Synonyms containing roulette russe

We've found 44 synonyms:

André Eglevsky

André Eglevsky

André Eglevsky was a Russian-born American ballet dancer and teacher. Eglevsky was born in Moscow, but was taken to live in France when he was eight, his mother having decided that his talent as a dancer demanded that he be properly trained. He studied ballet in Nice with Maria Nevelskaya, Lubov Egorova, Mathilde Kschessinska, Alexandre Volinine, Olga Preobrajenska, and Leon Woizikowski in Paris, Nicholas Legat in London, and the School of American Ballet in New York City. At the age of fourteen he joined Colonel W. de Basil's Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, and after six months was dancing leading roles in such ballets as Swan Lake, Les Sylphides, and Les Présages. In 1935 he joined Igor Youskevitch as the company's Premier Danseur, and a year later joined René Blum's Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. Eglevsky travelled to the United States in 1937, and was premier danseur in George Balanchine's American Ballet until 1938. He also danced at the Radio City Music Hall and in the Broadway musical Great Lady. After becoming an American citizen, in 1939 he rejoined the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, staying there until 1942. For the following four years he danced with the Ballet Theatre, as well as dancing as a guest star with Léonide Massine's Ballet Russe Highlights in 1944 and 1945. In the late 1930s he married the ballerina Leda Anchutina. His daughter, Marina Eglevsky, is also a ballerina.

— Freebase

Roulette russe

Roulette russe

Roulette russe (Russian roulette) is the second album by French rocker Alain Bashung, issued in 1979 on Philips Records. The album was reissued the following years with a couple of songs dropped and the two songs from his breakthrough single, Gaby oh Gaby, added.

— Wikipedia

The Deer Hunter

The Deer Hunter

The Deer Hunter is a 1978 American epic war drama film co-written and directed by Michael Cimino about a trio of steelworkers whose lives were changed forever after they fought in the Vietnam War. The three soldiers are played by Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken, and John Savage, with John Cazale (in his final role), Meryl Streep, and George Dzundza playing supporting roles. The story takes place in Clairton, Pennsylvania, a small working class town on the Monongahela River south of Pittsburgh, and in Vietnam. The film was based in part on an unproduced screenplay called The Man Who Came to Play by Louis Garfinkle and Quinn K. Redeker, about Las Vegas and Russian roulette. Producer Michael Deeley, who bought the script, hired writer/director Michael Cimino who, with Deric Washburn, rewrote the script, taking the Russian roulette element and placing it in the Vietnam War. The film went over-budget and over-schedule, and ended up costing $15 million. The scenes depicting Russian roulette were highly controversial after the film's release. EMI Films, who produced the film, released the film internationally while Universal Pictures handled its distribution in North America. The film received critical acclaim from critics and audiences, with praise going towards Cimino's direction, the performances of its cast, particularly from De Niro, Walken, and Streep, screenplay, realistic themes and tones, and cinematography. It was also successful at the box office, grossing $49 million. At the 51st Academy Awards, it was nominated for nine Academy Awards, and won five including Best Picture, Best Director for Cimino, Best Supporting Actor for Walken, Best Sound, and Best Film Editing. The film marked Meryl Streep's first Academy Award nomination (for Best Supporting Actress); she would go on to become the most nominated actor in history. Considered one of the best films ever made, it was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress in 1996 as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant", and was named the 53rd greatest American film of all time by the American Film Institute in 2007 in their 10th Anniversary Edition of the AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies list.

— Wikipedia

Russian roulette

Russian roulette

Russian roulette is a potentially lethal game of chance in which a player places a single round in a revolver, spins the cylinder, places the muzzle against their head, and pulls the trigger. "Russian" refers to the supposed country of origin, and roulette to the element of risk-taking and the spinning of the revolver's cylinder being reminiscent of spinning a roulette wheel. Because only one chamber is loaded, the player has only one in n chance of hitting the loaded chamber, where n is the total number of chambers in the cylinder. So, for instance, in a revolver that holds six rounds, the chance is one in six; for a revolver that holds five, the chance - or risk - is one in five. Whilst the above calculation of the odds is correct in a purely mathematical sense, it does not take physics into account: A properly maintained and lubricated weapon with a single round in the cylinder will still be subject to the laws of gravity, meaning the full chamber which weighs more will usually end up near the bottom of the cylinder, altering the odds further in the player's favour - but only if the cylinder is allowed to come to a complete stop before the cylinder is relatched.

