Synonyms containing portable internet

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Internet studies

Internet studies

Internet studies is an interdisciplinary field studying the social, psychological, pedagogical, political, technical, cultural, artistic, and other dimensions of the Internet and associated information and communication technologies. While studies of the Internet are now widespread across academic disciplines, there is a growing collaboration among these investigations. In recent years, Internet studies have become institutionalized as courses of study at several institutions of higher learning. Cognates are found in departments of a number of other names, including departments of "Internet and Society", "virtual society", "digital culture", "new media" or "convergent media", various "iSchools", or programs like "Media in Transition" at MIT. On the research side, Internet studies intersects with studies of cyberculture, human–computer interaction, and science and technology studies. Internet and society is a research field that addresses the interrelationship of Internet and society, i.e. how society has changed the Internet and how the Internet has changed society.The topic of social issues relating to Internet has become notable since the rise of the World Wide Web, which can be observed from the fact that journals and newspapers run many stories on topics such as cyberlove, cyberhate, Web 2.0, cybercrime, cyberpolitics, Internet economy, etc. As most of the scientific monographs that have considered Internet and society in their book titles are social theoretical in nature, internet and society can be considered as a primarily social theoretical research approach of Internet studies.

— Wikipedia

InternetNZ

InternetNZ

InternetNZ ("Internet New Zealand Inc." and originally formed as the Internet Society of New Zealand) is a not-for-profit open membership organisation dedicated to protecting and promoting the Internet for New Zealand. Its vision is for a better world through a better Internet and it promotes the Internet’s benefits and protect its potential. InternetNZ focuses on advancing an open and uncaptureable Internet for New Zealand. It provides a voice for the Internet in New Zealand. It lobbies the government. And it gives a helping hand to Internet users across New Zealand. InternetNZ is the designated manager for the .nz Internet domain, and through this role it represents New Zealand at a global level. It provides community funding to promote research and the discovery of ways to improve the Internet. It informs people about the Internet and ensures it is well understood by those making decisions that help shape it. Every year it brings the Internet community together at NetHui to share wisdom and best practice on the state of the Internet.

— Wikipedia

Portable computer

Portable computer

A portable computer is a computer that is designed to be moved from one place to another and includes a display and keyboard. Portable computers, by their nature, are generally microcomputers. Portable computers, because of their size, are also commonly known as 'Lunchbox' or 'Luggable' computers. They can also be called a 'Portable Workstation' or 'Portable PC'. The principal advantage of a portable computer versus a laptop or other mobile computing device is the use of standard motherboards or backplanes providing plug-in slots for add-in cards. This allows mission specific cards such as test, A/D, or communication protocol to be installed. Portable computers also provide for more disk storage by using standard 3-1/2" drives and providing for multiple drives.

— Freebase

Internet meme

Internet meme

An Internet meme is an idea, style or action which spreads, often as mimicry, from person to person via the Internet, as with imitating the concept. Some notable examples include: replying to a joke by writing, "LOL!" or posting a photo of people in public places lying down planking, or uploading a short video of people performing the Harlem Shake. A meme can be considered a mimicked theme, including simple phrases or gestures. An Internet meme may take the form of an image, hyperlink, video, picture, website, or hashtag. It may be just a word or phrase, including an intentional misspelling. These small movements tend to spread from person to person via social networks, blogs, direct email, or news sources. They may relate to various existing Internet cultures or subcultures, often created or spread on sites such as 4chan and numerous others. Fads and sensations tend to grow rapidly on the Internet, because the instant communication facilitates word-of-mouth transmission. The word "meme" was coined by Richard Dawkins in his 1976 book The Selfish Gene, as an attempt to explain the way cultural information spreads; Internet memes are a subset of this general meme concept specific to the culture and environment of the Internet. In 2013 Dawkins characterized an Internet meme as being a meme deliberately altered by human creativity—distinguished from biological genes and Dawkins' pre-Internet concept of a meme which involved mutation by random change and spreading through accurate replication as in Darwinian selection. Dawkins explained that Internet memes are thus a "hijacking of the original idea," the very idea of a meme having mutated and evolved in this new direction. Further, Internet memes carry an additional property that ordinary memes do not—Internet memes leave a footprint in the media through which they propagate that renders them traceable and analyzable.

