Synonyms containing revert war

We've found 11,448 synonyms:

War

War

wawr, n. a state of opposition or contest: a contest between states carried on by arms: open hostility: the profession of arms: (rare) army, warlike preparations, warlike outfit.—v.i. to make war: to contend: to fight:—pr.p. war′ring; pa.t. and pa.p. warred.—ns. War′-cry, a cry or signal used in war; War′-dance, a dance engaged in by some savage tribes before going to war; War′fāre, armed contest, military life; War′fārer; War′fāring; War′-horse, a charger, a horse used in battle.—adj. War′like, fond of war, pertaining to or threatening war: martial, military.—ns. War′likeness; War′man (rare), a warrior.—adj. War′-marked (Shak.), experienced in war.—ns. War′-mong′er (Spens.), a mercenary soldier; War′-off′ice, the English military bureau or department; War′-paint, paint applied to the face and person by savages, indicating that they are going to war: (slang) full-dress, equipment; War′-path, among the Red Indians, the path followed on a military expedition, the expedition itself; War′-proof (rare), fitness to be a soldier; War′rior, a soldier, a veteran:—fem. War′rioress (rare); War′-ship, a vessel for war; War′-song, a song sung by men about to fight: a song celebrating brave deeds in war; War′-tax, a tax levied for purposes of war; War′-thought (Shak.), martial deliberation.—adjs. War′-wast′ed, laid waste or ravaged by war; War′-wea′ried, -worn, wearied, worn, with military service—of a veteran.—ns. War′-whoop, a cry uttered by savages on going into battle; War′-wolf, a medieval military engine used in defending fortresses; Man′-of-war (see Man).—War Department, in Great Britain, a department of the state under a Cabinet Minister, the Secretary of State for War, assisted by a permanent and a parliamentary under-secretary, having control of everything connected with the army; War of Liberation, the war of independence carried on by Prussia, with the help of Russia and Great Britain, against Napoleon in 1813.—Declaration of war, that public announcement of war by a duly organised state or kingdom which is necessary to constitute an enemy; Declare war, to announce war publicly; Holy war (see Holy); Make war, to carry on hostilities; Napoleonic Wars, a general name for the wars of France dating from the campaigns of Napoleon in Italy (1796) to his overthrow in 1815; Private war, warfare waged between persons in their individual capacity, as by duelling, family feuds, &c.; Sacred Wars, in ancient Greek history, wars against states judged guilty of sacrilege by the Amphictyonic Council; Seven weeks' war, or Seven days' war, the Austro-Prussian war of 1866. [A.S. werre

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Revert

Revert

rē-vėrt′, v.t. to turn or drive back: to reverse.—v.i. to return: to fall back: to refer back: to return to the original owner or his heirs.—adjs. Rēver′tant (her.), flexed, bent twice at a sharp angle; Rēver′ted, reversed; Rēver′tible, that may revert or be reverted; Rēver′tive, tending to revert: changing: turning to the contrary.—adv. Rēver′tively, by way of reversion. [Fr.,—L. revertĕre.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Vietnam War

