Synonyms containing regain the former state

We've found 111,947 synonyms:

Head

Head

hed, n. the uppermost or foremost part of an animal's body: the brain: the understanding: a chief or leader: the place of honour or command: the front or top of anything: an individual animal or person: a topic or chief point of a discourse: a title, heading: the source or spring: height of the source of water: highest point of anything: culmination: a cape: strength: a froth on beer, porter, &c., when poured into a glass.—v.t. to act as a head to, to lead or govern: to go in front of: to commence: to check: (naut.) to be contrary: (obs.) to behead.—v.i. to grow to a head: to originate: to go head foremost.—n. Head′ache, an internal pain in the head.—adj. Head′achy, afflicted with headaches.—ns. Head′band, a band or fillet for the head: the band at each end of a book: a thin slip of iron on the tympan of a printing-press; Head′-block, in a sawmill carriage, a cross-block on which the head of the log rests: a piece of wood in a carriage, connected with the spring and the perches, and joining the fore-gear and the hind-gear; Head′-board, a board placed at the head of anything, esp. a bedstead; Head′-boom, a jib-boom or a flying jib-boom; Head′bor′ough, an old term for the head of a borough, the chief of a frank pledge, tithing, or decennary; Head′-boy, the senior boy in a public school; Head′chair, a high-backed chair with a rest for the head; Head′-cheese, pork-cheese, brawn; Head′-chute, a canvas tube used to convey refuse matter from a ship's bows down to the water; Head′-cloth, a piece of cloth covering the head, wound round a turban, &c.; Head′-dress, an ornamental dress or covering for the head, worn by women.—p.adj. Head′ed, having a head: (Shak.) come to a head.—ns. Head′er, one who puts a head on something: a dive, head foremost, into water: a brick laid lengthwise along the thickness of a wall, serving as a bond: a heavy stone extending through the thickness of a wall; Head′-fast, a rope at the bows of a ship used to fasten it to a wharf, &c.; Head′-frame, the structure over a mine-shaft supporting the head-gear or winding machinery; Head′-gear, gear, covering, or ornament of the head; Head′-hunt′ing, the practice among the Dyaks of Borneo, &c., of making raids to procure human heads for trophies, &c.—adv. Head′ily.—ns. Head′iness; Head′ing, the act of furnishing with a head; that which stands at the head: material forming a head; Head′land, a point of land running out into the sea: a cape.—adj. Head′less, without a head.—ns. Head′-light, a light carried in front of a vessel, locomotive, or vehicle, as a signal, or for light; Head′-line, the line at the head or top of a page containing the folio or number of the page: (pl.) the sails and ropes next the yards (naut.).—adv.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tea dance

Tea dance

A tea dance, or thé dansant is a summer or autumn afternoon or early-evening dance from four to seven, sometimes preceded in the English countryside by a garden party. The function evolved from the concept of the afternoon tea, and J. Pettigrew traces its origin to the French colonization of Morocco. Books on Victorian Era etiquette such as Party-giving on Every Scale, included detailed instructions for hosting such gatherings. By 1880 it was noted "Afternoon dances are seldom given in London, but are a popular form of entertainment in the suburbs, in garrison-towns, watering-places, etc." Tea dances were given by Royal Navy officers aboard ships at various naval stations, the expenses shared by the captain and officers, as they were shared by colonels and officers at barrack dances in mess rooms ashore. The usual refreshments in 1880 were tea and coffee, ices, champagne-cup and claret-cup, fruit, sandwiches, cake and biscuits. Even after the introduction of the phonograph the expected feature was a live orchestra – often referred to as a palm court orchestra – or a small band playing light classical music. The types of dances performed during tea dances included Waltzes, Tangos and, by the late 1920s, The Charleston.