— Freebase

Portable stove

Portable stove

A portable stove is a cooking stove specially designed to be portable and lightweight, used in camping, picnicking, backpacking, or other use in remote locations where an easily transportable means of cooking or heating is needed. Portable stoves can be used in diverse situations, such as for outdoor food service and catering and in field hospitals.Since the invention of the portable stove in the 19th century, a wide variety of designs and models have seen use in a number of different applications. Portable stoves can be broken down into several broad categories based on the type of fuel used and stove design: unpressurized stoves that use solid or liquid fuel placed in the burner before ignition; stoves that use a volatile liquid fuel in a pressurized burner; bottled gas stoves; and gravity-fed "spirit" stoves.

— Wikipedia

Portable classroom

Portable classroom

A portable classroom (also known as a demountable or relocatable classroom, portables), is a type of portable building installed at a school to temporarily and quickly provide additional classroom space where there is a shortage of capacity. They are designed so they may be removed once the capacity situation abates, whether by a permanent addition to the school, another school being opened in the area, or a reduction in student population. Such buildings would be installed much like a mobile home, with utilities often being attached to a main building to provide light and heat for the room. Portable classrooms may also be used if permanent classrooms are uninhabitable, such as after a fire or during a major refurbishment. Sometimes, the portable classrooms are meant to be long-lasting and are built as "portapacks". A portapack combines a series of portables and connects them with a hallway. Portapacks are usually separated from the main building but can connect to the school. In most cases, portapacks are accompanied with a few separate portables. Portable classrooms are also colloquially known as bungalows, slum classes, t-shacks, trailers, terrapins, huts, t-buildings, portables, or relocatables. In the UK those built during 1945-50 were known as HORSA huts after the name of the Government's post-war building programme, "Hutting Operation for the Raising of the School-leaving Age". Others in the UK are often known as 'prattens' or 'Pratten huts' after the former Prattens company that supplied many of them after World War II.

— Wikipedia

ICANN

ICANN

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN EYE-kan) is a nonprofit organization responsible for coordinating the maintenance and procedures of several databases related to the namespaces and numerical spaces of the Internet, ensuring the network's stable and secure operation. ICANN performs the actual technical maintenance work of the Central Internet Address pools and DNS root zone registries pursuant to the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) function contract. The contract regarding the IANA stewardship functions between ICANN and the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) of the United States Department of Commerce ended on October 1, 2016, formally transitioning the functions to the global multistakeholder community.Much of its work has concerned the Internet's global Domain Name System (DNS), including policy development for internationalization of the DNS system, introduction of new generic top-level domains (TLDs), and the operation of root name servers. The numbering facilities ICANN manages include the Internet Protocol address spaces for IPv4 and IPv6, and assignment of address blocks to regional Internet registries. ICANN also maintains registries of Internet Protocol identifiers. ICANN's primary principles of operation have been described as helping preserve the operational stability of the Internet; to promote competition; to achieve broad representation of the global Internet community; and to develop policies appropriate to its mission through bottom-up, consensus-based processes.ICANN's creation was announced publicly on September 17, 1998,and it formally came into being on September 30, 1998, incorporated in the U.S. state of California. Originally headquartered in Marina del Rey in the same building as the University of Southern California's Information Sciences Institute (ISI)], its offices are now in the Playa Vista neighborhood of Los Angeles.

