Synonyms containing sans pareil

We've found 285 synonyms:

Sans-serif

Sans-serif

In typography, a sans-serif, sans serif, gothic, san serif or simply sans typeface is one that does not have the small projecting features called "serifs" at the end of strokes. The term comes from the French word sans, meaning "without". Sans-serif fonts tend to have less line width variation than serif fonts. In print, sans-serif fonts are used for headlines rather than for body text. The conventional wisdom holds that serifs help guide the eye along the lines in large blocks of text. Sans-serifs, however, have acquired considerable acceptance for body text in Europe. Sans-serif fonts have become the most prevalent for display of text on computer screens. This is partly because interlaced screens have shown twittering on the fine details of the horizontal serifs. Additionally, on lower-resolution digital displays, fine details like serifs may disappear or appear too large. Before the term “sans-serif” became common in English typography, a number of other terms had been used. One of these outmoded terms for sans serif was gothic, which is still used in East Asian typography and sometimes seen in font names like Century Gothic or Trade Gothic. Sans-serif fonts are sometimes, especially in older documents, used as a device for emphasis, due to their typically blacker type color.

— Freebase

Serif

Serif

In typography, a serif is a small line trailing from the edges of letters and symbols, such as when handwriting is separated into distinct units for a typewriter or typsetter. A typeface with serifs is called a serif typeface. A typeface without serifs is called sans serif or sans-serif, from the French sans, meaning “without”. Some typography sources refer to sans-serif typefaces as "Grotesque" or "Gothic", and serif typefaces as "Roman".

— Freebase

Generis

Generis

Generis is the name of a typeface designed by type designer Erik Faulhaber. Generis was first published in November 2006 by Linotype. The Generis is a type system consisting of four type families compatible both in style and metrics. It consists of 28 fonts in 6 weights. OpenType features include small caps and old style figures. To improve legibility, open letter forms include wider openings, numbers are designed with maximum individuality, lowercase “l” in Generis Sans is curved, elimination of descenders in capital letters. The Generis type families include Generis Serif, the elegant serif style with a classical essence; Generis Slab, the stable slab serif with technical characteristics; Generis Sans, the clear sans serif with an objective appearance; Generis Simple, the simplified sans serif with a contemporary nature, similar to FF Dax. The type system it is similar to the Compatil type family. The compatibility of the corresponding typefaces in the Generis type system allows document and graphic designers to create well balanced documents using the harmonizing typefaces. The fonts support ISO Adobe 2, Adobe CE, Latin Extended character sets.

— Freebase

LightSand Communications

LightSand Communications

LightSand Communications, Inc. engages in the development and delivery of SAN connectivity products that interconnect multiple SANs. Its SAN extension gateways work within the data center and over MAN/WAN networks to interconnect SANs over distance using IP, SONET/SDH, DWDM, and fiber networks. The company offers i-Series gateways that provide data movement of fiber channel, Layer 2 Ethernet, and/or FICON data over new or existing IP networks; S-series gateways that provide the means of moving data at OC-3, OC-12, and OC-48 rates; and i-1100, an intelligent FCV over routed IP gateway solution. It also provides i-8100A-SMB, a solution for small and medium businesses for interconnecting remote SANs and LAN over routed IP networks; i-8100B-SMB gateway, a solution for small and medium businesses for extending FC and Layer 2 GbE over routed IP networks; and i-8100E-SMB multi-functional interconnection gateway that offers solutions for small and medium businesses for extending FC fabrics and LAN over routed IP networks. LightSand Communications, Inc. was founded in 1999 and is based in Plano, Texas.

— CrunchBase

Sanssouci

Sanssouci

Sanssouci was the summer palace of Frederick the Great, King of Prussia, in Potsdam, near Berlin. It is often counted among the German rivals of Versailles. While Sanssouci is in the more intimate Rococo style and is far smaller than its French Baroque counterpart, it too is notable for the numerous temples and follies in the park. The palace was designed/built by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff between 1745 and 1747 to fulfill King Frederick's need for a private residence where he could relax away from the pomp and ceremony of the Berlin court. The palace's name emphasises this; it is a French phrase (sans souci), which translates as "without concerns", meaning "without worries" or "carefree", symbolising that the palace was a place for relaxation rather than a seat of power. The name in past times reflected a play on words, with the insertion of a comma visible between the words Sans and Souci, viz. Sans, Souci. Kittsteiner theorizes that this could be a philosophical play on words, meaning "without a worry/concern" or it could be some secret personal message which nobody has interpreted, left to posterity by Frederick II. Sanssouci is little more than a large, single-story villa—more like the Château de Marly than Versailles. Containing just ten principal rooms, it was built on the brow of a terraced hill at the centre of the park. The influence of King Frederick's personal taste in the design and decoration of the palace was so great that its style is characterised as "Frederician Rococo", and his feelings for the palace were so strong that he conceived it as "a place that would die with him". Because of a disagreement about the site of the palace in the park, Knobelsdorff was fired in 1746. Jan Bouman, a Dutch architect, finished the project. During the 19th century, the palace became a residence of Frederick William IV. He employed the architect Ludwig Persius to restore and enlarge the palace, while Ferdinand von Arnim was charged with improving the grounds and thus the view from the palace. The town of Potsdam, with its palaces, was a favourite place of residence for the German imperial family until the fall of the Hohenzollern dynasty in 1918. After World War II, the palace became a tourist attraction in East Germany. Following German reunification in 1990, Frederick's body was returned to the palace and buried in a new tomb overlooking the gardens he had created. Sanssouci and its extensive gardens became a World Heritage Site in 1990 under the protection of UNESCO; in 1995, the Prussian Palaces and Gardens Foundation Berlin-Brandenburg was established to care for Sanssouci and the other former imperial palaces in and around Berlin. These palaces are now visited by more than two million people a year from all over the world.

