Synonyms containing pitch-ore

We've found 2,229 synonyms:

Pitch

Pitch

pich, n. the solid black shining substance obtained by boiling down common tar.—v.t. to smear with pitch.—adjs. Pitch′-black, Pitch′-dark, dark as pitch: very dark.—ns. Pitch′-blende, a black oxide of uranium; Pitch′-coal, a kind of bituminous coal: jet; Pitch′iness, state or quality of being pitchy; Pitch′-pine, a kind of pine which yields pitch, and is much used in America as fuel; Pitch′-plas′ter, a plaster of Burgundy or white pitch; Pitch′-stone, an old volcanic-like hardened pitch; Pitch′-tree, the kauri pine, the Amboyna pine, or the Norway spruce.—adj. Pitch′y, having the qualities of pitch: smeared with pitch: black like pitch: dark: dismal. [A.S. pic—L. pix, pic-is.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Absolute pitch

Absolute pitch

Absolute pitch, widely referred to as perfect pitch, is an auditory phenomenon characterized by the ability of a person to identify or re-create a given musical note without the benefit of a reference tone. AP can be demonstrated via linguistic labeling, auditory imagery, or sensorimotor responses. For example, an AP possessor can accurately reproduce a heard tone on their musical instrument without "hunting" for the correct pitch. Generally, absolute pitch implies some or all of the following abilities, achieved without a reference tone: ⁕Identify by name individual pitches played on various instruments. ⁕Name the key of a given piece of tonal music. ⁕Reproduce a piece of tonal music in the correct key days after hearing it. ⁕Identify and name all the tones of a given chord or other tonal mass. ⁕Accurately sing a named pitch. ⁕Name the pitches of common everyday sounds such as car horns and alarms. People may have absolute pitch along with the ability of relative pitch, and relative and absolute pitch work together in actual musical listening and practice, but strategies in using each skill vary. Those with absolute pitch may train their relative pitch, but there are no reported cases of an adult obtaining absolute pitch ability through musical training; adults who possess relative pitch, but who do not already have absolute pitch, can learn "pseudo-absolute pitch", and become able to identify notes in a way that superficially resembles absolute pitch. Moreover, training pseudo-absolute pitch requires considerable motivation, time, and effort, and learning is not retained without constant practice and reinforcement.

— Freebase

Pitch contour

Pitch contour

In linguistics, speech synthesis, and music, the pitch contour of a sound is a function or curve that tracks the perceived pitch of the sound over time. Pitch contour may include multiple sounds utilizing many pitches, and can relate to frequency function at one point in time to the frequency function at a later point. It is fundamental to the linguistic concept of tone, where the pitch or change in pitch of a speech unit over time affects the semantic meaning of a sound. It also indicates intonation in pitch accent languages. One of the primary challenges in speech synthesis technology, particularly for Western languages, is to create a natural-sounding pitch contour for the utterance as a whole. Unnatural pitch contours result in synthesis that sounds "lifeless" or "emotionless" to human listeners, a feature that has become a stereotype of speech synthesis in popular culture. In music, the pitch contour focuses on the relative change in pitch over time of a primary sequence of played notes. The same contour can be transposed without losing its essential relative qualities, such as sudden changes in pitch or a pitch that rises or falls over time. Pure tones have a clear pitch, but complex sounds such as speech and music typically have intense peaks at many different frequencies. Nevertheless, by establishing a fixed reference point in the frequency function of a complex sound, and then observing the movement of this reference point as the function translates, one can generate a meaningful pitch contour consistent with human experience.

— Freebase

Pitch

Pitch

pich, v.t. to thrust or fix in the ground: to fix or set in array: to fix the rate or price: to fling or throw: (mus.) to set the keynote of.—v.i. to settle, as something pitched: to come to rest from flight: to fall headlong: to fix the choice: to encamp: to rise and fall, as a ship.—n. a throw or cast from the hand: any point or degree of elevation or depression: degree: degree of slope: a descent: the height of a note in speaking or in music: (mech.) distance between the centres of two teeth in a wheel or a saw, or between the threads of a screw measured parallel to the axis.—ns. Pitched′-batt′le, a battle in which the contending parties have fixed positions: a battle previously arranged for on both sides; Pitch′er; Pitch′-far′thing, chuck-farthing; Pitch′fork, a fork for pitching hay, &c.: a tuning-fork.—v.t. to lift with a pitchfork: to throw suddenly into any position.—ns. Pitch′ing, the act of throwing: a facing of stone along a bank to protect against the action of water; Pitch′pipe, a small pipe to pitch the voice or tune with.—Pitch and pay (Shak.), pay down at once, pay ready-money; Pitch and toss, a game in which coins are thrown at a mark, the person who throws nearest having the right of tossing all the coins, and keeping those which come down head uppermost; Pitch in, to begin briskly; Pitch into, to assault. [A form of pick.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pitch class

