Synonyms containing pleasing succession of sounds

We've found 3,273 synonyms:

Ecological succession

Ecological succession

Ecological succession is the observed process of change in the species structure of an ecological community over time. The community begins with relatively few pioneering plants and animals and develops through increasing complexity until it becomes stable or self-perpetuating as a climax community. It is a phenomenon or process by which an ecological community undergoes more or less orderly and predictable changes following disturbance or initial colonization of new habitat. Succession may be initiated either by formation of new, unoccupied habitat or by some form of disturbance of an existing community. Succession that begins in new habitats, uninfluenced by pre-existing communities is called primary succession, whereas succession that follows disruption of a pre-existing community is called secondary succession. Succession was among the first theories advanced in ecology and the study of succession remains at the core of ecological science. Ecological succession was first documented in the Indiana Dunes of Northwest Indiana which led to efforts to preserve the Indiana Dunes. Exhibits on ecological succession are displayed in the Hour Glass, a museum in Ogden Dunes.

— Freebase

Secondary succession

Secondary succession

Secondary succession is one of the two types of ecological succession of plant life. As opposed to the first, primary succession, secondary succession is a process started by an event that reduces an already established ecosystem to a smaller population of species, and as such secondary succession occurs on preexisting soil whereas primary succession usually occurs in a place lacking soil. Simply put, secondary succession is the succession that occurs after the initial succession has been disrupted and some plants and animals still exist. It is usually faster than primary succession as: ⁕Soil is already present, so there is no need for pioneer species; ⁕Seeds, roots and underground vegetative organs of plants may still survive in the soil.

— Freebase

Succeed

Succeed

suk-sēd′, v.t. to come after, to follow up or in order: to follow: to take the place of.—v.i. to follow in order: to take the place of: to obtain one's wish or accomplish what is attempted: to end with advantage.—adjs. Succeed′able, capable of success; Succeed′ant (her.), following one another.—ns. Succeed′er, one who succeeds: a successor; Success′, act of succeeding or state of having succeeded: the prosperous termination of anything attempted: one who, or that which, succeeds, a successful person or affair.—adj. Success′ful, resulting in success: having the desired effect or termination: prosperous.—adv. Success′fully.—ns. Success′fulness, state of being successful: success; Succes′sion, act of succeeding or following after: series of persons or things following each other in time or place: series of descendants: race: (agri.) rotation, as of crops: right to take possession: in Roman and Scots law, the taking of property by one person in place of another.—adj. Succes′sional, existing in a regular succession or in order.—adv. Succes′sionally.—n. Succes′sionist, one who regards only that priesthood as valid which can be traced in a direct line of succession from the apostles.—adj. Succes′sive, following in succession or in order.—adv. Succes′sively.—n. Succes′siveness.—adj. Success′less, without success: unprosperous.—ns. Succes′sor, one who succeeds or comes after: one who takes the place of another; Succes′sorship.—adj. Succes′sory.—Succession duty, a tax imposed on any succession to property, varying with the degree of relationship.—Apostolical succession (see Apostle). [L. succedĕresub, up, cedĕre, to go.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Izgoi

