Synonyms containing sa'idi arabic

We've found 2,661 synonyms:

Sa'idi Arabic

Sa'idi Arabic

Sa'idi Arabic is the variety of Arabic spoken by Sa'idis south of Cairo, Egypt to the border of Sudan. It shares linguistic features both with Egyptian Arabic, as well as Sudanese Arabic. Dialects include Middle and Upper Egyptian Arabic. Speakers of Egyptian Arabic do not always understand more conservative varieties of Sa'idi Arabic. Sa'idi Arabic carries little prestige nationally though it continues to be widely spoken, including in the north by rural migrants who have partially adapted to Egyptian Arabic. For example, the Sa'idi genitive exponent is usually replaced with Egyptian bitāʿ, but the realization of as is retained. Second and third-generation Sa'idi migrants are monolingual in Egyptian Arabic, but maintain cultural and family ties to the south.

— Freebase

Yamli

Yamli

Yamli.com let’s user easily type and search in Arabic through it’s Smart Arabic Keyboard, and Arabic Search technology . The Smart Arabic Keyboard allows users to type Arabic without an Arabic keyboard from within their web browser. This technology is based on a real-time transliteration engine which converts words typed with Latin characters to their closest Arabic equivalent. Yamli Arabic Search is a search engine focused on providing more relevant search results for an Arabic query by expanding it to its most frequently used Latin representations.