Vietnam War

The Vietnam War (Vietnamese: Chiến tranh Việt Nam), also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America (Vietnamese: Kháng chiến chống Mỹ) or simply the American War, was a conflict in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. It was the second of the Indochina Wars and was officially fought between North Vietnam and South Vietnam. North Vietnam was supported by the Soviet Union, China, and other communist allies; South Vietnam was supported by the United States, South Korea, the Philippines, Australia, Thailand and other anti-communist allies. The war, considered a Cold War-era proxy war by some, lasted 19 years, with direct U.S. involvement ending in 1973, and included the Laotian Civil War and the Cambodian Civil War, which ended with all three countries becoming communist in 1975. The conflict emerged from the First Indochina War against the communist-led Viet Minh. Most of the funding for the French war effort was provided by the U.S. After the French quit Indochina in 1954, the US assumed financial and military support for the South Vietnamese state. The Việt Cộng, also known as Front national de libération du Sud-Viêt Nam or NLF (the National Liberation Front), a South Vietnamese common front under the direction of North Vietnam, initiated a guerrilla war in the south. North Vietnam had also invaded Laos in the mid-1950s in support of insurgents, establishing the Ho Chi Minh Trail to supply and reinforce the Việt Cộng. U.S. involvement escalated under President John F. Kennedy through the MAAG program from just under a thousand military advisors in 1959 to 16,000 in 1963. By 1963, the North Vietnamese had sent 40,000 soldiers to fight in South Vietnam. North Vietnam was heavily backed by the USSR and the People's Republic of China. China also sent hundreds of PLA servicemen to North Vietnam to serve in air-defense and support roles.By 1964, there were 23,000 US advisors in South Vietnam. In August, the Gulf of Tonkin incident occurred, in which a U.S. destroyer was alleged to have clashed with North Vietnamese fast attack craft. in response, the U.S Congress passed the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, giving President Lyndon B. Johnson broad authorization to increase U.S. military presence. He ordered the deployment of combat units for the first time and increased troop levels to 184,000. Past this point, the People's Army of Vietnam (PAVN) (also known as the North Vietnamese Army or NVA) engaged in more conventional warfare with U.S and South Vietnamese forces. Every year onward, there was significant build-up of U.S forces, despite little progress. U.S Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, one of the principal architects of the war, began expressing doubts of victory by the end of 1966. U.S. and South Vietnam forces relied on air superiority and overwhelming firepower to conduct search and destroy operations, involving ground forces, artillery, and airstrikes. The U.S. also conducted a large-scale strategic bombing campaign against North Vietnam and Laos. The Tet Offensive of 1968 showed the lack of progress with these doctrines. With the VC and PAVN mounting large-scale urban offensives throughout 1968, U.S domestic support for the war began fading. The Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) expanded following a period of neglect after Tet and was modeled after U.S doctrine. The VC sustained heavy losses during the Tet Offensive and subsequent U.S.-ARVN operations in the rest of 1968, losing over 50,000 men. The CIA's Phoenix Program further degraded the VC's membership and capabilities. By the end of the year, the VC insurgents held almost no territory in South Vietnam, and their recruitment dropped by over 80% in 1969, signifying a drastic reduction in guerrilla operations, necessitating increased use of PAVN regular soldiers from the north. In 1969, North Vietnam declared a Provisional Revolutionary Government in South Vietnam in an attempt to give the reduced VC a more international stature, but the southern guerrillas from then on were sidelined as PAVN forces begun more conventional Combined arms warfare. Operations crossed national borders: Laos was invaded by North Vietnam early on, while Cambodia was used by North Vietnam as a supply route starting in 1967; the route through Cambodia began to be bombed by the U.S. in 1969, while the Laos route had been heavily bombed since 1964. The deposing of the monarch Norodom Sihanouk by the Cambodian National Assembly resulted in a PAVN invasion of the country at the request of the Khmer Rouge, escalating the Cambodian Civil War and resulting in a U.S.-RVN counter-invasion. In 1969, following the election of U.S President Richard Nixon, a policy of "Vietnamization" began, which saw the conflict fought by an expanded ARVN, with U.S. forces sidelined and increasingly demoralized by domestic opposition and reduced recruitment. U.S. ground forces had largely withdrawn by e

— Wikipedia

War film

War film

War film is a film genre concerned with warfare, typically about naval, air, or land battles, with combat scenes central to the drama. It has been strongly associated with the 20th century. The fateful nature of battle scenes means that war films often end with them. Themes explored include combat, survival and escape, camaraderie between soldiers, sacrifice, the futility and inhumanity of battle, the effects of war on society, and the moral and human issues raised by war. War films are often categorized by their milieu, such as the Korean War; the most popular subject is the Second World War. The stories told may be fiction, historical drama, or biographical. Critics have noted similarities between the Western and the war film. Nations such as China, Indonesia, Japan, and Russia have their own traditions of war film, centred on their own revolutionary wars but taking varied forms, from action and historical drama to wartime romance. Subgenres, not necessarily distinct, include anti-war, comedy, animated, propaganda, and documentary. There are similarly subgenres of the war film in specific theatres such as the Western Desert of North Africa, the Pacific in the Second World War, or Vietnam; and films set in specific domains of war, such as the infantry, the air, at sea, in submarines or at prisoner of war camps.

— Wikipedia

War economy

War economy

A war economy or wartime economy is the set of contingencies undertaken by a modern state to mobilize its economy for war production. Philippe Le Billon describes a war economy as a "system of producing, mobilizing and allocating resources to sustain the violence." Some measures taken include the increasing of Taylor rates as well as the introduction of resource allocation programs. Approaches to the reconfiguration of the economy differ from country to country. Many states increase the degree of planning in their economies during wars; in many cases this extends to rationing, and in some cases to conscription for civil defenses, such as the Women's Land Army and Bevin Boys in the United Kingdom during World War II. President Franklin D. Roosevelt stated if the Axis powers won, then "we would have to convert ourselves permanently into a militaristic power on the basis of war economy."During total war situations, certain buildings and positions are often seen as important targets by combatants. The Union blockade, Union General William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea during the American Civil War, and the strategic bombing of enemy cities and factories during World War II are all examples of total war.Concerning the side of aggregate demand, this concept has been linked to the concept of "military Keynesianism", in which the government's military budget stabilizes business cycles and fluctuations and/or is used to fight recessions. On the supply side, it has been observed that wars sometimes have the effect of accelerating progress of technology to such an extent that an economy is greatly strengthened after the war, especially if it has avoided the war-related destruction. This was the case, for example, with the United States in World War I and World War II. Some economists (such as Seymour Melman) argue, however, that the wasteful nature of much of military spending eventually can hurt technological progress. War is often used as a last ditch effort to prevent deteriorating economic conditions or currency crises, particularly by expanding services and employment in the military, and by simultaneously depopulating segments of the population to free up resources and restore the economic and social order.