— Wikipedia

Rotis

Rotis

Rotis is a typeface developed in 1988 by Otl Aicher, a German graphic designer and typographer. In Rotis, Aicher explores an attempt at maximum legibility through a highly unified yet varied typeface family that ranges from full serif, glyphic, and sans-serif. The four basic Rotis variants are: ⁕Rotis serif — with full serifs ⁕Rotis semi-serif — with hinted serifs ⁕Rotis semi-sans — without serifs but with stroke width variation ⁕Rotis sans — without serifs and with minimal variation on stroke width

— Freebase

Palatino

Palatino

Palatino is the name of a large typeface family that began as an old style serif typeface designed by Hermann Zapf initially released in 1948 by the Linotype foundry. In 1984 Palatino was one of the typefaces originally included by Apple Computer in the Macintosh. In the early days of desktop publishing it gained great popularity until it began to be replaced by Times Roman. In 1999, Zapf revised Palatino for Linotype and Microsoft, called Palatino Linotype. The revised family incorporated extended Latin, Greek, and Cyrillic character sets. Under the collaboration of Zapf and Akira Kobayashi, the Palatino typeface family was expanded. Linotype released the Palatino nova, Palatino Sans, and Palatino Sans Informal families, expanding the Palatino typeface families to include humanist sans-serif typefaces. Palatino nova was released in 2005, while the others were released in 2006. Named after 16th century Italian master of calligraphy Giambattista Palatino, Palatino is based on the humanist fonts of the Italian Renaissance, which mirror the letters formed by a broad nib pen; this gives a calligraphic grace. But where the Renaissance faces tend to use smaller letters with longer vertical lines with lighter strokes, Palatino has larger proportions, and is considered to be a much easier to read typeface.

— Freebase

Storage area network

Storage area network

A storage area network is a dedicated network that provides access to consolidated, block level data storage. SANs are primarily used to make storage devices, such as disk arrays, tape libraries, and optical jukeboxes, accessible to servers so that the devices appear like locally attached devices to the operating system. A SAN typically has its own network of storage devices that are generally not accessible through the local area network by other devices. The cost and complexity of SANs dropped in the early 2000s to levels allowing wider adoption across both enterprise and small to medium sized business environments. A SAN does not provide file abstraction, only block-level operations. However, file systems built on top of SANs do provide file-level access, and are known as SAN filesystems or shared disk file systems.

— Freebase

Tahoma

Tahoma

Tahoma is a humanist sans-serif typeface that Matthew Carter designed for Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft first distributed it, along with Carter's Verdana, as a standard font in the initial release of Windows 95. While similar to Verdana, Tahoma has a narrower body, smaller counters, much tighter letter spacing, and a more complete Unicode character set. Carter first designed Tahoma as a bitmap font, then "carefully wrapped" TrueType outlines around those bitmaps. Carter based the bold weight on a double pixel width, rendering it closer to a heavy or black weight. In contrast with some other sans-serif typefaces, including Arial, the uppercase "I" is distinguishable from lowercase "l", which is especially important in technical publications. Since 2010, Ascender Corporation has offered italic and small caps versions of Tahoma. Tahoma is often compared with Frutiger, another humanist sans-serif typeface. In an interview by Daniel Will-Harris, Carter acknowledged that Tahoma has some similarities with his earlier Bell Centennial typeface.

— Freebase

Bayard, Chevalier de

Bayard, Chevalier de

an illustrious French knight, born in the Château Bayard, near Grenoble; covered himself with glory in the wars of Charles VIII., Louis XII., and Francis I.; his bravery and generosity commanded the admiration of his enemies, and procured for him the thrice-honourable cognomen of "The Knight sans peur et sans reproche"; one of his most brilliant feats was his defence, single-handed, of the bridge over the Garigliano, in the face of a large body of Spaniards; was mortally wounded defending a pass at Abblategrasso; fell with his face to the foe, who carried off his body, but restored it straightway afterwards for due burial by his friends (1476-1524).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Sans-culottic

Sans-culottic

pertaining to, or involving, sans-culottism; radical; revolutionary; Jacobinical

— Webster Dictionary

Sans-culottism

Sans-culottism

extreme republican principles; the principles or practice of the sans-culottes

— Webster Dictionary

Gothic

Gothic

in the USA, of a sans serif typeface using straight, even-width lines, also called grotesque

— Wiktionary

sans

sans

short for sans serif.

— Wiktionary

grotesque

grotesque

A sans serif typeface.

— Wiktionary

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