— CrunchBase

Ikirun

Ikirun

Ikirun is a town in Osun State, Nigeria. It is the headquarters of Ifelodun Local Government Area. IKIRUN HISTORICAL CITY IN YORUBALAND Ikirun, is an historical city that derived its name from the founder of the town called Akinorun. Akinorun is a hunter who founded Ikirun. GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION Ikirun is situated in the north-eastern part of Osun state of Nigeria in Osun northeast division Ikirun is located within latitude 7 degree 50 feet north of Equator and longitude 4 degree 40 feet east of Greenwich meridian. The town is located in a valley surrounded by 2 hills. Obagun/Gbogi hill to north and Aafo hill to the south and Alaroka and Idi-olo mountain to the east. Ikirun is centrally located in Osun north-east division of Osun state. It is bounded on the north by Inisa town in Odo-otin local government area. On the south by Osogbo, the Osun state capital. To the east by Iragbiji town in Boripe local government council. And on the west by Eko-Ende town also in Ifelodun local government council. POPULATION: It is estimated that the population of Ikirun was about 60,826 (according to National Population Census, Ikirun). HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES Akinorun had two sons, Akinbiyi and Akinyemi who ruled and died at the original site, Igbo Irele. One of other Akinoruns children Oba-Ara, Gboleru and Adedeji moved out of the original site at Igbo Irele because there was shortage of water. Oba-Ara became the first ruler of the present Ikirun while Basetan became Eesa and head of the traditional chiefs and kingmakers in the town. In recognition of the original role of Basetan as Oba-Aras host, every Oba soon after his appointment is obliged to spend a period of time, previously three months but now cut to three days with Eesa. Just as Ikirun is derived from Akinorun so does the title of Oba Akinrun takes its origin from the same name. NAMES OF PAST OBAS (KINGS) IN IKIRUN As mentioned earlier, the former settlement at Igbo-Irele was short lived. However, since the birth of permanent and present site of the town, fifteen Akinrun has reigned over Ikirun town. They are as follows: TRADITIONAL CHIEFS OF IKIRUN The traditional chiefs of Ikirun are as follows: 1. Chief Eesa he is the head of king makers 2. Chief Odofin 3. Chief Ojomu 4. Chief Elemo 5. Chief Aro 6. Chief Jagun 7. Chief Baale Okeba 8. Chief Olukotun 9. Chief Aogun Ogerende WOMEN TITLE HOLDERS Women also hold traditional titles in Ikirun such as Iyalode of Ikirun, Otun Iyalode, Osi Iyalode, Ekerin Iyalode and Iyaloja. NAMES OF COMPOUNDS IN IKIRUN 1. Ile Adu 2. Alagbede 3. Aare Olugasa 4. Agbojari 5. Alagbede pon 6. Awodi Ogun 7. Ile Aloba 8. Alubata Agboja 9. Amola 10. Abitimo 11. Aromokanla 12. Aare-Onibon 13. Akan-an 14. Aare 15. Alaran 16. Abojo 17. Apanpa 18. Amugangan 19. Abudu 20. Agunjin 21. Agbere 22. Asuramu 23. Alataya 24. Akeremewe 25. Anlamole 26. Agbaleke 27. Alawo 28. Adeyeri 29. Akio 30.Agbopa 31. Aboke 32. Afonpe 33. Are-Ago 34. Aiwosi 35. Aje- Oba 36. Ajenbe 37. Agbori oko 38. Alagbaa 39. Alawe 40. Agba-akin 41. Aladi 42. Ajele- Ilorin 43. Aloba 44. Ajiyalu 45. Ajibesin 46. Asalu 47. Abidogun 48. Aro 49. Aresa 50. Aworo-Irele 51. Amolese 52. Arobo 53. Ajele 54. Ajimosun 55. Alalufaa (Isale Aafo) 56. Atere 57. Ajakaye Onipele 58. Ajana 59. Asaba 60. Ajele Okeba 61. Ago Okeba 62. Ajisefinni 63. Alufa Akanbi 64. Adedeji 65. Alabi 66. Aniyeye 67. Agunlo 68. Aliyu 69. Aborisade 70. Agbon 71. Ayara 72. Baale- Enle 73. Baba Osogbo 74. Orisayo 75. Balogun 76. Baale Gbenagbena 77. Baale Onilu 78. Baale Ponja Erintunde 79. Saba 80. Balogun Kojo 81. Baale Oke Aafo 82. Balogun Makinde 83. Baba Isale 84. Balogun Imole 85. Baba Oloya 86. Baale Arabanbi 87. Baale Babatola 88. Baale Soyan 89. Balogun Okeba 90. Bada 91. Baale Aludundun Ayan 92. Baale Oya Omo Onira 93. Eesa 94. Eesade 95. Enju 96. Egunjobi 97. Elejin 98. Elemo Abioye (Oke Aafo) 99. Elemo Ago 100. Efun Akun 101. Ebipologba 102. Elemoso Agan 103. Esu Agiriemu 104. Elemoso Ogun 105. Esubiyi 106. Eesorun Okeba 107. Elega 108. Eesa Olorombo 109. Gesinde 110. Gbalade 111. Gbenagbena 112. Gbesi 113. Iya Oba 114. Iyalaje 115. Idi Akoko 116. Tunde 117. Idi omo 118. Iyalode 119. Idi Okuta 120. Inurin 121. Jagun Aworinde 122. Jagun Ajibade 123. Jagun Oyewo 124. Kalemori 125. Kuoye 126. Kolawolu 127. Lanseje 128. Lamulamu 129. Laawe 130. Lagbeja 131. Masao 132. Motayo 133. Mofikoya 134. Mosalo 134. Megida 135. Naana 136. Osikolaba 137. Oluawo Onisegun 138. Olorebe 139. Olukuewu 140. Oluode 141. Otinlojuoti 142. Ologa 143. Olorunbasiri 144. Olomu 145. Olobedu 146. Ojomu Awerijaye 147. Olosun 148. Olaese 149. Olola Gogoro 150. Omitokun 151. Oluawo Onifa 152. Oyo Igbajo 153. Ojomu Agbosoye 154. Oloyan 155. Ogala 156. Onijabe 157. Olabugan 158. Oyewumi 159. Oluawo Onijabe 160. Oluode Fekete 161. Oibo Taiwo 162. Olota 163. O

— Wikipedia

Arabic numerals

Arabic numerals

Arabic numerals or Hindu numerals or Hindu-Arabic numerals or Indo-Arabic numerals are the ten digits. They are descended from the Hindu-Arabic numeral system developed by Indian mathematicians, in which a sequence of digits such as "975" is read as a single number. The Indian numerals are traditionally thought to have been adopted by the Persian and Arab mathematicians in India, and passed on to the Arabs further west. This has been disputed by some, who have presented certain manuscripts as evidence that the numerals in their current form developed from Arabic letters in the western regions of the Arab World. The current form of the numerals developed in North Africa, distinct in form from the Indian and eastern Arabic numerals. It was in the North African city of Bejaia that the Italian scholar Fibonacci first encountered the numerals; his work was crucial in making them known throughout Europe. The use of Arabic numerals spread around the world through European trade, books and colonialism. Today they are the most common symbolic representation of numbers in the world. The reason the digits are more commonly known as "Arabic numerals" in Europe and the Americas is that they were introduced to Europe in the 10th century by Arabic-speakers of North Africa, who were then using the digits from Libya to Morocco. Europeans did not know about the numerals' origins in ancient India, so they named them "Arabic numerals". Arabs, on the other hand, call the system "Hindu numerals", referring to their origin in India. This is not to be confused with what the Arabs call the "Hindi numerals", namely the Eastern Arabic numerals used in the Middle East, or any of the numerals currently used in Indian languages.

