Synonyms containing punctured neighborhood

We've found 1,174 synonyms:

Beylerbeyi

Beylerbeyi

Beylerbeyi is a neighborhood in the Üsküdar municipality of Istanbul, Turkey. It is located on the Asian shore of the Bosporus, to the north of the Bosphorus Bridge. It is bordered on the northeast by the neighborhood of Çengelköy, on the east by Kirazlıtepe, on the southeast by Küplüce, on the south by Burhaniye, on the southwest by Kuzguncuk, and on the northwest by the Bosporus. Directly across the Bosporus is the Ortaköy neighborhood of Istanbul's Beşiktaş municipality. The main landmark of the neighborhood is the Ottoman Beylerbeyi Palace. Near the palace are various pavilions or kiosks (köşkler), including the two small seaside pavilions (Yalı Köşkleri), imperial stables (Ahır Köşkü), a "sunken" pavilion (Serdab Köşkü or Mermer Köşk), and a yellow pavilion (Sarı Köşk). Another highly visible site within the neighborhood is the toll plaza on the Otoyol 1 highway for the Bosphorus Bridge. Some of the wealthiest people in Turkey own homes in the Beylerbeyi neighborhood, including several members of the Sabancı family.Schools in the neighborhood include the Naval Petty Officers Preparatory School (Deniz Astsubay Hazırlık Okulu), Beylerbeyi Hacı Sabancı High School, Beylerbeyi Elementary School, and Lütfi Ercin Elementary School. Cultural centers in the neighborhood include the Akbank Beylerbeyi Art Gallery and the Urart Art Center. Mosques in the neighborhood include the Bostancıbaşı Abdullah Agha Mosque (1581; also known as the İstavroz Mosque), Hamid-i Evvel (Abdul Hamid I) Mosque (1778; also known as the Beylerbeyi Mosque), and Cennet (Heaven) Mosque (1967).Cemeteries in the neighborhood include the Beylerbeyi Küplüce Cemetery. Tekkes in the neighborhood include the Badawi Tekke of Beylerbeyi.

— Wikipedia

Foothill

Foothill

Foothill in Salt Lake City, Utah is a relatively affluent and primarily residential neighborhood of Salt Lake City that lies at the base of the Wasatch Range and extends west to approximately 1500 East. Also sometimes referred to as "The East Bench", it is bordered on the north by the Federal Heights neighborhood and on the south by Interstate 80. This neighborhood becomes increasingly affluent moving from west to east. The neighborhood takes its name from the area's major traffic artery of Foothill Drive, which runs parallel to the base of the mountains and connects Interstate 80 with the University of Utah and downtown Salt Lake City. The University of Utah sits at the north end of this neighborhood. Points of interest include the Hogle Zoo, Red Butte Garden and Arboretum, This Is The Place Heritage Park, Fort Douglas Military Museum and the Foothill Village Shopping Center. Some notable residents and former residents include numerous authorities of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, LDS comedian John Bytheway, and billionaire philanthropist Jon Huntsman, Sr.. Foothill includes many distinct neighborhoods, including the Country Club, the eastern side of historic Sugar House, the Harvard-Yale Neighborhood, where many of the streets are named after schools, Oak Hills, Donner Park, University Village, St. Mary's Park, and the Devonshire Neighborhood near the "H-Rock", a large rock with an H painted on it that represents Highland High School.

— Freebase

Fauntleroy

Fauntleroy

Fauntleroy is a neighborhood in the southwest corner of Seattle, Washington. Part of West Seattle and situated on Puget Sound's Fauntleroy Cove, it faces Vashon Island, Blake Island, and the Kitsap Peninsula to the west. On sunny days, many locations in the neighborhood offer views of the Olympic Mountains, which are about 40 miles to the west. The neighborhood adjoins Lincoln Park to the north, Fauntlee Hills to the east, and Arbor Heights to the south. Within Fauntleroy is an area known as Endolyne. Fauntleroy is home to an eponymous Washington State Ferries terminal, providing service to Vashon Island and Southworth. The neighborhood, creek, and park all take their name from the cove, itself named by one Lt. George Davidson of the U. S. Coast Survey in 1857 in honor of the family of his fiancée, Ellinor Fauntleroy of Indiana. Fauntleroy's history was chronicled by Roy Morse and Richard Brown in Fauntleroy Legacy and by Clay Eals in West Side Story. Central to the Fauntleroy neighborhood are Fauntleroy Church, Fauntleroy YMCA, and The Hall at Fauntleroy, which now houses Fauntleroy Children's Center; a caterer, rental auditorium and meeting rooms; and several other business tenants.

