Synonyms containing place for rest

We've found 49,969 synonyms:

Rest

Rest

rest, n. cessation from motion or disturbance: peace: quiet: sleep: the final sleep, or death: place of rest, as an inn, &c.: repose: release: security: tranquillity: stay: that on which anything rests or is supported: a pause of the voice in reading: (mus.) an interval between tones, also its mark: in ancient armour, a projection from the cuirass to support the lance: a quick and continued returning of the ball at tennis: in the game of primero, the final stake made by the player.—v.i. to cease from action or labour: to be still: to repose: to sleep: to be dead: to be supported: to lean or trust: to be satisfied: to come to an end: to be undisturbed: to take rest: to lie: to trust: (law) to terminate voluntarily the adducing of evidence: to be in the power of, as 'it rests with you.'—v.t. to lay at rest: to quiet: to place on a support.—n. Rest′-cure, the treatment of exhaustion by isolation in bed.—adj. Rest′ful (Shak.), being at rest, quiet, giving rest.—adv. Rest′fully, in a state of rest.—ns. Rest′fulness, the state or quality of being restful: quietness; Rest′-house a house of rest for travellers in India, a dak-bungalow Rest′iness (obs.), sluggishness.—adj. Rest′ing-ow′ing (Scots law), indebted.—ns. Rest′ing-place, a place of security, or of rest, the grave: in building, a landing in a staircase; Rest′ing-spore, a spore which germinates after a period of dormancy; Rest′ing-stage, -state, a state of suspended activity, as of woody plants, bulbs; Rest′ing-while, a period of leisure.—At rest, applied to a body, means, having no velocity with respect to that on which the body stands. [A.S. rest, ræst; Ger. rast, Dut. rust.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Head

Head

hed, n. the uppermost or foremost part of an animal's body: the brain: the understanding: a chief or leader: the place of honour or command: the front or top of anything: an individual animal or person: a topic or chief point of a discourse: a title, heading: the source or spring: height of the source of water: highest point of anything: culmination: a cape: strength: a froth on beer, porter, &c., when poured into a glass.—v.t. to act as a head to, to lead or govern: to go in front of: to commence: to check: (naut.) to be contrary: (obs.) to behead.—v.i. to grow to a head: to originate: to go head foremost.—n. Head′ache, an internal pain in the head.—adj. Head′achy, afflicted with headaches.—ns. Head′band, a band or fillet for the head: the band at each end of a book: a thin slip of iron on the tympan of a printing-press; Head′-block, in a sawmill carriage, a cross-block on which the head of the log rests: a piece of wood in a carriage, connected with the spring and the perches, and joining the fore-gear and the hind-gear; Head′-board, a board placed at the head of anything, esp. a bedstead; Head′-boom, a jib-boom or a flying jib-boom; Head′bor′ough, an old term for the head of a borough, the chief of a frank pledge, tithing, or decennary; Head′-boy, the senior boy in a public school; Head′chair, a high-backed chair with a rest for the head; Head′-cheese, pork-cheese, brawn; Head′-chute, a canvas tube used to convey refuse matter from a ship's bows down to the water; Head′-cloth, a piece of cloth covering the head, wound round a turban, &c.; Head′-dress, an ornamental dress or covering for the head, worn by women.—p.adj. Head′ed, having a head: (Shak.) come to a head.—ns. Head′er, one who puts a head on something: a dive, head foremost, into water: a brick laid lengthwise along the thickness of a wall, serving as a bond: a heavy stone extending through the thickness of a wall; Head′-fast, a rope at the bows of a ship used to fasten it to a wharf, &c.; Head′-frame, the structure over a mine-shaft supporting the head-gear or winding machinery; Head′-gear, gear, covering, or ornament of the head; Head′-hunt′ing, the practice among the Dyaks of Borneo, &c., of making raids to procure human heads for trophies, &c.—adv. Head′ily.—ns. Head′iness; Head′ing, the act of furnishing with a head; that which stands at the head: material forming a head; Head′land, a point of land running out into the sea: a cape.—adj. Head′less, without a head.—ns. Head′-light, a light carried in front of a vessel, locomotive, or vehicle, as a signal, or for light; Head′-line, the line at the head or top of a page containing the folio or number of the page: (pl.) the sails and ropes next the yards (naut.).—adv.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Restore

