Synonyms containing require to be suffered

We've found 2,786 synonyms:

Cost

Cost

kost, v.t. to bring a certain price: to require to be laid out or suffered:—pa.t. and pa.p. cost.—n. what is laid out or suffered to obtain anything: (pl.) expenses of a lawsuit.—adj. Cost′-free, free of charge.—n. Cost′liness.—adv. Cost′ly, of great cost: high-priced: valuable.—Cost price, the price which the merchant pays.—Prime cost, the price of production, without regard to profit. [O. Fr. couster (Fr. coûter)—L. constāre, to stand at.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cost

Cost

to require to be borne or suffered; to cause

— Webster Dictionary

Arrival card

Arrival card

An arrival card, also known as an incoming passenger card, landing card or disembarkation card, is a legal document used by immigration authorities of many countries to obtain information about incoming passenger not provided by the passenger's passport (such as health, criminal record, where they will be staying, purpose of the visit, etc.) and to provide a record of a person's entry into the country. The card may also provide information on health and character requirements for non-citizens entering the country. Some countries require an arrival card for each incoming passenger, while others require one card per family unit, and some only require an arrival card for non-citizens only. Some countries, such as Singapore and Thailand, attach a departure card to the arrival card, which is retained in the alien's passport until their eventual departure. The arrival card can also be combined with a customs declaration, which some countries require incoming passengers to fill out separately. Some countries, such as Malaysia, do not require an arrival or departure card. The procedure of compiling information from immigration cards is no longer required by United States authorities following the introduction of the biometric recording system by the United States Customs and Border Protection. There is minimal cross-border formality between a number of countries, most notably those in the passport-free travel area of Europe's Schengen Zone. The US state of Hawaiʻi requires all visitors, even those on domestic flights, to fill out a card which is sent to the state's department of agriculture.The requirement to produce an arrival card is usually in addition to a requirement to produce a passport or other travel document, to obtain a visa, and sometimes complete a customs declaration.

— Wikipedia

Govern

Govern

to require to be in a particular case; as, a transitive verb governs a noun in the objective case; or to require (a particular case); as, a transitive verb governs the objective case

— Webster Dictionary

lightning mapper

lightning mapper

The component of such a system that gathers the required data, comprised of an interconnected network of electric field change sensors that measure the time of arrival of electric field pulses from the strokes in a lightning flash. 2D maps require 3 such sensors, 3D maps require 4.

— Wiktionary

Title insurance

Title insurance

Title insurance is a form of indemnity insurance predominantly found in the United States and Canada which insures against financial loss from defects in title to real property and from the invalidity or unenforceability of mortgage loans. Unlike some land registration systems in countries outside the United States, US states' recorders of deeds generally do not guarantee indefeasible title to those recorded titles. Title insurance will defend against a lawsuit attacking the title or reimburse the insured for the actual monetary loss incurred up to the dollar amount of insurance provided by the policy. The first title insurance company, the Law Property Assurance and Trust Society, was formed in Pennsylvania in 1853. Typically the real property interests insured are fee simple ownership or a mortgage. However, title insurance can be purchased to insure any interest in real property, including an easement, lease or life estate. There are two types of policies – owner and lender. Just as lenders require fire insurance and other types of insurance coverage to protect their investment, nearly all institutional lenders also require title insurance to protect their interest in the collateral of loans secured by real estate. Some mortgage lenders, especially non-institutional lenders, may not require title insurance. Buyers purchasing properties for cash or with a mortgage lender often want title insurance as well. A loan policy provides no coverage or benefit for the buyer/owner and so the decision to purchase an owner policy is independent of the lender's decision to require a loan policy. Title insurance is available in many other countries, such as Canada, Australia, the United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, Japan, China, Korea and throughout Europe. However, while a substantial number of properties located in these countries are insured by U.S. title insurers, they do not constitute a significant share of the real estate transactions in those countries. They also do not constitute a large share of U.S. title insurers' revenues. In many cases these are properties to be used for commercial purposes by U.S. companies doing business abroad, or properties financed by U.S lenders. The U.S. companies involved buy title insurance to obtain the security of a U.S. insurer backing up the evidence of title that they receive from the other country's land registration system, and payment of legal defense costs if the title is challenged.

— Wikipedia

Vivien Leigh

Vivien Leigh

Vivien Leigh, Lady Olivier was a British stage and film actress. She won two Best Actress Academy Awards for her performances as "southern belles": Scarlett O'Hara in Gone with the Wind and Blanche DuBois in the film version of A Streetcar Named Desire, a role she had also played on stage in London's West End. She won a Tony Award for her work in the Broadway version of Tovarich. After taking an education in drama school, Leigh appeared with small roles in four films in 1935, and progressed to the role of heroine in Fire Over England. Lauded for her beauty until 1950, Leigh felt that it sometimes prevented her from being taken seriously as an actress. Despite her fame as a screen actress, Leigh was primarily a stage performer. During her prolific 30-year stage career, she played roles ranging from the heroines of Noël Coward and George Bernard Shaw comedies to classic Shakespearean characters such as Ophelia, Cleopatra, Juliet and Lady Macbeth. Later in life, she played character roles in a few films. Leigh was greatly associated with her second husband, the well-known actor Laurence Olivier, to whom she was married from 1940 to 1960. Leigh and Olivier starred together in many films and stage productions, with Olivier often directing. For much of her adult life she suffered from bipolar disorder. She earned a reputation for being difficult to work with, and her career suffered periods of inactivity. She suffered recurrent bouts of chronic tuberculosis, first diagnosed in the mid-1940s, which ultimately claimed her life at the age of 53. In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Leigh as the sixteenth greatest female movie star of all time.

— Freebase

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge was an English poet, literary critic and philosopher who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He wrote the poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan, as well as the major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture. He coined many familiar words and phrases, including the celebrated suspension of disbelief. He was a major influence on Emerson, and American transcendentalism. Throughout his adult life, Coleridge suffered from crippling bouts of anxiety and depression; it has been speculated by some that he suffered from bipolar disorder, a condition not identified during his lifetime. Coleridge suffered from poor health that may have stemmed from a bout of rheumatic fever and other childhood illnesses. He was treated for these concerns with laudanum, which fostered a lifelong opium addiction.

— Freebase

bereaved

bereaved, bereaved person

a person who has suffered the death of someone they loved

— Princeton's WordNet

hurt

hurt, wounded

suffering from physical injury especially that suffered in battle

— Princeton's WordNet

lethe

Lethe, River Lethe

(Greek mythology) a river in Hades; the souls of the dead had to drink from it, which made them forget all they had done and suffered when they were alive

— Princeton's WordNet

river lethe

Lethe, River Lethe

(Greek mythology) a river in Hades; the souls of the dead had to drink from it, which made them forget all they had done and suffered when they were alive

— Princeton's WordNet

salvadoran capital

San Salvador, Salvadoran capital

the capital and largest city of El Salvador; has suffered from recurrent earthquakes

— Princeton's WordNet

san salvador

San Salvador, Salvadoran capital

the capital and largest city of El Salvador; has suffered from recurrent earthquakes

— Princeton's WordNet

vicarious

vicarious

suffered or done by one person as a substitute for another

— Princeton's WordNet

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A synonym of "kittenish"
  • A. sober
  • B. unplayful
  • C. frisky
  • D. serious