Pitch class

In music, a pitch class is a set of all pitches that are a whole number of octaves apart, e.g., the pitch class C consists of the Cs in all octaves. "The pitch class C stands for all possible Cs, in whatever octave position." Thus, using scientific pitch notation, the pitch class "C" is the set although there is no formal limit to this sequence on either end, only a limited number of these pitches will actually be audible to the human ear. Pitch class is important because human pitch-perception is periodic: pitches belonging to the same pitch class are perceived as having a similar "quality" or "color", a property called octave equivalence. Psychologists refer to the quality of a pitch as its "chroma". A "chroma" is an attribute of pitches, just like hue is an attribute of color. A "pitch class" is a set of all pitches sharing the same chroma, just like "the set of all white things" is the collection of all white objects. Note that in standard Western equal temperament, distinct spellings can refer to the same sounding object: B♯3, C4, and D4 all refer to the same pitch, hence share the same chroma, and therefore belong to the same pitch class; a phenomenon called enharmonic equivalence.

— Freebase

Gangue

Gangue

In mining, gangue is the commercially worthless material that surrounds, or is closely mixed with, a wanted mineral in an ore deposit. It is thus distinct from overburden, which is the waste rock or materials overlying an ore or mineral body that are displaced during mining without being processed. The separation of mineral from gangue is known as mineral processing, mineral dressing or ore dressing and it is a necessary and often significant aspect of mining. It can be a complicated process, depending on the nature of the minerals involved. For example, galena, an ore of lead, is usually found in large pieces within its gangue, so it does not normally need extensive processing to remove it; but cassiterite, the chief ore of tin, is usually disseminated as very small crystals throughout its gangue, so when it is mined from hard rock, the ore-bearing rock first needs to be crushed very finely, and then has to be subjected to sophisticated processes to separate the ore. For any particular ore deposit, and at any particular point in time, the concentration of the wanted mineral in the gangue material will determine whether it is commercially viable to mine that deposit. The ease with which the ore can be separated also plays an important part. Early mining ventures, with their relatively unsophisticated methods, often could not achieve a high degree of separation, so significant quantities of minerals found their way into the tailings dumps of mines. As the value of a mineral increases, or when new and cheaper means of processing the ore are introduced it has often become worthwhile to rework such old dumps to retrieve the minerals they still contain.

— Freebase

Ore

Ore

An ore is a type of rock that contains minerals with important elements including metals. The ores are extracted through mining; these are then refined to extract the valuable element. The grade or concentration of an ore mineral, or metal, as well as its form of occurrence, will directly affect the costs associated with mining the ore. The cost of extraction must thus be weighed against the metal value contained in the rock to determine what ore can be processed and what ore is of too low a grade to be worth mining. Metal ores are generally oxides, sulfides, silicates, or "native" metals that are not commonly concentrated in the Earth's crust or "noble" metals such as gold. The ores must be processed to extract the metals of interest from the waste rock and from the ore minerals. Ore bodies are formed by a variety of geological processes. The process of ore formation is called ore genesis.

— Freebase

Malmberget

Malmberget

Malmberget ("The Ore Mountain", Finnish and Meänkieli: Malmivaara) is a locality and mining town situated in Gällivare Municipality, Norrbotten County, Sweden with 5,590 inhabitants in 2010. It is situated 5 kilometres from the municipal seat Gällivare. Malmberget is known as a major site for the extraction of iron ore from deep mines by the company LKAB. The iron ore mining started in 1741 at the Illuvaara mountain, later known as Gellivare malmberg and eventually just Malmberget. The first train which transported iron ore was loaded in 1888 - this was the beginning of the great iron ore rush which would change the entire area of Northern Lapland. In Malmberget there were lots of job opportunities but no dwellings - a striking resemblance to the conditions during some of the gold rushes in North America. During the first years, workers lived in shacks built from wasted dynamite crates. Right down the centre of Malmberget, the deep mine has reached daylight and thus created a huge hole called Kaptensgropen ("The Captain's Pit"). In March 2012, Kaptensgropen was joined with a new pit resulting from the 'Fabian'-deposit caving in as planned, and has grown southwards as the deep mining continues, and thus divided the town while making the old town centre uninhabitable and forcing many institutions (e.g. the two existing cinemas and the church) to move to the western part of Malmberget or, even more commonly, to the neighbouring town of Gällivare. Today Kaptensgropen is being filled up with stone which is dug up as a by-product from the underground mines. Kaptensgropen will eventually be filled in, but the uninhabitable area is continually growing as underground mining undermines the area and seismic events caused by the mining regularly shake the remaining parts of Malmberget. The future of Malmberget is currently uncertain, but prospecting by LKAB indicates that even more of Malmberget may have to move in the future. The moving of several large residential houses owned by the mining company, as well as private villas, has been a major issue locally for the past few years. The iron ore extracted from Malmberget is mainly transported by rail southeast to the port of Luleå. (See Swedish iron ore during World War II).