Izgoi

Izgoi is a term that is found in medieval Kievan Rus'. In primary documents, it indicated orphans who were protected by the church. In historiographic writing on the period, it meant a prince in Kievan Rus' who was excluded from succession to the Kievan throne because his father had not held the throne before. In Kievan Rus', as well as Appanage and early Muscovite Russia, collateral succession, rather than linear succession, was practiced, with the throne being passed from eldest brother to youngest brother and then to cousins until the fourth in line of succession (not to be confused with "fourth cousins") in a generation before it was passed on to the eldest member of the senior line if his father had held the Kievan throne. The princes were placed in a hierarchy or "ladder" or "staircase" of principalities, which Sergei Soloviev called the "Rota System" (rota being the Old Church Slavic term for a ladder or staircase), with Kiev as the pinnacle. When the grand prince of Kiev died, the next prince on the ladder moved up the ladder, and the rest advanced a rung as well.Any prince whose father had not held the throne, such as for having predeceased the grandfather, who was then grand prince, was excluded from succession and was known as izgoi.The term is also found in the Expanded version of the Russkaya Pravda, where it meant an orphan or exile; thus, an izgoi prince is in some sense seen as an "orphaned" or "exiled" prince since he was left outside of the succession to the Kievan throne. However, he was not, usually, landless, unlike what is sometimes stated, as he still held the patrimonial land granted to him in the provinces. A good example of an izgoi prince would be Vseslav of Polotsk, whose father, Briacheslav (d. 1044) and grandfather (Iziaslav d. 1020) both predeceased Vseslav's great-grandfather, Vladimir the Great (d. 1015). Thus, Vseslav was izgoi since he could not legitimately claim the grand princely throne in Kiev: neither his father nor his grandfather had sat on the throne. He, however, remained prince of Polotsk, in Northeast Belarus. Furthermore, in spite of his excluded status, Vseslav briefly seized the throne of Kiev in 1069 but held it only six months before he was ousted. Another example (there are many others) would be Rostislav Vladimirovich, the son of Vladimir Yaroslavich. Since Vladimir had died in 1052, two years before his father, Yaroslav the Wise (d. 1054), he had never held the Kievan throne, and Rostislav was an izgoi. His descendants, however, became princes of Galicia, in northwestern Ukraine. They were excluded from holding the grand-princely throne in Kiev but were not landless.

— Wikipedia

Voder

Voder

The Bell Telephone Laboratory's Voder (from Voice Operating Demonstrator) was the first attempt to electronically synthesize human speech by breaking it down into its acoustic components. It was invented by Homer Dudley in 1937–1938 and developed on his earlier work on the vocoder. The quality of the speech was limited; however, it demonstrated the synthesis of the human voice, which became one component of the vocoder used in voice communications for security and to save bandwidth. The Voder synthesized human speech by imitating the effects of the human vocal tract. The operator could select one of two basic sounds by using a wrist bar. A buzz tone generated by a relaxation oscillator produced the voiced vowels and nasal sounds, with the pitch controlled by a foot pedal. A hissing noise produced by a white noise tube created the sibilants (voiceless fricative sounds). These initial sounds were passed through a bank of 10 band pass filters that were selected by keys; their outputs were combined, amplified and fed to a loudspeaker. The filters were controlled by a set of keys and a foot pedal to convert the hisses and tones into vowels, consonants, and inflections. Additional special keys were provided to make the plosive sounds such as "p" or "d", and the affrictive sounds of the "j" in "jaw" and the "ch" in "cheese". This was a complex machine to operate. After months of practice, a trained operator could produce recognizable speech. Performances on the Voder were featured at the 1939 New York World's Fair and in San Francisco. Twenty operators were trained by Helen Harper, particularly noted for her skill with the machine. The machine said the words "Good afternoon, radio audience."The Voder was developed from research into compression schemes for transmission of voice on copper wires and for voice encryption. In 1948, Werner Meyer-Eppler recognized the capability of the Voder machine to generate electronic music, as described in Dudley's patent. Whereas the vocoder analyzes speech, transforms it into electronically transmitted information, and recreates it, the voder generates synthesized speech by means of a console with fifteen touch-sensitive keys and a pedal. It basically consists of the "second half" of the vocoder, but with manual filter controls, and requires a highly trained operator.

— Wikipedia

Auscultation

Auscultation

Auscultation is the term for listening to the internal sounds of the body, usually using a stethoscope. Auscultation is performed for the purposes of examining the circulatory system and respiratory system, as well as the gastrointestinal system. The term was introduced by René-Théophile-Hyacinthe Laënnec. The act of listening to body sounds for diagnostic purposes has its origin further back in history, possibly as early as Ancient Egypt. Laënnec's contributions were refining the procedure, linking sounds with specific pathological changes in the chest, and inventing a suitable instrument in the process. Originally, there was a distinction between immediate auscultation and mediate auscultation. Auscultation is a skill that requires substantial clinical experience, a fine stethoscope and good listening skills. Doctors listen to three main organs and organ systems during auscultation: the heart, the lungs, and the gastrointestinal system. When auscultating the heart, doctors listen for abnormal sounds including heart murmurs, gallops, and other extra sounds coinciding with heartbeats. Heart rate is also noted. When listening to lungs, breath sounds such as wheezes, crepitations and crackles are identified. The gastrointestinal system is auscultated to note the presence of bowel sounds.