— Freebase

Arabic Language

Arabic Language

Arabic is a name applied to the descendants of the Classical Arabic language of the 6th century AD. This includes both the literary language and varieties of Arabic spoken in a wide arc of territory stretching across the Middle East, North Africa, and the Horn of Africa. The literary language is called Modern Standard Arabic or Literary Arabic. It is currently the only official form of Arabic, used in most written documents as well as in formal spoken occasions, such as lectures and news broadcasts. However, this varies from one country to the other. In 1912, Moroccan Arabic was official in Morocco for some time, before Morocco joined the Arab League. Arabic languages are Central Semitic languages, most closely related to Hebrew, Aramaic, Ugaritic, and Phoenician. The standardized written Arabic is distinct from and more conservative than all of the spoken varieties, and the two exist in a state known as diglossia, used side-by-side for different societal functions. Some of the spoken varieties are mutually unintelligible, both written and orally, and the varieties as a whole constitute a sociolinguistic language. This means that on purely linguistic grounds they would likely be considered to constitute more than one language, but are commonly grouped together as a single language for political and/or ethnic reasons. If considered multiple languages, it is unclear how many languages there would be, as the spoken varieties form a dialect chain with no clear boundaries. If Arabic is considered a single language, it perhaps is spoken by as many as 422 million first language speakers, making it one of the half dozen most populous languages in the world. If considered separate languages, the most-spoken variety would most likely be Egyptian Arabic, with 54 million native speakers—still greater than any other Semitic language.

— Freebase

Levantine Arabic

Levantine Arabic

Levantine Arabic and sometimes called Eastern Arabic is a broad variety of Arabic spoken in the 100 to 200 km-wide Eastern Mediterranean coastal strip. It is considered one of the five major varieties of Arabic In the frame of the general diglossia status of the Arab world, Levantine Arabic is used for daily oral use, while most of the written and official documents and media use Modern Standard Arabic. On the basis of the criterion of mutual intelligibility, Levantine Arabic could be regarded as a self standing language, as distinct from other members of the Arabic language family such as Egyptian Arabic, Maghrebi Arabic or Peninsular Arabic, in the same way as French, Spanish and Romanian are all descended from Latin but are separate languages within the family of Romance languages.

— Freebase

Aringa people

Aringa people

Aringa is an ethnic group in the northwestern corner of Uganda, north of Lake Albert. The majority live in the rural areas of Yumbe District just south of the Sudanese border, and to a lesser extent in other areas of West Nile sub-region. They are considered the indigenous people of their lands, which was later settled by so-called "Nubians". They speak Aringa language, a Central Sudanic language. Aringa, like the neighboring Kakwa people were blamed by other groups in Uganda for doing Idi Amin's "dirty work" in the 1970s. Idi Amin was a Kakwa and his vice president Mustafa Adrisi an Aringa. After the Uganda-Tanzania War and the demise of Idi Amin's regime in 1979, Aringa were persecuted by the joint Uganda National Liberation Army and Tanzania People's Defence Force, leading them to scatter, some to Congo, some to Sudan, and the rest throughout Uganda. Until they began drifting back to their villages eight or ten years later, Aringa county was almost completely depopulated. When the Tanzanian occupying forces were replaced by UNLA during 1980, the UNLA engaged in brutal reprisals against the local civilian population, who were considered supporters of ex-Amin forces. In late 1980, guerrillas consisting of former Amin forces invaded from southern Sudan and forced some UNLA units out of the West Nile region. They included Uganda National Rescue Front, based principally among the Aringa people, and the Former Uganda National Army, based mainly among the Kakwa. This led the UNLA to engage in further reprisals, large-scale destruction of property and massacres in both Arua and Moyo, leading as many as 500,000 West Nile civilians, including Aringa, to flee to Sudan. Many remained in refugee camps in Sudan until the late 1980s when the National Resistance Army took power in Uganda. In 1987, Sudan People's Liberation Army rebels attacked and burned the camps, forcing the refugees to flee back to Uganda.