Restore

rē-stōr′, v.t. to repair: to replace: to return: to bring back to its former state: to revive: to cure: to compensate: to mend: (mus.) to bring a note back to its original signification.—adj. Restōr′able, that may be restored to a former owner or condition.—ns. Restōr′ableness, the state or quality of being restorable; Restōrā′tion, act of restoring: replacement: recovery: revival: reparation: renewal: restoration of a building to its original design: (theol.) receiving of a sinner to the divine favour: the final recovery of all men: (palæont.) the proper adjustment of the bones of an extinct animal; Restōrā′tionist, one who holds the belief that after a purgation all wicked men and angels will be restored to the favour of God, a universalist.—adj. Restōr′ative, able or tending to restore, esp. to strength and vigour.—n. a medicine that restores.—adv. Restōr′atively.—ns. Restōre′ment; Restōr′er.—The Restoration, the re-establishment of the monarchy with the return of Charles II. in 1660. [Fr. restaurer—L. restaurāre, -ātumre-, again, root stāre, to stand.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sifo

Sifo

SIFO is a Swedish company earlier known as Sifo Research International in the area of opinion and social research. The company was founded in 1954 as Svenska institutet för opinionsundersökningar and known by the public under the abbreviation SIFO which is one of the strongest brands in Sweden. It is now a subsidiary of TNS Global which is part of the WPP Group plc. SIFO-TNS has its headquarters in Stockholm. Sifo has since 1967 published its public opinion poll "Voter monitor" which analyses the party allegiances of Swedish voters. Sifo is also known for one of the largest media surveys in the world – ORVESTO Konsument where every year almost 50 thousand people are interviewed about their media and consumption patterns. Sifo Research International merged with TNS Gallup during 2009. According to TNS-SIFO's Swedish website the merger is part of a larger reorganisation within the Kantar Group. The companies Research International, the global brand will be TNS, but local brands such as Research International and SIFO will be used in various countries. In Sweden the brand SIFO is very strong and the official name of the company in Sweden will therefore be TNS-SIFO AB. TNS-SIFO is the largest market research company in Sweden.

— Freebase

Repose

Repose

rē-pōz′, v.t. to lay at rest: to compose: to place in trust (with on or in): to deposit: to tranquillise.—v.i. to rest: to sleep: to rest in confidence (with on or upon): to lie.—n. a lying at rest: sleep: quiet: rest of mind: (fine art) that harmony which gives rest to the eye.—n. Repō′sal (Shak.), the act of reposing: that on which one reposes.—adj. Repōsed′, calm: settled.—adv. Repō′sedly.—n. Repō′sedness.—adj. Repōse′ful.—n. Repō′ser.—v.t. Repos′it, to lodge, as for safety—also n.ns. Repōsi′tion, reduction; Repos′itor, an instrument for restoring a displaced organ; Repos′itory, a place where anything is laid up for safe keeping: a place where things are kept for sale: a shop. [Fr. reposerre-, back, poser, to pose.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Place

Place

plās, n. a broad way in a city: an open space used for a particular purpose: a particular locality: a town: room to dwell, sit, or stand in: the position held by anybody, employment, office, a situation: a mansion with its grounds: proper position or dignity, priority in such: stead: passage in a book: a topic, matter of discourse: in sporting contests, position among the first three.—v.t. to put in any place or condition: to find a home for: to settle: to lend: invest: to ascribe.—n. Place′-hunt′er, one who seeks eagerly official position or public office.—adj. Place′less, without place or office.—ns. Place′man, one who has a place or office under a government:—pl. Place′men; Place′ment, placing or setting; Place′-mong′er, one who traffics in appointments to places; Place′-name, the name of a place or locality: a local name; Plac′er.—Give place, to make room, to yield; Have place, to have existence; In place, in position: opportune; Out of place, inappropriate, unseasonable; Take place, to come to pass: to take precedence of. [Fr.,—L. platea, a broad street—Gr. plateia, a street—platys, broad.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Love

