Synonyms containing sell like hot cakes

We've found 30,140 synonyms:

Hot

Hot

hot, adj. having heat: very warm: fiery: pungent: animated: ardent in temper: fervent: vehement: violent: passionate: lustful.—adj. Hot′-and-hot, of food cooked and served up at once in hot dishes.—ns. Hot′bed, a glass-covered bed heated for bringing forward plants rapidly: any place favourable to rapid growth or development, as 'a hotbed of vice,' &c.; Hot′blast, a blast of heated air blown into a furnace to raise the heat.—adjs. Hot′-blood′ed, having hot blood: high-spirited: irritable; Hot′-brained, hot-headed, rash and violent.—n. Hot′-cock′les, an old game in which a person is blindfolded, and being struck, guesses who strikes him; Hot′-flue, a drying-room.—adj. Hot′-head′ed, hot in the head: having warm passions: violent: impetuous.—n. Hot′-house, a house kept hot for the rearing of tender plants: any heated chamber or drying-room, esp. that where pottery is placed before going into the kiln: (Shak.) a brothel.—adv. Hot′ly.—adj. Hot′-mouthed, headstrong.—n. Hot′ness; Hot′-pot, a dish of chopped mutton seasoned and stewed with sliced potatoes.—v.t. Hot′press, to press paper, &c., between hot plates to produce a glossy surface.—adjs. Hot′-short, brittle when heated; Hot′-spir′ited, having a fiery spirit.—n., one pressing his steed with spurs as in hot haste: a violent, rash man.—adj. Hot′-tem′pered, having a quick temper.—ns. Hot′-trod, the hot pursuit in old Border forays; Hot′-wall, a wall enclosing passages for hot air, affording warmth to fruit-trees trained against it, when needed; Hot′-well, in a condensing engine, a reservoir for the warm water drawn off from the condenser.—Hot coppers (see Copper); Hot cross-buns (see Cross); Hot foot, with speed, fast; In hot water, in a state of trouble or anxiety; Make a place too hot to hold a person, to make it impossible for him to stay there. [A.S. hát; Ger. heiss, Sw. het.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Bakery

Bakery

A bakery is an establishment that produces and sells flour-based food baked in an oven such as bread, cakes, pastries, and pies. Some retail bakeries are also cafés, serving coffee and tea to customers who wish to consume the baked goods on the premises. Some bakery shops provide services for special occasions such as weddings, birthday parties, anniversaries, or even business events. Bakery shops can provide a wide range of cakes designs such as sheet cakes, layer cakes, tiered cakes, and wedding cakes. Other bakeries may specialize in traditional or hand made types of bread made with locally milled flour, without flour bleaching agents or flour treatment agents, baking what is sometimes referred to as artisan bread. While grocery stores and supermarkets in many countries now carry prepackaged, pre-sliced bread and cakes, or offer in store baking and basic cake decoration, some people may prefer to get their baked goods from a specialist baker's shop, either out of tradition, for the availability of a greater variety of baked goods, or from the higher quality practice of the trade of baking.

— Freebase

Jaffa Cakes

Jaffa Cakes

Jaffa Cakes are a snack introduced by McVitie and Price in 1927 and named after Jaffa oranges, and now manufactured by numerous companies including McVities, Cadbury and other biscuit manufacturers, Tesco and other supermarket chains. The most common form of Jaffa Cakes are circular, 2+¹⁄2 inches in diameter and have three layers: a sponge base, a layer of orange flavoured jelly and a coating of chocolate. Jaffa Cakes are also available as bars or in small packs, and in larger and smaller sizes. The original Jaffa Cakes come in packs of 12, 24 or 36. Jaffa Cakes are consumed primarily in the United Kingdom and Ireland. McVitie's did not trademark the name "Jaffa Cakes" and so other companies such as Tesco, Sainsbury and Aldi also make products under the name Jaffa Cakes.