— Wikipedia

Internet Assigned Numbers Authority

Internet Assigned Numbers Authority

The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) is a standards organization that oversees global IP address allocation, autonomous system number allocation, root zone management in the Domain Name System (DNS), media types, and other Internet Protocol-related symbols and Internet numbers.Currently it is a function of ICANN, a nonprofit private American corporation established in 1998 primarily for this purpose under a United States Department of Commerce contract. Before it, IANA was administered principally by Jon Postel at the Information Sciences Institute (ISI) of the University of Southern California (USC) situated at Marina Del Rey (Los Angeles), under a contract USC/ISI had with the United States Department of Defense. Following ICANN's transition to a global multistakeholder governance model, the IANA functions were transferred to Public Technical Identifiers, an affiliate of ICANN.In addition, five regional Internet registries delegate number resources to their customers, local Internet registries, Internet service providers, and end-user organizations. A local Internet registry is an organization that assigns parts of its allocation from a regional Internet registry to other customers. Most local Internet registries are also Internet service providers.

— Wikipedia

Vint Cerf

Vint Cerf

Vinton G. Cerf is vice president and Chief Internet Evangelist for Google. He is responsible for identifying new enabling technologies and applications on the Internet and other platforms for Google. Widely known as one of the "Fathers of the Internet," Cerf is the co-designer of the TCP/IP protocols and the architecture of the Internet. In December 1997, President Clinton presented the U.S. National Medal of Technology to Cerf and his partner, Robert E. Kahn, for founding and developing the Internet. Cerf served as Senior Vice President at MCI from 1994 to 2005 and as Vice President of the Corporation for National Research Initiatives from 1986 to 1994 and as Vice President of MCI from 1982 to 1986. During his tenure from 1976-1982 with the U.S. Department of Defense's Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Cerf played a key role leading the development of Internet and Internet-related data packet and security technologies. Vint Cerf has served as chairman of the board of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) since November 2000 and has been a Visiting Scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory since 1998. Cerf served as founding president of the Internet Society (ISOC) from 1992-1995 and on the ISOC board until 2000. Cerf is a Fellow of the IEEE, ACM, and American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the International Engineering Consortium, the Computer History Museum and the National Academy of Engineering. Cerf is a recipient of numerous awards and commendations in connection with his work on the Internet. These include the Marconi Fellowship, Charles Stark Draper award of the National Academy of Engineering, the Prince of Asturias award for science and technology,...

— Freebase

Internet safety

Internet safety

Internet Safety, or Online Safety, is the knowledge of maximizing the user's personal safety and security risks on private information and property associated with using the internet, and the self-protection from computer crime in general. As the number internet users continue to grow worldwide, internet safety is a growing concern for both children and adults. Common concerns regarding safety of the internet include malicious users, websites and software and various types of obscene or offensive content. Several crimes can be committed on the Internet such as stalking, identity theft and more. Most social networking and chat sites have a page about safety. Numerous groups, and governments and organizations have expressed concerns and are dedicated to the safety of children using the Internet. Safer Internet Day is celebrated worldwide in February to raise awareness about internet safety. In the UK the Get Safe Online campaign has received sponsorship from government agency Serious Organized Crime Agency and major Internet companies such as Microsoft and eBay.

— Freebase

WildBlue

WildBlue

WildBlue's mission is to make affordable broadband internet access available to everyone. WildBlue delivers affordable two-way broadband Internet access via satellite to virtually any home and small business in small cities and rural America. WildBlue uses a 26-inch satellite minidish equipped with both a transmitter and receiver for two-way satellite connectivity to the Internet. WildBlue service does not require cable or phone lines. It is accessible to virtually every home and small business in the contiguous U.S., including the estimated 20-25 million homes and small offices that are not wired for terrestrial (DSL or cable modem) service. WildBlue's approach is based on next generation, two-way wireless Ka-band spot beam satellite technology, which lowers the cost of providing high bandwidth access to the Internet. WildBlue uses industry standard technology in its consumer premise equipment. The resulting low cost structure enables an affordably priced high-speed Internet service that is available across the country. WildBlue has attracted blue chip strategic investors including Intelsat, the National Rural Telecommunications Cooperative (NRTC), Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers, Liberty Media, and Telesat. In addition, the company has a seasoned management team of executives with vast experience in the Internet, satellite and cable industries. WildBlue's management and technical team is composed of terrestrial and satellite data communications experts from top companies including EchoStar, Tele-Communications Inc., Time Warner Cable, Loral, and Pac Bell. All have been brought together to serve the single objective of accelerating customer access to broadband. WildBlue's core service offers homes and small offices/home offices (SOHO) an Internet connection that is easy to use, reliable, always on, and more than 30 times faster than standard dial-up service (See our speed demo). WildBlue Internet service for consumers includes typical Internet Service Provider features (email, web space, etc.). It opens up a window to a world of rich content that is largely unavailable through dial-up service and largely unavailable in areas unserved by cable modem or DSL service. With WildBlue, for example, consumers can download a movie on demand, attend University courses hundreds of miles away or quickly email a family photo. Though these services are familiar to some, 20-25 million homes and small offices across the country cannot access high-speed internet services because the technology has not reached them. . . until now.