— Wikipedia

fall from grace

fall from grace

revert back to bad behavior after a period of good behavior

— Princeton's WordNet

Hoopa

Hoopa

Hoopa (Japanese: フーパ Hoopa) is a dual-type Psychic/Ghost Mythical Pokémon introduced in Generation VI. While it is not known to evolve into or from any other Pokémon, it has an alternate form, which it changes into by using the Prison Bottle. Its default form, Hoopa Confined, will then become the Psychic/Dark Hoopa Unbound. Hoopa Unbound in the party will revert into Hoopa Confined if three days have passed since changing to Hoopa Unbound. Other circumstances may also cause it to revert. Hoopa Confined was officially revealed in the February 2015 issue of CoroCoro magazine. Hoopa Unbound was officially revealed in the May 2015 issue of CoroCoro magazine.

— Wikipedia

Man

Man

man, n. a human being: mankind: a grown-up male: a male attendant: one possessing a distinctively masculine character: a husband: a piece used in playing chess or draughts: a ship, as in man-of-war: a word of familiar address:—pl. Men.—v.t. to supply with men: to strengthen or fortify:—pr.p. man′ning; pa.t. and pa.p. manned.—ns. Man′-at-arms, a soldier; Man-child, a male child: a boy; Man′dom (rare), humanity, men collectively; Man′-eat′er, a cannibal: a tiger; Man′-en′gine, an elevator for raising and lowering men in some deep mines.—adj. Man′ful, having the qualities of a man: full of manliness: bold: courageous: noble-minded.—adv. Man′fully.—ns. Man′fulness; Man′-hole, a hole in a drain, cesspool, &c., large enough to admit a man, for the purpose of cleaning or repairing it; Man′hood, state of being a man: manly quality: human nature; Man′kind, the kind or race of man: the mass of human beings.—adj. Man′-like, having the appearance, characteristics, or qualities of a man.—n. Man′liness.—adj. Man′ly, becoming a man: brave: dignified: noble: pertaining to manhood: not childish or womanish.—n. Man′-mill′iner, a man engaged in millinery—often in contempt.—adjs. Man′-mind′ed (Tenn.), having the mind or qualities of a man; Man′nish, like a man: masculine: bold.—ns. Man′-of-war, a war-ship: (B.) a soldier; Man′-of-war's-man, a man who serves on board a war-ship; Man′-quell′er (Shak.), a man-killer, a murderer; Man′slaughter, the slaying of a man: (law) the killing of any one unlawfully, but without malice or forethought; Man′slayer, one who kills a man; Man′stealer, one who steals human beings, esp. to make slaves of them; Man′trap, a trap or machine for catching people who trespass.—Man about town, a fashionable idler, dangling about clubs, theatres, &c.; Man alive! an exclamation of surprise; Man Friday, a servile attendant, factotum—from Robinson Crusoe's man; Man in the moon, a fancied semblance of a man walking in the moon, with a bush near, and his dog behind him; Man of business, an agent or a lawyer; Man of (his) hands, a handy, clever fellow; Man of letters, a scholar and writer; Man of sin, the devil: Antichrist; Man of straw, a person put in the front of some business, but who is not really responsible; Man of the world, a person well accustomed to the ways and dealings of men. [A.S. mann; Ger. mann, Dut. man, L. masmans, a male, Sans. manu, a man.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Warp

Warp

wawrp, v.t. to turn: to twist out of shape: to turn from the right course: to pervert: to move a vessel by hauling on warps or ropes attached to buoys, other ships, anchors, &c.: to improve land by distributing on it, by means of embankments, canals, flood-gates, &c., the alluvial mud brought down by rivers: (rare) to change.—v.i. to be twisted out of a straight direction: to bend: to swerve: to move with a bending motion.—n. alluvial sediment: the threads stretched out lengthwise in a loom to be crossed by a woof: a rope used in towing.—adj. Warped, twisted by shrinking: perverted.—ns. War′per; War′ping; War′ping-bank, a bank to retain water in the process of warping land; War′ping-hook, a ropemakers' hook used in twisting rope-yarns; War′ping-post, a post in a rope-walk, used in warping rope-yarn. [A.S. weorpan, werpan; Ger. werfen, to cast; conn. with Ice. varpa, to throw—varp, a casting, a throw with a net.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