— Freebase

Love

Love

luv, n. fondness: an affection of the mind caused by that which delights: pre-eminent kindness: benevolence: reverential regard: devoted attachment to one of the opposite sex: the object of affection: the god of love, Cupid: (Shak.) a kindness, a favour done: nothing, in billiards, tennis, and some other games.—v.t. to be fond of: to regard with affection: to delight in with exclusive affection: to regard with benevolence.—v.i. to have the feeling of love.—adj. Lov′able, worthy of love: amiable.—ns. Love′-app′le, the fruit of the tomato; Love′bird, a genus of small birds of the parrot tribe, so called from their attachment to each other; Love′-brok′er (Shak.), a third person who carries messages and makes assignations between lovers; Love′-charm, a philtre; Love′-child, a bastard; Love′-day (Shak.), a day for settling disputes; Love′-fā′vour, something given to be worn in token of love; Love′-feast, a religious feast held periodically by certain sects of Christians in imitation of the love-feasts celebrated by the early Christians in connection with the Lord's-supper; Love′-feat, the gallant act of a lover; Love′-in-ī′dleness, the heart's-ease; Love′-juice, a concoction used to excite love; Love′-knot, an intricate knot, used as a token of love.—adj. Love′less, without love, tenderness, or kindness.—ns. Love′-lett′er, a letter of courtship; Love′-lies-bleed′ing, a species of the plant Amaranthus; Love′liness; Love′lock, a lock of hair hanging at the ear, worn by men of fashion in the reigns of Elizabeth and James I.—adj. Love′lorn, forsaken by one's love.—n. Love′lornness.adj. Love′ly, exciting love or admiration: amiable: pleasing: delightful.—adv. beautifully, delightfully.—ns. Love′-match, a marriage for love, not money; Love′-mong′ėr, one who deals in affairs of love; Love′-pō′tion, a philtre; Lov′er, one who loves, esp. one in love with person of the opposite sex, in the singular almost exclusively of the man: one who is fond of anything: (B.) a friend.—adjs. Lov′ered (Shak.), having a lover; Lov′erly, like a lover.—n. Love′-shaft, a dart of love from Cupid's bow.—adjs. Love′-sick, languishing with amorous desire; Love′some, lovely.—ns. Love′-suit (Shak.), courtship; Love′-tō′ken, a gift in evidence of love.—adj. Lov′ing, having love or kindness: affectionate: fond: expressing love.—ns.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Recover

Recover

rē-kuv′ėr, v.t. to get possession of again: to make up for: to retrieve: to cure: to revive: to bring back to any former state: to rescue: to obtain as compensation: to obtain for injury or debt: to reconcile.—v.i. to regain health: to regain any former state: (law) to obtain a judgment.—n. recovery: the forward movement in rowing, after one stroke to take another.—n. Recoverabil′ity, the state of being recoverable.—adj. Recov′erable, that may be recovered or regained: capable of being brought to a former condition.—ns. Recov′erableness, the state of being recoverable: capability of being recovered; Recoveree′, one against whom a judgment is obtained in common recovery; Recov′erer, one who recovers; Recov′eror, one who recovers a judgment in common recovery; Recov′ery, the act of recovering: the act of regaining anything lost: restoration to health or to any former state: the power of recovering anything: (law) a verdict giving right to the recovery of debts or costs. [O. Fr. recovrer—L. recuperārere-, again, and Sabine cuprus, good; some suggest cupĕre, to desire.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Recover

Recover

to regain health after sickness; to grow well; to be restored or cured; hence, to regain a former state or condition after misfortune, alarm, etc.; -- often followed by of or from; as, to recover from a state of poverty; to recover from fright