— Freebase

Limaçon

Limaçon

In geometry, a limaçon or limacon, also known as a limaçon of Pascal, is defined as a roulette formed when a circle rolls around the outside of a circle of equal radius. It can also be defined as the roulette formed when a circle rolls around a circle with half its radius so that the smaller circle is inside the larger circle. Thus, they belong to the family of curves called centered trochoids; more specifically, they are epitrochoids. The cardioid is the special case in which the point generating the roulette lies on the rolling circle; the resulting curve has a cusp. The term derives from the French word limaçon, which refers to small snails. Depending on the position of the point generating the curve, it may have inner and outer loops, it may be heart-shaped, or it may be oval. A limaçon is a bicircular rational plane algebraic curve of degree 4.

— Freebase

Bar billiards

Bar billiards

Bar Billiards is a form of billiards which is often thought to be based on the traditional game of bagatelle. It actually developed from the earlier French/Belgian game billard russe, with supposedly Russian origins. Bar billiards in its current form started in the UK in the 1930s when an Englishman David Gill saw Billiard Russe being played in Belgium and persuaded the Jelkes company of Holloway Road in London to make a similar table. It is a traditional game played in leagues in Sussex, Berkshire, Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Surrey, Kent, Cambridgeshire, Hampshire, Norfolk and Northamptonshire. These counties comprise the All England Bar Billiards Association. There are also leagues in Guernsey and Jersey. Tables were also made by Sams, Riley, Burroughs & Watts and Clare. The standard "league" tables have a playing surface approximately 32 inches wide. Sams also made a narrower version with a 28 inch width playing surface.

— Freebase

Game of chance

Game of chance

A game of chance is a game whose outcome is strongly influenced by some randomizing device, and upon which contestants may choose to wager money or anything of monetary value. Common devices used include dice, spinning tops, playing cards, roulette wheels or numbered balls drawn from a container. A game of chance may have some skill element to it, however, chance generally plays a greater role in determining the outcome than skill. A game of skill, on the other hand, also has an element of chance, but with skill playing a greater role in determining the outcome. Any game of chance that involves anything of monetary value is gambling. Gambling is known in nearly all human societies, even though many have passed laws restricting it. Early people used the knucklebones of sheep as dice. Some people develop a psychological addiction to gambling, and will risk even food and shelter to continue. Some games of chance may also involve a certain degree of skill. This is especially true where the player or players have decisions to make based upon previous or incomplete knowledge, such as blackjack. In other games like roulette and punto banco baccarat the player may only choose the amount of bet and the thing he/she wants to bet on, the rest is up to chance, therefore these games are still considered games of chance with small amount of skills required. The distinction between 'chance' and 'skill' is relevant as in some countries chance games are illegal or at least regulated, where skill games are not.

— Freebase

Trochoid

Trochoid

the curve described by any point in a wheel rolling on a line; a cycloid; a roulette; in general, the curve described by any point fixedly connected with a moving curve while the moving curve rolls without slipping on a second fixed curve, the curves all being in one plane. Cycloids, epicycloids, hypocycloids, cardioids, etc., are all trochoids

— Webster Dictionary

Monte Carlo fallacy

Monte Carlo fallacy

the fallacy, most often believed by gamblers, that a past random event influences the outcome of a future random event, that is, that a run of even numbers at roulette means that there is a greater chance of an odd number next time.

— Wiktionary

roulettelike

roulettelike

Resembling or characteristic of the gambling game of roulette.

— Wiktionary

roulettes

roulettes

Plural form of roulette.

— Wiktionary

roulette ball

roulette ball

the ball used to play roulette

— Princeton's WordNet

roulette wheel

roulette wheel, wheel

game equipment consisting of a wheel with slots that is used for gambling; the wheel rotates horizontally and players bet on which slot the roulette ball will stop in

— Princeton's WordNet

wheel

roulette wheel, wheel

game equipment consisting of a wheel with slots that is used for gambling; the wheel rotates horizontally and players bet on which slot the roulette ball will stop in

— Princeton's WordNet

Charlotte

Charlotte

shär′lot, n. a dish of apple marmalade covered with crumbs of toast.—Charlotte russe, a custard enclosed in a kind of sponge-cake.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following terms is not a synonym of "shopsoiled"?
  • A. well-worn
  • B. new
  • C. hackneyed
  • D. commonplace