War song

War song

A war song is a musical composition that relates to war, or a society's attitudes towards war. They may be pro-war, anti-war, or simply a description of everyday life during war times. It is possible to classify these songs by historical, conflict: "First World War songs", "Second World War songs", "Vietnam War songs", and so on. There is also a miscellaneous category of recruiting songs, anti-pacifist songs, complaints about mess rations, excessive drilling and so on. Many national anthems are either a call to arms, or a celebration of military victories and past glories. There were a handful of anti-war songs before 1939, but this category has grown enormously since the start of the Vietnam War. On the other hand, new songs that are pro-war are becoming less common. Some national anthems have been adapted to be purely instrumental, or less bellicose in sentiment.

— Wikipedia

World War II

World War II

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. It involved the vast majority of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most widespread war in history, with more than 100 million people serving in military units from over 30 different countries. In a state of "total war", the major participants placed their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities at the service of the war effort, erasing the distinction between civilian and military resources. Marked by mass deaths of civilians, including the Holocaust and the only use of nuclear weapons in warfare, it resulted in 50 million to over 75 million fatalities. These deaths make World War II likely the deadliest conflict in human history. The Empire of Japan aimed to dominate East Asia and was already at war with the Republic of China in 1937, but the world war is generally said to have begun on 1 September 1939 with the invasion of Poland by Germany and subsequent declarations of war on Germany by France and the United Kingdom. From late 1939 to early 1941, in a series of campaigns and treaties, Germany formed the Axis alliance with Italy, conquering or subduing much of continental Europe. Following the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, Germany and the Soviet Union partitioned and annexed territories between themselves of their European neighbours, including Poland and the Baltic states. The United Kingdom and the other members of the British Commonwealth were the only major Allied forces continuing the fight against the Axis, with battles taking place in North Africa as well as the long-running Battle of the Atlantic. In June 1941, the European Axis launched an invasion of the Soviet Union, giving a start to the largest land theatre of war in history, which tied down the major part of the Axis' military forces for the rest of the war. In December 1941, Japan joined the Axis, attacked the United States and European territories in the Pacific Ocean, and quickly conquered much of the Western Pacific.

— Freebase

Gulf War

Gulf War

The Gulf War, codenamed Operation Desert Storm was a war waged by a U.N.-authorized Coalition force from 34 nations led by the United States, against Iraq in response to Iraq's invasion and annexation of Kuwait. The war is also known under other names, such as the Persian Gulf War, First Gulf War, Gulf War I, or the First Iraq War, before the term "Iraq War" became identified instead with the 2003 Iraq War. Kuwait's invasion by Iraqi troops that began 2 August 1990 was met with international condemnation, and brought immediate economic sanctions against Iraq by members of the U.N. Security Council. U.S. President George H. W. Bush deployed U.S. forces into Saudi Arabia, and urged other countries to send their own forces to the scene. An array of nations joined the Coalition. The great majority of the Coalition's military forces were from the U.S., with Saudi Arabia, the United Kingdom and Egypt as leading contributors, in that order. Saudi Arabia paid around US$36 billion of the US$60 billion cost. The war was marked by the beginning of live news on the front lines of the fight, with the primacy of the U.S. network CNN. The war has also earned the nickname Video Game War after the daily broadcast images on board the U.S. bombers during Operation Desert Storm.