Love

luv, n. fondness: an affection of the mind caused by that which delights: pre-eminent kindness: benevolence: reverential regard: devoted attachment to one of the opposite sex: the object of affection: the god of love, Cupid: (Shak.) a kindness, a favour done: nothing, in billiards, tennis, and some other games.—v.t. to be fond of: to regard with affection: to delight in with exclusive affection: to regard with benevolence.—v.i. to have the feeling of love.—adj. Lov′able, worthy of love: amiable.—ns. Love′-app′le, the fruit of the tomato; Love′bird, a genus of small birds of the parrot tribe, so called from their attachment to each other; Love′-brok′er (Shak.), a third person who carries messages and makes assignations between lovers; Love′-charm, a philtre; Love′-child, a bastard; Love′-day (Shak.), a day for settling disputes; Love′-fā′vour, something given to be worn in token of love; Love′-feast, a religious feast held periodically by certain sects of Christians in imitation of the love-feasts celebrated by the early Christians in connection with the Lord's-supper; Love′-feat, the gallant act of a lover; Love′-in-ī′dleness, the heart's-ease; Love′-juice, a concoction used to excite love; Love′-knot, an intricate knot, used as a token of love.—adj. Love′less, without love, tenderness, or kindness.—ns. Love′-lett′er, a letter of courtship; Love′-lies-bleed′ing, a species of the plant Amaranthus; Love′liness; Love′lock, a lock of hair hanging at the ear, worn by men of fashion in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.—adj. Love′lorn, forsaken by one's love.—n. Love′lornness.adj. Love′ly, exciting love or admiration: amiable: pleasing: delightful.—adv. beautifully, delightfully.—ns. Love′-match, a marriage for love, not money; Love′-mong′ėr, one who deals in affairs of love; Love′-pō′tion, a philtre; Lov′er, one who loves, esp. one in love with person of the opposite sex, in the singular almost exclusively of the man: one who is fond of anything: (B.) a friend.—adjs. Lov′ered (Shak.), having a lover; Lov′erly, like a lover.—n. Love′-shaft, a dart of love from Cupid's bow.—adjs. Love′-sick, languishing with amorous desire; Love′some, lovely.—ns. Love′-suit (Shak.), courtship; Love′-tō′ken, a gift in evidence of love.—adj. Lov′ing, having love or kindness: affectionate: fond: expressing love.—ns.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Place attachment

Place attachment

Place attachment is the emotional bond between person and place, and is a main concept in environmental psychology. It is highly influenced by an individual and his or her personal experiences. There is a considerable amount of research dedicated to defining what makes a place "meaningful" enough for place attachment to occur. Schroeder (1991) notably discussed the difference between "meaning" and "preference," defining meaning as "the thoughts, feelings, memories and interpretations evoked by a landscape" and preference as "the degree of liking for one landscape compared to another."Place attachment is multi-dimensional and cannot be explained simply through a cause and effect relationship. Instead, it depends on a reciprocal relationship between behavior and experiences. Due to numerous varying opinions on the definition and components of place attachment, organizational models have been scarce until recent years. A noteworthy conceptual framework is the Tripartite Model, developed by Scannell and Gifford (2010), which defines the variables of place attachment as the three P’s: Person, Process, and Place.When describing place attachment, scholars differentiate between a “rootedness” and a “sense of place”. Sense of place attachment arises as the result of cultivation of meaning and artifacts associated with created places. Due to constant migration over the past few centuries, Americans are thought to most commonly have this type of place attachment, as they have not stayed in a place long enough to develop storied roots. Rootedness, on the other hand, is an unconscious attachment to a place due to familiarity achieved through continuous residence––perhaps that of a familial lineage that has known this place in the years before the current resident. Little is known about the neurological changes that make place attachment possible because of the exaggerated focus on social aspects by environmental psychologists, the difficulties in measuring place attachment over time, and the heavy influence of individualistic experiences and emotions on the degree of attachment.

