-1 financial institutions are losing an average of over $100 Million per year per institution despite the fraud detection technologies implemented over the last decade. There are impacts to society beyond financial loss as a result of identity fraud. The problem is global.Socure Social Biometrics(TM) uses the power of social attestation – the process that goes on when we interact with our family, friends, peers and followers in unique ways – as a way to improve identity verification and identity fraud detection in realtime. Socure’s team of machine learning experts have created powerful patent pending algorithms and linked data processing techniques to extract this social attestation signal in realtime. This additive signal to existing fraud detection solutions reduces fraud losses, false positives and negatives as well as fraud-mitigation call center overhead; all of which impact an enterprise’s top and bottom line. Unlike other types of biometric solutions, Social Biometrics(TM) does not require any training or change of behavior on the consumer’s part. An enterprise can be social or traditional and still derive the benefits of our proven solution. Identity proofing drives everything in credit and commerce today and forms the under-pinnings of social-commerce around the world tomorrow.

— CrunchBase

Welfare fraud

Welfare fraud

Welfare fraud is the act of illegally using state welfare systems by knowingly withholding or giving information to obtain more funds than would otherwise be allocated. This article deals with welfare fraud in various countries of the world, and includes many social benefit programs such as food assistance, housing, unemployment benefits, Social Security, disability, and medical. Each country's problems and programs are varied. Obtaining reliable evidence of welfare fraud is notoriously difficult. Apart from the obvious methodological problems, research reveals that interviewing performance is often mediocre, and may be anecdotal, misunderstood, or collected from opinionated or biased caseworkers. Interviews with non-citizen welfare recipients, where the interviewer has succeeded in gaining a high level of trust, have shown that a very high percent fail to report incomes. Official figures of the prevalence of welfare fraud based on government investigation tend to be low – a few percent of the total amount of welfare spending. Statistical research indicates that the vast majority of fraud is committed by businesses serving the recipients of government benefits. Welfare or benefits fraud committed by recipients is usually of very modest sums, and is committed by people who struggle with poverty; but once started it often continues after reaching financial stability.

— Wikipedia

Pious fraud

Pious fraud

Pious fraud is used to describe fraud in religion or medicine. A pious fraud can be counterfeiting a miracle or falsely attributing a sacred text to a biblical figure due to the belief that the "end justifies the means", in this case the end of increasing faith by whatever means available.

— Freebase

Memento

Memento

Memento, Inc. designs and delivers enterprise fraud and compliance solutions for proactive monitoring, detection, real-time alerts, and investigation to credit unions and community banks in North America and Europe. It offers Security 4.0, an enterprise fraud and compliance platform that combines data management, fraud analytics, and case management capabilities to address technological issues, as well as enables banks or credit unions to address damaging fraud and compliance schemes. The company also provides solutions to monitor new account frauds across various channels, products, transaction types, and accounts; insider issue solutions to monitor transaction data, general ledger, and other data sources; and deposit account fraud solutions to protect deposit accounts. In addition, it offers enterprise fraud solutions for smaller banks or credit unions; Memento Security - Check Fraud, a check fraud prevention solution for banks; and solutions that address regulatory requirements, as well as enable organizations to detect, prevent, mitigate, and document identity theft and other issues to protect customers against identity theft. The company was founded in 2002 and is based in Concord, Massachusetts with additional offices in New York, Los Angeles, Milan, London, and Washington, D.C.

— CrunchBase

Fraud

Fraud

In criminal law, fraud is intentional deception made for personal gain or to damage another individual; the related adjective is fraudulent, and verb is defraud. Fraud is a crime and a civil law violation, though the specific criminal law definition varies by legal jurisdiction. Defrauding people or entities of money or valuables is a common purpose of fraud. A hoax also involves deception, but without the intention of gain or of damaging or depriving the victim. Fraud is a defense in a civil action for breach of contract or specific performance of a contract. Fraud is a basis for equitable jurisdiction.

— Freebase

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Quiz

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. adversary
  • B. opponent
  • C. protagonist
  • D. opposer