— Webster Dictionary

State

State

stāt, n. position: condition: situation: circumstances at any time: the whole body of people under one government: the public: the civil power: estate, one of the orders or classes of men forming the body politic (as nobles, clergy, commonalty): a body of men united by profession: rank, quality: pomp: dignity: style of living: stability, continuance: (pl.) the bodies constituting the legislature of a country: (obs.) a seat of dignity: a stage, condition, as of an etched or engraved plate at one particular stage of its progress.—adj. belonging to the state: public: royal: ceremonial: pompous: magnificent.—v.t. to set forth: to express the details of: to set down fully and formally: to narrate: to set in order: to settle.—adj. Stāt′able, capable of being stated.&mdasmdash;ns. State′-craft, the art of managing state affairs; State′-crim′inal, one who commits an offence against the state, as treason.—adj. Stāt′ed, settled: established: fixed: regular.—adv. Stāt′edly.—ns. State′-house, the building in which the legislature of a state holds its sittings; Stāte′liness.—adj. Stāte′ly, showing state or dignity: majestic: grand.—adv. majestically: (Milt.) loftily.—ns. Stāte′ment, the act of stating: that which is stated: a narrative or recital; State′-pā′per, an official paper or document relating to affairs of state; State′-pris′on; State′-pris′oner, a prisoner confined for offence against the state; State′-relig′ion, the establishment or endowment by the government of a country of some particular form of religion; State′room, a stately room in a palace or mansion: principal room in the cabin of a ship; States′-gen′eral, the name given to the representative body of the three orders (nobility, clergy, burghers) of the French kingdom; States′man, a man acquainted with the affairs of government: one skilled in government: one employed in public affairs: a politician: one who farms his own estate, a small landholder.—adj. States′man-like, like a statesman.—adv. States′manly, in a manner becoming a statesman.—n. States′manship.—State socialism, a scheme of government which would entrust to the state the carrying on of the great enterprises of private industry; States of the Church, the former temporal possessions of the popes. [O. Fr. estat (Fr. état)—L. status, from stāre, stātum, to stand.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Necrophobic

Necrophobic

Necrophobic is a Swedish death metal band formed in 1989 by drummer Joakim Sterner and guitarist David Parland. It is believed that the band named themselves after a Slayer song from the 1986 seminal album Reign in Blood. The pair played with a 'revolving door' line-up of musicians until the permanent addition of bassist Tobias Sidegård. This addition occurred prior to recording their debut 7" Single, The Call, in early 1992. With this line up and the addition of Anders Strokirk on vocals who replaced Stefan Harrvik the band entered Sunlight Studio in March 1993 and recorded the debut The Nocturnal Silence album. The band had previously worked with the Wild Rags label and store for its singles. Following the addition of second guitarist Martin Halfdahn, Necrophobic released a four-song extended play, Spawned by Evil, in 1996. This was a teaser for the full-length release, Darkside, which came out later that same year. This album featured a guest appearance by Jon Nödtveidt of Dissection on the song Nailing the Holy One. The Third Antichrist was released in fall 2000 through Black Mark Productions. A switch to Hammerheart Records led to Bloodhymns. In 2006, Necrophobic released Hrimthursum on Regain Records/Candlelight USA, and Death to All was issued in May 2009 and won the title of the Album Of The Month on Metallian.com Webzine. This album was the band's second for Regain Records. Necrophobic also released Satanic Blasphemies on Regain records, which is a compilation of their early material. The Slow Asphyxiation and Unholy Prophecies demos are featured, as well as The Call 7" EP.