— Wikipedia

Quiet

Quiet

kwī′et, adj. at rest: calm: smooth: peaceable: gentle, inoffensive: silent, still: free from gaudiness, in good taste: free from bustle or formality.—n. the state of being at rest: repose: calm: stillness: peace.—v.t. to bring to rest: to stop motion: to calm or pacify: to lull: to allay.—v.i. to become quiet, to abate.—n. Quī′etāge (Spens.), quiet.—v.t. Quī′eten, to make quiet, calm.—v.i. to become quiet.—n. Quī′eter (Shak.), a person or thing that quiets.—v.t. Quī′etise, to make quiet.—ns. Quī′etism, rest of the mind: mental tranquillity: apathy: the doctrine that religious perfection on earth consists in passive and uninterrupted contemplation of the Deity; Quī′etist, one who believes in this doctrine (Molinos, Mme. Guyon, &c.).—adj. Quietist′ic, pertaining to quietism.—n. Quī′etive, anything that induces quiet.—adv. Quī′etly, in a quiet manner: without motion or alarm: calmly: silently: patiently.—ns. Quī′etness, Quī′etude, rest: repose: freedom from agitation or alarm: stillness: peace: silence.—adj. Quī′etsome (Spens.), calm, still, undisturbed.—n. Quiē′tus, a final settlement or discharge: ending generally: (slang) a severe blow.—At quiet (B.), peaceful; In quiet, quietly; On the quiet, clandestinely; Out of quiet, disturbed. [L. quietusquiscĕre, to rest.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sabbath

Sabbath

sab′ath, n. among the Jews, the seventh day of the week, set apart for the rest from work: among Christians, the first day of the week, in memory of the resurrection of Christ, called also Sunday and the Lord's Day: among the ancient Jews, the seventh year, when the land was left fallow: a time of rest.—adj. pertaining to the Sabbath.—n. Sabbatā′rian, a very strict observer of the Sabbath: one who observes the seventh day of the week as the Sabbath.—adj. pertaining to the Sabbath or to Sabbatarians.—ns. Sabbatā′rianism; Sabb′ath-break′er, one who profanes the Sabbath; Sabb′ath-break′ing, profanation of the Sabbath.—adjs. Sabb′athless (Bacon), without Sabbath or interval of rest: without intermission of labour; Sabbat′ic, -al, pertaining to, or resembling, the Sabbath: enjoying or bringing rest.—n. Sabbat′ical-year, every seventh year, in which the Israelites allowed their fields and vineyards to lie fallow.—adj. Sabb′atine, pertaining to the Sabbath.—v.i. and v.t. Sabb′atise, to keep the Sabbath: to convert into a Sabbath.—n. Sabb′atism, rest, as on the Sabbath: intermission of labour.—Sabbath-day's journey, the distance of 2000 cubits, or about five furlongs, which a Jew was permitted to walk on the Sabbath, fixed by the space between the extreme end of the camp and the ark (Josh. iii. 4); Sabbath School (see Sunday school).—Witches' Sabbath, a midnight meeting of Satan with witches, devils, and sorcerers for unhallowed orgies and the travestying of divine rites. [L. Sabbatum, gener. in pl. Sabbata—Gr. Sabbaton—Heb. Shabbāth, rest.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Rest area

Rest area

A rest area, travel plaza, rest stop, or service area is a public facility, located next to a large thoroughfare such as a highway, expressway, or freeway at which drivers and passengers can rest, eat, or refuel without exiting on to secondary roads. Other names include motorway service area or service station in the UK, rest and service area, resto, service plaza,service center, and service centre. Facilities may include park-like areas, fuel stations, restrooms, and restaurants. A rest area or rest stop with limited or no public facility is a parking area or scenic area. Along some highways and roads are rest stops known as a wayside parks, roadside parks, or picnic areas. Rest areas are common in the United States, Canada, Australia and parts of Europe and Asia.