— Freebase

Chiffon cake

Chiffon cake

A chiffon cake is a very light cake made with vegetable oil, eggs, sugar, flour, baking powder, and flavorings. Its distinctive feature is from the use of vegetable oil, instead of the traditional fat which is solid at room temperature, such as butter or shortening. This makes it difficult to directly beat air into the batter. As a result, chiffon cakes (as well as angel cakes and other foam cakes) achieve a fluffy texture by having egg whites beaten separately until stiff and then folded into the cake batter before baking. Its aeration properties rely on both the quality of the meringue and the chemical leaveners. A chiffon cake combines methods used with sponge cakes and conventional cakes. It includes baking powder and vegetable oil, but the eggs are separated and the whites are beaten before being folded into the batter, creating the rich flavor like an oil cake, but with a lighter texture that is more like a sponge cake. They can be baked in tube pans or layered with fillings and frostings.In the original recipe, the cake tin is not lined or greased, which enables the cake batter to stick to side of the pan, giving the cake better leverage to rise, as well as support in the cooling process when the cake is turned upside down to keep air bubbles stable.

— Wikipedia

Layer cake

Layer cake

A layer cake is a cake consisting of multiple layers, usually held together by frosting or another type of filling, such as jam or other preserves. Most cake recipes can be made into layer cakes; butter cakes and sponge cakes are common choices. Frequently, the cake is covered with icing, but sometimes, the sides are left undecorated, so that the filling and the number of layers are visible. Popular flavor combinations include the German chocolate cake, red velvet cake, Black Forest cake, and carrot cake with cream cheese icing. Many wedding cakes are decorated layer cakes. In the mid-19th century, modern cakes were first described in English. Maria Parloa's Appledore Cook Book, published in Boston in 1872, contained one of the first layer cake recipes. Another early recipe for layer cake was published in Cassell's New Universal Cookery Book, published in London in 1894.

— Freebase

Sell

Sell

sel, v.t. to deliver in exchange for something paid as equivalent: to betray for money: to impose upon, cheat.—v.i. to have commerce: to be sold, to be in demand for sale:—pa.t. and pa.p. sōld.—n. a deception.—adj. Sell′able, that can be sold.—n. Sell′er, a furnisher: a vender: a small vessel for holding salt.—Sell one's life dearly, to do great injury to the enemy before one is killed; Sell one up, to sell a debtor's goods; Sell out, to dispose entirely of: to sell one's commission. [A.S. sellan, to hand over; cf. Ice. selja, Goth. saljan.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cakery

Cakery

A cakery or cake shop is a retail business specializing in producing and/or selling cakes; they may also sell cupcakes, muffins, sponges, as well as other baked goods that fall under the title of a cake. Cake shops may also sell equipment and supplies for home cake baking, especially for cake decorating, but not all do this. Another common but not universal sideline is special orders such as wedding cakes and elaborate birthday cakes. Products are baked on site in the same manner to that of a bakery but does not make or sell other associated items. The term "cakery" may sometimes be used to get around the fact that "bakery" or "bakeries" have been taken as a name for many long established businesses and new entrants want to stand out.

— Wikipedia

Coffee cake

Coffee cake

Coffee cake is a common cake or sweetbread available in many countries. The term "coffee cake" can refer to any of the following: ⁕A class of cakes intended to be eaten alongside coffee or that may be eaten during a "coffee break" or offered to guests as a gesture of hospitality on or around a coffee table. Under this definition, a coffee cake does not necessarily contain coffee. They are typically single layer cakes that may be square or rectangular like a Stollen or loaf-shaped rectangular cakes, or they may be ring shaped. Coffee cakes may be flavored with cinnamon or other spices, seeds, nuts and fruits. These cakes sometimes have a crumbly or crumb topping called streusel and/or a light glaze drizzle. Some similarity to teacakes may be found, though teacakes can be individually sized baked items served with tea. ⁕A cake, often sponge cake, which is made with coffee or has a coffee flavor.