— Freebase

Warren

Warren

A placename A town in New South Wales, Australia. A biogeographic region in southern Western Australia, Australia. A community in Manitoba, Canada; named for railroad executive A. E. Warren. A city, the county seat of Bradley County, Arkansas, United States. A former settlement near Fellows, Kern County, California, United States. A former settlement near Mojave, Kern County, California, United States. A town in Connecticut, United States; named for Joseph Warren. An unincorporated community in Idaho, United States. A village in Illinois, United States; named for Warren Burnett, the first white child born in the area. A town in Indiana, United States. An unincorporated community in Kentucky, United States. A town in Maine, United States; named for Joseph Warren. A town in Massachusetts, United States; named for Joseph Warren. A city in Michigan, United States; named for War of 1812 veteran Rev. Abel Warren. A city, the county seat of Marshall County, Minnesota, United States; named for railroad executive Charles Howard Warren. A city, the county seat of Trumbull County, Ohio, United States; named for surveyor Moses Warren. An unincorporated community in Missouri, United States; named for its township, itself for Joseph Warren. An unincorporated community in Montana, United States. A town in New Hampshire, United States; named for Peter Warren. A town in Herkimer County, New York, United States; named for Joseph Warren. A census-designated place in Oregon, United States; named for the town in Massachusetts. A city, the county seat of Warren County, Pennsylvania, United States; named for Revolutionary War hero Joseph Warren. A town in Rhode Island, United States; named for British naval officer Peter Warren. A former settlement in Texas, United States, and the former county seat of Fannin County. A census-designated place in Tyler County, Texas, United States. An unincorporated community in Utah, United States; named for Utah politician and Mormon leader Lewis Warren Shurtliff. A town in Vermont, United States; named for Joseph Warren. An unincorporated community in Virginia, United States. A village in Monroe County, Wisconsin, United States. A town in St. Croix County, Wisconsin, United States. A town in Waushara County, Wisconsin, United States.

— Wiktionary

Dietmar

Dietmar

Dietmar is a German forename. Dietmar I (archbishop of Salzburg), ruled 874 to 907 Dietmar von Aist, Minnesinger from a baronial family of Upper Austria, documented between 1140 and 1171 Dietmar Bär (born 1961), German actor Dietmar Bartsch (born 1958), German politician, former Bundesgeschäftsführer Dietmar Beiersdorfer (born 1963), former footballer and coach Dietmar Berchtold (born 1974), Austrian football midfielder Dietmar Bonnen (born 1958), German composer and pianist Dietmar Bruck (born 1944), former professional footballer Dietmar Burger (born 1968), Austrian darts player Dietmar Constantini (born 1955), former Austrian association football player and now head coach Dietmar Danner (born 1950), retired German footballer Dietmar Dath (born 1970),) is a German novelist Dietmar Demuth (born 1955), German former footballer who is now manager Dietmar Falkenberg, East German former bobsledder Dietmar Feichtinger (born 1961), Austrian architect in Paris Dietmar Hötger (born 1947), German judo athlete Dietmar Haaf (born 1967), former (West) German long jumper Dietmar Hamann (born 1973), German footballer Dietmar Hirsch (born 1971), retired German football player Dietmar Hopp (born 1940), German software entrepreneur Dietmar Jerke, East German bobsledder Dietmar Kühbauer (born 1971), former Austrian football midfielder Dietmar Kirves (born 1941), multimedia artist Dietmar Klinger (born 1958), retired German football player Dietmar Koszewski (born 1967), retired German hurdler Dietmar Lorenz (born 1950), East German judoka Dietmar Mögenburg (born 1961), former (West) German high jumper and Olympic gold medallist Dietmar Mürdter (born 1943), former professional German footballer Dietmar Meinel, German nordi combinited skier Dietmar Meisch (born 1959), retired East German race walker Dietmar Rosenthal (1899–1994), Russian linguist Dietmar Roth (born 1963), former German footballer Dietmar Rothermund, Germany historian best known for his research in the economy of India Dietmar Saupe (born 1954), fractal researcher and professor of computer science, University of Konstanz, Germany Dietmar Schönherr (1926–2014), Austrian film actor Dietmar Schacht (born 1962), former professional German footballer Dietmar Schauerhammer (born 1955), East German two-time Winter Olympic champion Dietmar Schiller, German rower Dietmar Schlöglmann (born 1955), Austrian sprint canoeist Dietmar Schmidt (born 1952), former East German handball player Dietmar Schwager (born 1940), retired German football coach and player Dietmar Schwarz (born 1947), German rower Dietmar Seyferth (born 1929), German-American chemist, Professor Emeritus of MIT. Dietmar Vestweber (born 1956), biochemist & cell biologist, founding director of the Max-Planck-Institute for Molecular Biomedicine in Münster, Germany Dietmar Wittmann, M.D., Ph.D., FACS is an academic surgeon specializing in complex abdominal surgery Dietmar Wuttke (born 1978), German former footballer Gert-Dietmar Klause (born 1945), a former East German cross-country skier