— Freebase

Requiem

Requiem

rē′kwi-em, n. a hymn or mass sung for the rest of the soul of the dead: a grand musical composition in honour of the dead: (obs.) rest, peace.—n. Requies′cence, repose.—Requiescat in pace, may he (or she) rest in peace, often abbreviated R.I.P. [L., accus. of requies—(re-, inten., quies, rest); so called from the initial words of the introit, Requiem æternam dona eis, Domine! 'Give eternal rest to them, O Lord!']

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sleep

Sleep

slēp, v.i. to take rest by relaxation: to become unconscious: to slumber: to rest: to be motionless or inactive: to remain unnoticed: to live thoughtlessly: to be dead: to rest in the grave:—pa.t. and pa.p. slept.—n. the state of one who, or that which, sleeps: slumber: rest: the dormancy of some animals during winter: (bot.) nyctitropism.—n. Sleep′er, one who sleeps: a horizontal timber supporting a weight, rails, &c.—adv. Sleep′ily.—n. Sleep′iness.—p.adj. Sleep′ing, occupied with, or for, sleeping: dormant.—n. the state of resting in sleep: (Shak.) the state of being at rest or in abeyance.—ns. Sleep′ing-car, -carriage, a railway-carriage in which passengers have berths for sleeping in; Sleep′ing-draught, a drink given to bring on sleep; Sleep′ing-part′ner (see Partner).—adj. Sleep′less, without sleep: unable to sleep.—adv. Sleep′lessly.—ns. Sleep′lessness; Sleep′-walk′er, one who walks while asleep: a somnambulist; Sleep′-walking.—adj. Sleep′y, inclined to sleep: drowsy: dull: lazy.—n. Sleep′yhead, a lazy person.—On sleep (B.), asleep. [A.S. slǽpanslǽp; Ger. schlaf, Goth. sleps.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Place-based education

Place-based education

Place-based education, sometimes called pedagogy of place, place-based learning, experiential education, community-based education, education for sustainability, environmental education or more rarely, service learning, is an educational philosophy. The term was coined in the early 1990s by Laurie Lane-Zucker of The Orion Society and Dr. John Elder of Middlebury College. Orion's early work in the area of place-based education was funded by the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation. Although educators have used its principles for some time, the approach was developed initially by The Orion Society, a Massachusetts-based nonprofit organization, as well as Professor David Sobel, Project Director at Antioch University New England. Place-based education seeks to help communities through employing students and school staff in solving community problems. Place-based education differs from conventional text and classroom-based education in that it understands students' local community as one of the primary resources for learning. Thus, place-based education promotes learning that is rooted in what is local—the unique history, environment, culture, economy, literature, and art of a particular place—that is, in students' own "place" or immediate schoolyard, neighborhood, town or community. According to this pedagogy, grade school students often lose what place-based educators call their "sense of place" through focusing too quickly or exclusively on national or global issues. This is not to say that international and domestic issues are peripheral to place-based education, but that students should first have a grounding in the history, culture and ecology of their surrounding environment before moving on to broader subjects. Place-based education is often interdisciplinary. It aligns with several popular pedagogies, including thematic, hands-on, or project-based learning. Place-based curriculum begins with topics or issues from the local community.

— Wikipedia

home

home

A place of refuge and rest; an asylum; as, a home for outcasts; a home for the blind; hence, especially, the grave; the final rest; also, the native and eternal dwelling place of the soul.

— Wiktionary

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An antonym for "curdled"
  • A. solidified
  • B. grumous
  • C. coagulated
  • D. thin