— Freebase

Eastwick

Eastwick

Eastwick is a neighborhood in the Southwest section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. It is the southwesternmost neighborhood in the city, bordering Philadelphia International Airport and the city line with Delaware County, Pennsylvania at Cobbs Creek and Darby Creek. The Elmwood Park neighborhood borders it to the northeast. The neighborhood is named for Andrew M. Eastwick. It was largely rural until the 1920s when swampy land was dredged to create room for an airport and other large-scale uses within the city limits. Much of the original housing built before the 1950s lacked sewer service and other urban conveniences. Residents referred to the neighborhood as "The Meadows." Residents enjoyed the ability to have a rural lifestyle within city limits; nearby creeks provided recreation in the form of swimming, bathing, and fishing. An extensive crabbing home industry was based in The Meadows. Homes ranged from traditional single-family residences with lawns and gardens to traditional Philadelphia-style row houses; sometimes, these two housing styles appeared on the same block. Brick was the predominant material used in construction. Homes were built from the early 19th century until the Second World War caused a shortage of material for new construction.

— Freebase

Little Italy

Little Italy

Little Italy is a somewhat hilly neighborhood in Downtown San Diego, California that was originally a predominately Italian fishing neighborhood. It has since been gentrified and now Little Italy is a scenic neighborhood composed mostly of Italian restaurants, Italian retail shops, home design stores, art galleries, and residential units. Little Italy is one of the more active downtown neighborhoods and has frequent festivals and events including a weekly farmers market, also known as the Mercato. The neighborhood has low crime rates when compared with other neighborhoods in Downtown San Diego and is maintained by the Little Italy Neighborhood Association, which looks after trash collection, decorations, and special events.

— Freebase

Tremé

Tremé

Tremé; is a neighborhood of the city of New Orleans. "Tremé" is often rendered as Treme, historically the neighborhood is sometimes called by its more formal French names of Faubourg Tremé; it is listed in the New Orleans City Planning Districts as Tremé / Lafitte when including the Lafitte Projects. Originally known as "Back of Town," urban planners renamed the neighborhood "Faubourg Tremé" in an effort to revitalize the historic area. A subdistrict of the Mid-City District Area, its boundaries as defined by the City Planning Commission are Esplanade Avenue to the east, North Rampart Street to the south, St. Louis Street to the west and North Broad Street to the north. It is one of the oldest neighborhoods in the city, and early in the city's history was the main neighborhood of free people of color. Historically a racially mixed neighborhood, it remains an important center of the city's African-American and Créole culture, especially the modern brass band tradition.

— Freebase

Magliana

Magliana

The Magliana (Italian pronunciation: [maʎˈʎaːna]) neighborhood or ward is located on the South-West periphery of Rome, Italy along the Tiber River. The neighborhood dates back to the mid-1900s and is home to a diverse group of people of all ages and ethnicities. About 40,000 people reside in Magliana; housing is made up of mostly owner-occupied apartments in 7–8 story apartment buildings. The space is home to a good deal of economic activity that stretches from the main street, Via Della Magliana in the North-West of the neighborhood, to the South-East towards the Tiber River. However, businesses, activity, and buildings taper off as the neighborhood nears the river bank. Finally, between the built neighborhood and the river is a running trail along an area of farmland. The neighborhood is confined by the Tiber River on the East and Railroad tracks on the West edge. In the center of Magliana there are two main areas of congregation: Piazza Fabrizio De Andre and the Mercato Magliana (Magliana Market). The Piazza Fabrizio De Andre is consistently filled with people; in the morning the older generation can be seen sitting on the many benches or strolling through. In the afternoon through early evening it is usually filled with more than 60 children playing on the playground equipment. The Mercato Magliana is open in the morning and early afternoon and offers a wide variety of goods at discount prices.