— Freebase

Arabic, Tunisian Spoken Language

Arabic, Tunisian Spoken Language

Tunisian, or Tunisian Arabic is a Maghrebi dialect of the Arabic language, spoken by some 11 million people. It is usually known by its own speakers as Derja, which means dialect, to distinguish it from Standard Arabic, or as Tunsi, which means Tunisian. It is spoken all over Tunisia, and merges, as part of a dialect continuum, into similar varieties in eastern Algeria and western Libya. Its morphology, syntax, pronunciation and vocabulary are quite different from Standard or Classical Arabic. Tunisian Arabic, like other Maghrebi dialects, has a vocabulary mostly Arabic, with significant Berber substrates, and many words and loanwords borrowed from Berber, French, Turkish, Italian and Spanish. Derja is mutually spoken and understood in the Maghreb countries, especially Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia, but hard to understand for middle eastern Arabic speakers. It continues to evolve by integrating new French or English words, notably in technical fields, or by replacing old French and Spanish ones with Standard Arabic words within some circles. In Eastern Arab countries the similar term is more commonly used for the colloquial varieties of Arabic there. Moreover, Tunisian is also closely related to Maltese, which is not considered to be a dialect of Arabic for sociolinguistic reasons.

— Freebase

Algerian Arabic

Algerian Arabic

Algerian Arabic is the variety or varieties of Arabic spoken in Algeria. In Algeria, as elsewhere, spoken Arabic differs from written Arabic; Algerian Arabic has a vocabulary mostly Arabic, with significant Berber substrates, and many new words and loanwords borrowed from French, Turkish and Spanish. Like all Arabic dialects, Algerian Arabic has dropped the case endings of the written language. It is not used in schools, television nor newspapers, which usually use Standard Arabic or French instead, but is more likely to be heard in music if not just heard in Algerian homes and on the streets. Algerian Arabic is spoken daily by the vast majority of Algerians as a vernacular language, including those for whom it is not the native tongue.

— Freebase

Arabization

Arabization

Arabization or Arabisation describes a growing cultural influence on a non-Arab area that gradually changes into one that speaks Arabic and/or incorporates Arab culture and Arab identity. It was most prominently achieved during the 7th century Arabian Muslim conquests which spread the Arabic language, culture, and—having been carried out by Arabian Muslims as opposed to Arab Christians or Arabic speaking Jews—the religion of Islam to the lands they conquered. The result: some elements of Arabian origin combined in various forms and degrees with elements taken from conquered civilizations and ultimately denominated "Arab", as opposed to "Arabian". After the rise of Islam in the Arabian Peninsula, Arab culture and language spread through trade with African states, conquest, and intermarriage of the non-Arab local population with the Arabs, in Egypt, Syria, Palestine, Iraq and the Sudan. The peninsular Arabic language became common among these areas; dialects also formed. Also, though Yemen is traditionally held to be the homeland of Arabs, most of the population did not speak Arabic prior to the spread of Islam. The influence of Arabic has also been profound in many other countries whose cultures have been influenced by Islam. Arabic was a major source of vocabulary for languages as diverse as Berber, spoken Indonesian, Tagalog, Malay, Maltese, Portuguese, Sindhi, Punjabi, Somali, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish, Urdu, as well as other languages in countries where these languages are spoken; a process that reached its high point in the 10th to the 14th centuries, the high point of Arabic culture, and although many of these words have fallen out of use since then, many remain. For example the Arabic word for book /kita:b/ is used in all the languages listed, apart from Malay and Indonesian and Portuguese and Spanish.