— Wikipedia

iron ores

iron ores

Character of Pig-iron.—Ores suitable for “gun-metal” should be reduced in the smelting-furnace, with charcoal and the warm blast, varying from 125° to 300° Fahr., depending upon the ore used. Iron thus made, or pig-iron, should be soft, yielding easily to the file and chisel; the appearance of the fracture should be uniform, with a brilliant aspect, dark gray color, and medium-sized crystals. Character of Gun-metal.—When remelted and cast into cannon, it should approach that degree of hardness which resists the file and chisel, but not so hard as to be bored and turned with much difficulty. Its color should be a bright, lively gray; crystals small, with acute angles, and sharp to the touch; structure uniform, close, and compact. Magnetite.—Octahedral Iron Ore.—Color iron-black. Streak black. Brittle. The black streak and magnetic properties distinguish this species from the following: Specular Iron Ore.—Hematite.—Often massive granular; sometimes lamellar or micaceous. Also pulverulent and earthy. Color, dark steel-gray or iron-black, and often when crystallized having a highly splendid lustre; streak-powder cherry-red or reddish-brown. The metallic varieties pass into an earthy ore of a red color, having none of the external characters of the crystals, but perfectly corresponding to them when they are pulverized, the powder they yield being of a deep red color, and earthy or without lustre. Sometimes slightly attracted by the magnet. Limonite.—Brown Iron Ore.—Usually massive, and often with a smooth botryoidal or stalactitic surface, having a compact fibrous structure within. Also earthy. Color, dark brown to ochre-yellow; streak, yellowish-brown to dull yellow. Lustre, sometimes sub-metallic; often dull and earthy; on a surface of fracture frequently silky. Spathic Iron.—Carbonate of Iron.—Chalybite.—Usually massive, with a foliated structure, somewhat curving. Sometimes in globular concretions or implanted globules. Color, light grayish to brown; often dark brownish-red, or nearly black on exposure. Streak, uncolored. Lustre, pearly to vitreous; translucent to nearly opaque.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

Wild pitch

Wild pitch

In baseball, a wild pitch is charged against a pitcher when his pitch is too high, too short, or too wide of home plate for the catcher to control with ordinary effort, thereby allowing a baserunner, perhaps even the batter-runner on strike three, to advance. A wild pitch usually passes the catcher behind home plate, often allowing runners on base an easy chance to advance while the catcher chases the ball down. Sometimes the catcher may block a pitch, and the ball may be nearby, but the catcher has trouble finding the ball, allowing runners to advance. A closely related statistic is the passed ball. As with many baseball statistics, whether a pitch that gets away from a catcher is counted as a wild pitch or a passed ball is at the discretion of the official scorer. The benefit of the doubt is usually given to the catcher if there is uncertainty; therefore, most of these situations are scored as wild pitches. If the pitch was so low as to touch the ground, or so high that the catcher has to jump to get to it, or so wide that the catcher has to lunge for it, it is usually then considered a wild pitch and not a passed ball. Because the pitcher and catcher handle the ball much more than other fielders, certain misplays on pitched balls are defined in Rule 10.15 as wild pitches and passed balls. No error shall be charged when a wild pitch or passed ball is scored.

— Freebase

Pitch count

Pitch count

In baseball statistics, pitch count is the number of pitches thrown by a pitcher in a game. Pitch counts are especially a concern for young pitchers, pitchers recovering from injury, or pitchers who have a history of injuries. The pitcher wants to keep the pitch count low because of his stamina. Often a starting pitcher will be removed from the game after 100 pitches, regardless of the actual number of innings pitched, as it is reckoned to be the maximum optimal pitch count for a starting pitcher. It is unclear if the specialization and reliance on relief pitchers led to pitch counts, or if pitch counts led to greater use of relievers. Pitch counts are sometimes less of a concern for veteran pitchers, who after years of conditioning are often able to pitch deeper into games. A pitcher's size, stature, athleticism, and pitches style can also play a role in how many pitches a pitcher can throw in a single game while maintaining effectiveness and without risking injury. Pitch count can also be used to gauge the effectiveness and efficiency of a pitcher. It is better under most circumstances for a pitcher to use the fewest number of pitches possible to get three outs.