— Freebase

Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician, army officer, and writer. He was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945, when he led Britain to victory in the Second World War, and again from 1951 to 1955. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as a Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and imperialist, for the last of his career he was a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but from 1904 to 1924 was a member of the Liberal Party. Of mixed English and American parentage, Churchill was born in Oxfordshire to a wealthy, aristocratic family. Joining the British Army, he saw action in British India, the Anglo–Sudan War, and the Second Boer War, gaining fame as a war correspondent and writing books about his campaigns. Elected an MP in 1900, initially as a Conservative, he defected to the Liberals in 1904. In H. H. Asquith's Liberal government, Churchill served as President of the Board of Trade, Home Secretary, and First Lord of the Admiralty, championing prison reform and workers' social security. During the First World War, he oversaw the Gallipoli Campaign; after it proved a disaster, he resigned from government and served in the Royal Scots Fusiliers on the Western Front. In 1917, he returned to government under David Lloyd George as Minister of Munitions, then as Secretary of State for War and Air, and finally for the Colonies, overseeing the Anglo-Irish Treaty and Britain's Middle East policy. After two years out of Parliament, he served as Chancellor of the Exchequer in Stanley Baldwin's Conservative government, returning the pound sterling in 1925 to the gold standard at its pre-war parity, a move widely seen as creating deflationary pressure on the UK economy. Out of office during the 1930s, Churchill took the lead in calling for British rearmament to counter the growing threat from Nazi Germany. At the outbreak of the Second World War he was re-appointed First Lord of the Admiralty. In 1940 he became prime minister, replacing Neville Chamberlain. Churchill oversaw British involvement in the Allied war effort against Germany and the Axis powers, resulting in victory in 1945. His wartime leadership was widely praised, although acts like the Bombing of Dresden and his wartime response to the Bengal famine generated controversy. After the Conservatives' defeat in the 1945 general election, he became Leader of the Opposition. Amid the developing Cold War with the Soviet Union, he publicly warned of an "iron curtain" of Soviet influence in Europe and promoted European unity. Re-elected Prime Minister in 1951, his second term was preoccupied with foreign affairs, including the Malayan Emergency, Mau Mau Uprising, Korean War, and a UK-backed Iranian coup. Domestically his government emphasised house-building and developed a nuclear weapon. In declining health, Churchill resigned as prime minister in 1955, although he remained an MP until 1964. Upon his death in 1965, he was given a state funeral. Widely considered one of the 20th century's most significant figures, Churchill remains popular in the UK and Western world, where he is seen as a victorious wartime leader who played an important role in defending Europe's liberal democracy from the spread of fascism. Also praised as a social reformer and writer, among his many awards was the Nobel Prize in Literature. Conversely, his imperialist views and comments on race, as well as his sanctioning of human rights abuses in the suppression of anti-imperialist movements seeking independence from the British Empire, have generated considerable controversy.

— Wikipedia

Preemptive war

Preemptive war

A preemptive war is a war that is commenced in an attempt to repel or defeat a perceived imminent offensive or invasion, or to gain a strategic advantage in an impending (allegedly unavoidable) war shortly before that attack materializes. It is a war that preemptively 'breaks the peace'. The term 'preemptive war' is sometimes confused with the term 'preventive war'. The difference is that a preventive war is launched to destroy the potential threat of the targeted party, when an attack by that party is not imminent or known to be planned. A preemptive war is launched in anticipation of immediate aggression by another party. Most contemporary scholarship equates preventive war with aggression, and therefore argues that it is illegitimate. The waging of a preemptive war has less stigma attached than does the waging of a preventive war.The initiation of armed conflict: that is being the first to 'break the peace' when no 'armed attack' has yet occurred, is not permitted by the UN Charter, unless authorized by the UN Security Council as an enforcement action. Some authors have claimed that when a presumed adversary first appears to be beginning confirmable preparations for a possible future attack, but has not yet actually attacked, that the attack has in fact 'already begun', however this opinion has not been upheld by the UN.

— Wikipedia

War

War

War is an organised and often prolonged conflict that is carried out by states and/or non-state actors. It is characterised by extreme violence, social disruption, and economic destruction. War should be understood as an actual, intentional and widespread armed conflict between political communities, and therefore is defined as a form of political violence or intervention. The set of techniques used by a group to carry out war is known as warfare. An absence of war is usually called peace. In 2003, Nobel Laureate Richard E. Smalley identified war as the sixth biggest problem facing the society of mankind for the next fifty years. In the 1832 treatise On War, Prussian military general and theoretician Carl von Clausewitz defined war as follows: "War is thus an act of force to compel our enemy to do our will." While some scholars see warfare as an inescapable and integral aspect of human nature, others argue that it is only inevitable under certain socio-cultural or ecological circumstances. Some scholars argue that the practice of war is not linked to any single type of political organization or society. Rather, as discussed by John Keegan in his History of Warfare, war is a universal phenomenon whose form and scope is defined by the society that wages it. Another argument suggests that since there are human societies in which warfare does not exist, humans may not be naturally disposed for warfare, which emerges under particular circumstances. The ever changing technologies and potentials of war extend along a historical continuum. At the one end lies the endemic warfare of the Paleolithic with its stones and clubs, and the naturally limited loss of life associated with the use of such weapons. Found at the other end of this continuum is nuclear warfare, along with the recently developed possible outcome of its use, namely the potential risk of the complete extinction of the human species.

— Freebase

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

»
Which of the following terms is not a synonym for "tolerable"?
  • A. passable
  • B. adequate
  • C. constructive
  • D. fair to middling