— Wikipedia

Maharashtra

Maharashtra

Maharashtra, is a state in the western region of India. It is the second most populous state after Uttar Pradesh and third largest state by area in India. Maharashtra is the wealthiest state in India, contributing 15% of the country's industrial output and 13.3% of its GDP. Maharashtra is bordered by the Arabian Sea to the west, Gujarat and the Union territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli to the northwest, Madhya Pradesh to the north and northeast, Chhattisgarh to the east, Karnataka to the south, Andhra Pradesh to the southeast and Goa to the southwest. The state covers an area of 307,731 km² or 9.84% of the total geographical area of India. Mumbai, the capital city of the state, is India's largest city and the financial capital of the nation. Nagpur is the second capital of the state. Marathi is the state's official language. Maharashtra is the world's second most populous first-level administrative country sub-division. Were it a nation in its own right, Maharashtra would be the world's tenth most populous country ahead of Mexico. In the 17th century, the Marathas rose under the leadership of Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj against the Mughals, who ruled a large part of India. By 1760, Maratha power had reached its zenith with a territory of over 250 million acres or one-third of the Indian sub-continent. After the Third Anglo-Maratha War, the empire ended and most of Maharashtra became part of Bombay State under a British Raj. After Indian independence, Samyukta Maharashtra Samiti demanded unification of all Marathi-speaking regions under one state. At that time, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar was of the opinion that linguistic reorganization of states should be done on a "One state – One language" principle and not on a "One language – One state" principle. He submitted a memorandum to the reorganization commission stating that a "single government can not administer such a huge state as United Maharashtra". The first state reorganization committee created the current Maharashtra state on 1 May 1960. The Marathi-speaking areas of Bombay State, Deccan states and Vidarbha united, under the agreement known as Nagpur Pact, to form the current state.

— Freebase

go back

recover, go back, recuperate

regain a former condition after a financial loss

— Princeton's WordNet

recover

recover, go back, recuperate

regain a former condition after a financial loss

— Princeton's WordNet

recuperate

recover, go back, recuperate

regain a former condition after a financial loss

— Princeton's WordNet

free state

free state

A political entity whose political status is less than that of a fully sovereign nation-state, as with the former Congo Free State and the former Irish Free State.

— Wiktionary

Use tax

Use tax

A use tax is a type of excise tax levied in the United States by numerous state governments. It is assessed upon tangible personal property purchased by a resident of the assessing state for use, storage, or consumption in that state, regardless of where the purchase took place. If a resident of a state makes a purchase within his home state, full sales tax is paid at the time of the transaction. The use tax applies when a resident of the assessing state purchases an item that is not subject to his home state's sales tax. Usually, this is due to out-of-state purchases, as well as ordering items through the mail, by phone, or over the Internet from other states. The use tax is typically assessed at the same rate as the sales tax that would have been owed had the same goods been purchased in the state of residence. For example, a resident of Massachusetts, with a 6.25% "sales and use tax" on certain goods and services, purchases non-exempt goods or services in New Hampshire for use, storage or other consumption in Massachusetts. Under New Hampshire law, the New Hampshire vendor collects no sales taxes on the goods, but the Massachusetts purchaser/user must still pay 6.25% of the sales price directly to the Department of Revenue in Massachusetts as a use tax. If the same goods are purchased in a US state that does collect sales tax for such goods at time of purchase, whatever taxes were paid by the purchaser to that state can be deducted from the 6.25% owed for subsequent use, storage or consumption in Massachusetts. With few exceptions, no state's vendors will charge the native state's sales tax on goods shipped out of state, meaning all goods ordered from out-of-state are essentially free of sales tax. The purchaser is therefore required to declare and pay the use tax to his home state on these ordered goods.

— Freebase

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A synonym of "dry"
  • A. juiceless
  • B. sodden
  • C. drippy
  • D. steamy