— Freebase

Soundscape

Soundscape

A soundscape is a sound or combination of sounds that forms or arises from an immersive environment. The study of soundscape is the subject of acoustic ecology. The idea of soundscape refers to both the natural acoustic environment, consisting of natural sounds, including animal vocalizations and, for instance, the sounds of weather and other natural elements; and environmental sounds created by humans, through musical composition, sound design, and other ordinary human activities including conversation, work, and sounds of mechanical origin resulting from use of industrial technology. The disruption of these acoustic environments results in noise pollution. The term "soundscape" can also refer to an audio recording or performance of sounds that create the sensation of experiencing a particular acoustic environment, or compositions created using the found sounds of an acoustic environment, either exclusively or in conjunction with musical performances.

— Freebase

Apostolic succession

Apostolic succession

Apostolic succession is the method whereby the ministry of the Christian Church is held to be derived from the apostles by a continuous succession, which has usually been associated with a claim that the succession is through a series of bishops. This series was seen originally as that of the bishops of a particular see founded by one or more of the apostles, but it is generally understood today as meaning a series of bishops, regardless of see, each consecrated by other bishops themselves consecrated similarly in a succession going back to the apostles. Apostolic succession "may also be understood as a continuity in doctrinal teaching from the time of the apostles to the present"

— Freebase

Simultaneity

Simultaneity

In music, a simultaneity is more than one complete musical texture occurring at the same time, rather than in succession. This first appeared in the music of Charles Ives, and is common in the music of Conlon Nancarrow and others. In music theory, a pitch simultaneity is more than one pitch or pitch class all of which occur at the same time, or simultaneously. Simultaneity is a more general term than chord: most chords or harmonies are then simultaneities, though not all simultaneities are chords. A simultaneity succession is a series of different groups of pitches or pitch classes, each of which is played at the same time as the other pitches of its group. Thus, a simultaneity succession is a succession of simultaneities. Similarly, simultaneity succession is a more general term than chord progression or harmonic progression: most chord progressions or harmonic progressions are then simultaneity successions, though not all simultaneity successions are harmonic progressions and not all simultaneities are chords.

— Freebase

Succession planning

Succession planning

Succession planning is a process for identifying and developing internal people with the potential to fill key business leadership positions in the company. Succession planning increases the availability of experienced and capable employees that are prepared to assume these roles as they become available. Taken narrowly, "replacement planning" for key roles is the heart of succession planning. Effective succession or talent-pool management concerns itself with building a series of feeder groups up and down the entire leadership pipeline or progression. In contrast, replacement planning is focused narrowly on identifying specific back-up candidates for given senior management positions. For the most part position-driven replacement planning is a forecast, which research indicates does not have substantial impact on outcomes. Fundamental to the succession-management process is an underlying philosophy that argues that top talent in the corporation must be managed for the greater good of the enterprise. Merck and other companies argue that a "talent mindset" must be part of the leadership culture for these practices to be effective.