— Freebase

Internet Protocol

Internet Protocol

The Internet Protocol is the principal communications protocol in the Internet protocol suite for relaying datagrams across network boundaries. Its routing function enables internetworking, and essentially establishes the Internet. IP, as the primary protocol in the Internet layer of the Internet protocol suite, has the task of delivering packets from the source host to the destination host solely based on the IP addresses. For this purpose, IP defines datagram structures that encapsulate the data to be delivered. It also defines addressing methods that are used to label the datagram with source and destination information. Historically, IP was the connectionless datagram service in the original Transmission Control Program introduced by Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn in 1974; the other being the connection-oriented Transmission Control Protocol. The Internet protocol suite is therefore often referred to as TCP/IP. The first major version of IP, Internet Protocol Version 4, is the dominant protocol of the internet. Its successor is Internet Protocol Version 6.

— Freebase

Internet television

Internet television

Internet television is the digital distribution of television content via the Internet. Internet television is a general term that covers the delivery of television shows and other video content over the Internet by video streaming technology, typically by major traditional television broadcasters, as opposed to traditional systems like terrestrial, cable and satellite, although internet itself is received by terrestrial, cable or satellite methods. Internet television should not to be confused with Smart TV, IPTV or with Web TV. Smart TV refers to the TV set which has an inbuilt operating system. Internet Protocol television is one of the emerging Internet television technology standards for use by television broadcasters. Web television is a term used for programs created by a wide variety of companies and individuals for broadcast on Internet TV.

— Freebase

Internet safety

Internet safety

Internet safety or online safety or cyber safety or E-Safety is trying to be safe on the internet and is the knowledge of maximizing the user's personal safety and security risks to private information and property associated with using the internet, and the self-protection from computer crime. As the number of internet users continues to grow worldwide, internets, governments and organizations have expressed concerns about the safety of children using the Internet. Safer Internet Day is celebrated worldwide in February to raise awareness about internet safety. In the UK the Get Safe Online campaign has received sponsorship from government agency Serious Organized Crime Agency (SOCA) and major Internet companies such as Microsoft and eBay.

— Wikipedia

Internet Architecture Board

Internet Architecture Board

The Internet Architecture Board (IAB) is "a committee of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and an advisory body of the Internet Society (ISOC). Its responsibilities include architectural oversight of IETF activities, Internet Standards Process oversight and appeal, and the appointment of the Request for Comments (RFC) Editor. The IAB is also responsible for the management of the IETF protocol parameter registries."The body which eventually became the IAB was created originally by the United States Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency with the name Internet Configuration Control Board in 1979. Later, in 1983, the ICCB was reorganized by Dr. Barry Leiner, Vint Cerf's successor at DARPA, around a series of task forces considering different technical aspects of internetting. The re-organized group was named the Internet Activities Board. It finally became the Internet Architecture Board, under ISOC, during January 1992, as part of the Internet's transition from a U.S.-government entity to an international, public entity.

— Wikipedia

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An antonym for "pesky"
  • A. plaguey
  • B. pestilent
  • C. pettish
  • D. agreeable