— Wikipedia

Hemopneumothorax

Hemopneumothorax

Hemopneumothorax, or haemopneumothorax, is a medical term describing the combination of two conditions: pneumothorax, or air in the chest cavity, and hemothorax, or blood in the chest cavity. A haemothorax, pneumothorax or both can occur if the chest wall is punctured. To understand the ramifications of this it is important to have an understanding of the role of the pleural space. The pleural space is located anatomically between the visceral membrane, which is firmly attached to the lungs, and the parietal membrane which is firmly attached to the chest wall. The pleural space contains pleural fluid. This fluid holds the two membranes together by surface tension, much as a drop of water between two sheets of glass prevents them from separating. Because of this, when the intercostal muscles move the ribcage outward, the lungs are pulled out as well, dropping the pressure in the lungs and pulling air into the bronchi, when we 'breathe in'. The pleural space is maintained in a constant state of negative pressure. If the chest wall, and thus the pleural space, is punctured, blood, air or both can enter the pleural space. Air/blood rushes into the space in order to equalise the pressure with that of the atmosphere. As a result the fluid is disrupted and the two membranes no longer adhere to each other. When the rib cage moves out, it no longer pulls the lungs with it. Thus the lungs cannot expand, the pressure in the lungs never drops and no air is pulled into the bronchi. Respiration is not possible. The affected lung, which has a great deal of elastic tissue, shrivels in what is referred to as a collapsed lung.

— Freebase

Vernon

Vernon

A locale in the United States. A town in Connecticut; named for George Washington's home, Mount Vernon. A city, the county seat of Wilbarger County, Texas; named for Mount Vernon. A town in Wisconsin. A town and village in New York. A town in Vermont; named for Mount Vernon. A city, the county seat of Lamar County, Alabama. A village in Michigan; named for its township, itself for Mount Vernon. A neighborhood of Ottawa, Ontario. A city in Florida; named for Mount Vernon. A town in Utah; named for early settler Joseph Vernon. A city in Los Angeles County, California. A village in Illinois; named for railroad official William Vernon. A census-designated place in Arizona; named for American educator, minister and bishop William Tecumseh Vernon. A census-designated place in Colorado; named for a local minister. A neighborhood of Portland, Oregon. An unincorporated community in Delaware. An unincorporated community in Kansas. An unincorporated community in Jasper County, Mississippi. An unincorporated community in Madison County, Mississippi. An unincorporated community in Winston County, Mississippi. An unincorporated community in Oklahoma; named for William Tecumseh Vernon. An unincorporated community in West Virginia.

— Wiktionary

Sirkeci

Sirkeci

Sirkeci (pronounced [ˈsiɾkedʒi]) is a quarter in the Eminönü neighborhood of the Fatih district of the city of Istanbul, Turkey. The neighborhood borders to the North the mouth of the Golden Horn, to the West the neighborhood of Bahçekapı, to the East the Topkapi Palace area, and to the South the Cağaloğlu neighborhood. Sirkeci hosts Sirkeci Station, the Southeastern (thus "Oriental") long distance passenger train terminus in Europe for the Orient Express. The neighborhood consists mostly of commercial and tourist oriented uses. A combination of small shops, hans (larger workshops), offices intermingle with boutique hotels, traditional Turkish restaurants, Turkish and foreign-language bookstores, and tourist offices. In the Byzantine period, the area was known as Prosphorion (Ancient Greek: Προσφόριον).

— Wikipedia

Eiganes

Eiganes

Eiganes is a neighborhood (delområde) in the city of Stavanger in Rogaland county, Norway. It is located in the borough of Eiganes og Våland. The neighborhood has a population of 3,853, distributed over an area of 0.95 square kilometres (0.37 sq mi) between the Eiganes graveyard and the Vågen bay.Historically, Eiganes was considered to be the upper-class neighborhood for the city of Stavanger. Traditionally, only the wealthy families resided in this area. However, middle class people also reside in this neighborhood now and there are many modern apartments which are borettslags which is Norwegian cooperative housing. Many immigrants such as Poles, Italian, French, Romanian, and Asian people reside in this neighborhood.