— Freebase

telephone

telephone

An instrument for reproducing sounds, especially articulate speech, at a distance, by the aid of electricity or electro-magnetism. It consists essentially of a device by which currents of electricity, produced by the sounds, and exactly corresponding in duration and intensity to the vibrations of the air which attend them, are transmitted to a distant station, and there, acting on suitable mechanism, reproduce similar sounds by repeating the vibrations. Telephones were recently used by Sir Garnet Wolseley in the war in Zululand, and are being rapidly adopted in European armies.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

Kouji

Kouji

Kouji (Chinese: 口技), which can be translated literally as "mouth skill" or "skill of mouth" is a Chinese vocal mimicry performance art which utilizes the human speech organs to mimic the sounds of everyday life. When this vocal mimicry is combined with varying degrees of story telling, acting, and singing, it results in the basic structure for a Kouji performance. The sounds most commonly used in Kouji tend to be those of animals, such as birds or dogs, but with the advancement of technology, Kouji has also come to incorporate imitations of busses, planes, and modern weapons. It is also now common to use a microphone in the performance of Kouji. Often the Kouji of a highly skilled performer so accurately mimics real life sounds that if the audience were to close their eyes, they might not be able to tell that the sounds were being produced by a human. Although it is an art form in and of itself, it may often be performed in combination with other traditional Chinese art forms such as Cross-talk. The primary objective of a Kouji performance is to bring joy to the audience through the sounds of their everyday lives, in a celebration of the harmony which exists between human beings and nature.

— Wikipedia

Voice

Voice

Voice or voicing is a term used in phonetics and phonology to characterize speech sounds, with sounds described as either voiceless or voiced. The term, however, is used to refer to two separate concepts. Voicing can refer to the articulatory process in which the vocal cords vibrate. This is its primary use in phonetics to describe phones, which are particular speech sounds. It can also refer to a classification of speech sounds that tend to be associated with vocal cord vibration but need not actually be voiced at the articulatory level. This is the term's primary use in phonology when describing phonemes, or in phonetics when describing phones. At the articulatory level, a voiced sound is one in which the vocal cords vibrate, and a voiceless sound is one in which they do not. For example, voicing accounts for the difference between the pair of sounds associated with the English letters "s" and "z". The two sounds are transcribed as and to distinguish them from the English letters, which have several possible pronunciations depending on context. If one places the fingers on the voice box, one can feel a vibration when one pronounces zzzz, but not when one pronounces ssss. In most European languages, with a notable exception being Icelandic, vowels and other sonorants are modally voiced.

— Freebase

Phonetics

Phonetics

Phonetics is a branch of linguistics that comprises the study of the sounds of human speech, or—in the case of sign languages—the equivalent aspects of sign. It is concerned with the physical properties of speech sounds or signs: their physiological production, acoustic properties, auditory perception, and neurophysiological status. Phonology, on the other hand, is concerned with the abstract, grammatical characterization of systems of sounds or signs. The field of phonetics is a multiple layered subject of linguistics that focuses on speech. In the case of oral languages there are three basic areas of study: ⁕Articulatory phonetics: the study of the production of speech sounds by the articulatory and vocal tract by the speaker ⁕Acoustic phonetics: the study of the physical transmission of speech sounds from the speaker to the listener ⁕Auditory phonetics: the study of the reception and perception of speech sounds by the listener These areas are inter-connected through the common mechanism of sound, such as wavelength, amplitude, and harmonics.

— Freebase

Heart sounds

Heart sounds

Heart sounds are the noises generated by the beating heart and the resultant flow of blood through it. In cardiac auscultation, an examiner may use a stethoscope to listen for these unique and distinct sounds that provide important auditory data regarding the condition of the heart to a trained observer. In healthy adults, there are two normal heart sounds often described as a lub and a dub, that occur in sequence with each heartbeat. These are the first heart sound and second heart sound, produced by the closing of the AV valves and semilunar valves respectively. In addition to these normal sounds, a variety of other sounds may be present including heart murmurs, adventitious sounds, and gallop rhythms S3 and S4. Heart murmurs are generated by turbulent flow of blood, which may occur inside or outside the heart. Murmurs may be physiological or pathological. Abnormal murmurs can be caused by stenosis restricting the opening of a heart valve, resulting in turbulence as blood flows through it. Abnormal murmurs may also occur with valvular insufficiency, which allows backflow of blood when the incompetent valve closes with only partial effectiveness. Different murmurs are audible in different parts of the cardiac cycle, depending on the cause of the murmur.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. deific
  • B. lethal
  • C. deathly
  • D. pernicious