— Freebase

Ore shoot

Ore shoot

An ore shoot is a mass of ore deposited in a vein.The ore shoot consists of the most valuable part of the ore deposit. An ore shoot is the area of concentration containing primary ore along the veins present in the rocks.

— Wikipedia

Pitch

Pitch

Pitch is a name for any of a number of viscoelastic, solid polymers. Pitch can be made from petroleum products or plants. Petroleum-derived pitch is also called bitumen or asphalt. Pitch produced from plants is also known as resin. Some products made from plant resin are also known as rosin. Pitch was traditionally used to help caulk the seams of wooden sailing vessels. Pitch was also used to waterproof wooden containers, and is sometimes still used in the making of torches. Petroleum-derived pitch is black in colour, hence the adjectival phrase, "pitch-black".

— Freebase

Cycloid gear

Cycloid gear

The cycloidal gear profile is a form of toothed gear used in mechanical clocks, rather than the involute gear form used for most other gears. The gear tooth profile is based on the epicycloid and hypocycloid curves, which are the curves generated by a circle rolling around the outside and inside of another circle, respectively. When two toothed gears mesh, an imaginary circle, the pitch circle, can be drawn around the centre of either gear through the point where their teeth make contact. The curves of the teeth outside the pitch circle are known as the addenda, and the curves of the tooth spaces inside the pitch circle are known as the dedenda. An addendum of one gear rests inside a dedendum of the other gear. In the cycloidal gears, the addenda of the wheel teeth are convex epi-cycloidal and the dedenda of the pinion are concave hypocycloidal curves generated by the same generating circle. This ensures that the motion of one gear is transferred to the other at locally constant angular velocity. The size of the generating circle may be freely chosen, mostly independent of the number of teeth. A Roots blower is one extreme, a form of cycloid gear where the ratio of the pitch diameter to the generating circle diameter equals twice the number of lobes. In a two-lobed blower, the generating circle is one-fourth the diameter of the pitch circles, and the teeth form complete epi- and hypo-cycloidal arcs. In clockmaking, the generating circle diameter is commonly chosen to be one-half the pitch diameter of one of the gears. This results in a dedendum which is a simple straight radial line, and therefore easy to shape and polish with hand tools. The addenda are not complete epicycloids, but portions of two different ones which intersect at a point, resulting in a "gothic arch" tooth profile. Limitation of this gear is that it works for a constant distance between centers of two gears. This condition -in most of the cases- is impractical because of involvement of vibration, and thus in most of the cases, involute profile of gear is used. There is some dispute over the invention of cycloidal gears. Those involved include Gérard Desargues, Philippe de La Hire, Ole Rømer, and Charles Étienne Louis Camus. A cycloid (as used for the flank shape of a cycloidal gear) is constructed by rolling a rolling circle on a base circle. If the diameter of this rolling circle is chosen to be infinitely large, a straight line is obtained. The resulting cycloid is then called involute and the gear is called involute gear. In this respect involute gears are only a special case of cycloidal gears.

— Wikipedia

Staff (music)

Staff (music)

In Western musical notation, the staff (US) or stave (UK) (plural for either: staves) is a set of five horizontal lines and four spaces that each represent a different musical pitch or in the case of a percussion staff, different percussion instruments. Appropriate music symbols, depending on the intended effect, are placed on the staff according to their corresponding pitch or function. Musical notes are placed by pitch, percussion notes are placed by instrument, and rests and other symbols are placed by convention. The absolute pitch of each line of a non-percussive staff is indicated by the placement of a clef symbol at the appropriate vertical position on the left-hand side of the staff (possibly modified by conventions for specific instruments). For example, the treble clef, also known as the G clef, is placed on the second line (counting upward), fixing that line as the pitch first G above "middle C". The lines and spaces are numbered from bottom to top; the bottom line is the first line and the top line is the fifth line. The musical staff is analogous to a mathematical graph of pitch with respect to time. Pitches of notes are given by their vertical position on the staff and notes are played from left to right. Unlike a graph, however, the number of semitones represented by a vertical step from a line to an adjacent space depends on the key, and the exact timing of the beginning of each note is not directly proportional to its horizontal position; rather, exact timing is encoded by the musical symbol chosen for each note in addition to the tempo. A time signature to the right of the clef indicates the relationship between timing counts and note symbols, while bar lines group notes on the staff into measures.

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. deathly
  • B. deific
  • C. lethal
  • D. pernicious