— Wikipedia

Overlook

Overlook

Overlook is a neighborhood in the North section of Portland, Oregon on the east shore of the Willamette River. It borders University Park and Arbor Lodge on the north, Humboldt and Boise on the east, Eliot on the southeast, and Northwest Industrial and the Northwest District across the Willamette on the west. The Overlook Park Station, the N. Prescott St. Station and the N. Killingsworth Station on the MAX Yellow Line provide light rail service to the neighborhood. Overlook House serves as a community center. The Interstate Firehouse Cultural Center, next to Patton Park, features arts education, exhibits and theater. The neighborhood includes Swan Island, originally an island in the Willamette, but connected to the east bank by landfill in the 1920s. Swan Island was the site of Portland's first airport, Swan Island Airport, dedicated by Charles Lindbergh in 1927 and operating until the early 1940s when the island was converted to naval shipbuilding use for World War II as one of the Kaiser Shipyards. Swan Island is now an industrial area. This neighborhood is also occasionally referred to as Mocks Crest.

— Freebase

Stingaree, San Diego

Stingaree, San Diego

The Stingaree was a neighborhood of San Diego between the boom of the 1880s and the cleanup of 1916. The reason for the neighborhood's fame was its role as the home to the city's "undesirables", including prostitutes, pimps, drug dealers and gamblers. For similar reasons of societal exclusion, it was also the site of the city's first Chinatown. Additionally, the neighborhood was home to many other lower-class citizens, and was in the center of a wider blue-collar residential area encompassing much of the city south of Broadway. Though the name "Stingaree" refers primarily to the period before 1916, the neighborhood's character as a vice district lasted until its massive redevelopment in the 1980s.

— Freebase

Liberdade

Liberdade

Liberdade is the name of a district in the subprefecture of Sé, in São Paulo, Brazil. It is home to the largest Japanese community outside of Japan in the world and has been growing since the 1950s. Liberdade is São Paulo's own equivalent of Japantown in the USA. Significant populations of Chinese and Koreans also live in the district of Liberdade. It is served by the São Paulo Metro. The entrance to Liberdade is marked by a nine-meter tall red torii since 1974. This towering structure, situated on Rua Galvão Bueno, is a distinctive representation of the neighborhood. Liberdade was successfully connected to the São Paulo subway network in the 1970s, opening up this area to commerce like never before. Today, thousands of paulistanos flock to the public square in Liberdade every Sunday to purchase craft goods at the weekly fair. In January 2008, in order to celebrate 100 years of Japanese immigration to Brazil, a project to revitalize the quarter was approved by the mayor Gilberto Kassab. 40% of the restoration were for the visit of the prince Naruhito to São Paulo in June 2008. The Japanese presence in the neighborhood began in 1912. At this time, Japanese immigrants began to take up residence on the street of Count Sarzedas. This street had a steep slope that gave way to a running stream and swamp area. Basement apartments were numerous and inexpensive, and groups of people or families often lived together in the small rooms. However, the central location of the neighborhood meant immigrants could also be closer to work. As the number of immigrants in the neighborhood grew, so did commercial activity. Soon Japanese-owned inns, emporiums, restaurants, shops, and markets were popping up. These new commercial endeavors also become workplaces, which brought more immigrants to the area, and thus the "street of the Japanese" was formed.

— Freebase

Karantina

Karantina

La Quarantaine, which is colloquially referred to as Karantina and sometimes spelled Quarantina, is a predominantly low-income, mixed-use residential, commercial, and semi-industrial neighborhood in northeastern Beirut. The neighborhood lies east of the Port of Beirut, which also encircles it from the north, west of the Beirut River and north of the Charles Helou highway and the Achrafieh district of Beirut. The neighborhood gets its name from the French term, La Quarantaine, because it was the location where a lazaretto for travellers was built at the request of Ibrahim Pasha, the son of Muhammad Ali Pasha, the Governor of Egypt, who controlled Syria and Beirut in 1831. The lazaretto was to be managed by a committee made up of the Austrian, Danish, French, Greek, and Spanish consuls. In 1951, 1,300 Palestinian refugees were settled in the area. By the mid seventies, the neighborhood had become a favela of 27,000 people Industries in La Quarantaine used to be centered around the production of glass, furniture, tile and bricks, leather products, but many of these industries were replaced with the production of metal-based, cereal silos, tanneries and artisanal industries.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. combine
  • B. defuse
  • C. merge
  • D. aggregate