— Freebase

Egyptian Arabic

Egyptian Arabic

Egyptian Arabic is the language spoken by contemporary Egyptians. It is more commonly known locally as the Egyptian colloquial language or Egyptian dialect. Look below for local namings. Egyptian Arabic is a variety of the Arabic languages of the Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family. It originated in the Nile Delta in Lower Egypt around the capital Cairo. Descended from the spoken Arabic brought to Egypt during the seventh-century AD Muslim conquest, its development was influenced by the indigenous Coptic of pre-Islamic Egypt, and later by other languages such as Turkish/Ottoman Turkish, Italian, French and English. The 80 million Egyptians speak a continuum of dialects, among which Cairene is the most prominent. It is also understood across most of the Arab World due to the predominance of Egyptian media, making it the most widely spoken and one of the most widely studied varieties of Arabic. While it is essentially a spoken language, it is encountered in written form in novels, plays, poems, as well as in comics, advertising, some newspapers, and transcriptions of popular songs. In most other written media and in television news reporting, Literary Arabic is used. Literary Arabic is a standardized language based on the language of the Quran, i.e. Classical Arabic. The Egyptian vernacular is almost universally written in the Arabic alphabet for local consumption, although it is commonly transcribed into Latin letters or in the International Phonetic Alphabet in linguistics text and textbooks aimed at teaching non-native learners. Also, it is written in ASCII Latin alphabet mainly online and in SMSs.

— Freebase

Yamli

Yamli

Yamli.com is an Internet start-up focused on addressing the problems specific to the Arabic web. Yamli currently offers two main products: the smart Arabic keyboard, and Yamli Arabic Search. The smart Arabic keyboard allows users to type Arabic without an Arabic keyboard from within their web browser. This technology is based on a real-time transliteration engine which converts words typed with Latin characters to their closest Arabic equivalent. Yamli Arabic search is a search engine focused on providing more relevant search results for an Arabic query by expanding it to its most frequently used Latin representations.

— Freebase

ezzai - how to arabia

ezzai - how to arabia

The First Professional “How-To-Guide” Community For Arabia - supporting posts in Arabic and English as well. The Post and Articles are sent by Doctors, Tech, Phds, Professional, and users as well; ranging from experts posts to web and real-life related regular user who have a useful short-and-concise experience or how-to information to tell. The Post are in hundreds of categories according to our Arabic-related user experience on the web. Ezzai means literary “How To” in Egyptian ( aka arabic ) slang.

— CrunchBase

Classical Arabic

Classical Arabic

Classical Arabic, also known as Quranic Arabic, is the form of the Arabic language used in literary texts from Umayyad and Abbasid times. It is based on the Medieval dialects of Arab tribes. Modern Standard Arabic is the direct descendant used today throughout the Arab World in writing and in formal speaking, for example, prepared speeches, some radio broadcasts, and non-entertainment content. While the lexis and stylistics of Modern Standard Arabic are different from Classical Arabic, the morphology and syntax have remained basically unchanged. The vernacular dialects, however, have changed more dramatically. In the Arab world, little distinction is made between CA and MSA, and both are normally called al-fuṣḥá in Arabic, meaning 'the most eloquent'. Because the Qur'an is written in Classical Arabic, the language is considered by most Muslims to be sacred. It is mostly the language in which Muslims recite their prayers, regardless of what language they use in everyday life.

— Freebase

Egyptians

Egyptians

Egyptians are the inhabitants and citizens of Egypt sharing a common culture and a dialect of Arabic. Egyptian identity is closely tied to geography. The population of Egypt is concentrated in the lower Nile valley, the small strip of cultivable land stretching from the First Cataract to the Mediterranean and enclosed by desert both to the east and to the west. This unique geography has been the basis of the development of Egyptian society since antiquity. If regarded as a single ethnic group, the Egyptian people constitute one of the world's largest. The daily language of the Egyptians is the local variety of Arabic, known as Egyptian Arabic or Masri, Also a sizable minority of Egyptian speak Sa'idi Arabic in Upper Egypt. Egyptians are predominantly adherents of Sunni Islam with a Shia minority and a significant proportion who follow native Sufi orders. A sizable minority of Egyptians belong to the Coptic Orthodox Church, whose liturgical language, Coptic, is the last stage of the indigenous Egyptian language. ⁕Egyptians, from Greek Αἰγύπτιοι, Aiguptioi, from Αἴγυπτος, Aiguptos "Egypt". The Greek name is derived from Late Egyptian Hikuptah "Memphis", a corruption of the earlier Egyptian name Hat-ka-Ptah, meaning "home of the ka of Ptah", the name of a temple to the god Ptah at Memphis. Strabo provided a folk etymology according to which Αἴγυπτος had evolved as a compound from Aἰγαίου ὑπτίως Aegaeou huptiōs, meaning "below the Aegean". In English, the noun "Egyptians" appears in the 14th century, in Wycliff's Bible, as Egipcions.

— Freebase

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Quiz

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. harmlessly
  • B. detrimentally
  • C. noxiously
  • D. harmfully