— Freebase

Cakes and Ale

Cakes and Ale

Cakes and Ale: or, the Skeleton in the Cupboard is a novel by British author William Somerset Maugham. Maugham exposes the misguided social snobbery leveled at the character Rosie Driffield, whose frankness, honesty and sexual freedom make her a target of conservative propriety. Her character is treated favourably by the book's narrator, Ashenden, who understands her sexual energy to be a muse to the many artists who surround her. Maugham drew his title from the remark of Sir Toby Belch to Malvolio in William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night: "Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?" Cakes and ale are the emblems of the good life in the tagline to the fable attributed to Aesop, "The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse": "Better beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear". It is one of two books to take the same quote for a title, the other being by Edward Spencer Mott. In 1958 Maugham stated in a CBC interview that Cakes and Ale was his favourite of all his novels.

— Freebase

Royal icing

Royal icing

Royal icing is a hard white icing, made from softly beaten egg whites, icing sugar, and sometimes lemon or lime juice. It is used on Christmas cakes, wedding cakes, gingerbread houses and many other cakes and biscuits, either as a smooth covering, or in sharp peaks. Glycerine is often added to prevent the icing from setting too hard. When placing icing on cakes, Marzipan is usually used under the royal icing in order to prevent discoloration of the icing. Usual proportions are 2 egg whites to 1 teaspoon of lemon juice, 1 teaspoon of glycerine, and 1 pound of sugar. The amount of sugar however must be altered to get the right consistency for application. As well as coating cakes and biscuits, royal icing is used to make decorations such as flowers and figures for putting on the cake. The Royal Icing is piped into shapes which are allowed to harden on a non-stick surface. These can then be arranged to create edible decorative effects on a variety of sweet foods. The Glycerine must be omitted for this purpose. Royal Icing is often used to create snow scenes but is also used as an edible adhesive - particularly for ginger bread houses.

— Freebase

Crab cake

Crab cake

A crab cake is a variety of fishcake that is popular in the United States. It is composed of crab meat and various other ingredients, such as bread crumbs, mayonnaise, mustard (typically prepared mustard, but sometimes mustard powder), eggs, and seasonings, particularly the cake is then sautéed, baked, grilled, deep fried, or broiled, and then served. Crab cakes are traditionally associated with the area surrounding the Chesapeake Bay, in particular the states of Maryland and Virginia.Crab cakes are particularly popular along the coast of the Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic states, where the crabbing industry thrives. They can also be commonly found in New England, the Gulf Coast, the Pacific Northwest, and the Northern California coast. While meat from any species of crab may be used, the blue crab, whose native habitat includes the Chesapeake Bay, is the traditional choice and generally considered to be the best tasting. In the Pacific Northwest and Northern California, the endemic Dungeness Crab is a popular ingredient for crab cakes, and the cakes are prepared at many well-established restaurants throughout the region.

— Wikipedia

Scald

Scald

skawld, v.t. to burn with hot liquid: to cook slightly, as fruit, in hot water or steam: to cleanse thoroughly by rinsing with very hot water.—n. a burn caused by hot liquid.—ns. Scald′er, one who scalds vessels: a pot for scalding; Scald′-fish, a marine flat fish; Scald′ing, things scalded; Scald′-rag, a nickname for a dyer.—Scalding hot, so hot as to scald. [O. Fr. escalder (Fr. échauder)—Low L. excaldāre, to bathe in warm water—ex, from, calidus, warm, hot.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tansy cakes

Tansy cakes

Tansy was a traditional Easter food in medieval English cuisine. Its name came from the Tanacetum vulgare plant. The simplest version of the recipe was made by baking a batter flavored with green tansy juice. Later recipes, like the one from the 16th-century Good Housewife's Handbook added more ingredients like parsley, feverfew and violets to an egg batter that was fried like pancakes, though with a slightly green coloring from the addition of tansy and other herbs. Baked tansy could also be given a green color by adding spinach juice. An 18th-century recipe from The Compleat Housewife added sack to the batter and sweetened the fried tansies with gooseberries and a topping of crushed sugar. Cakes and wine were a common feature of Easter traditions. Some 19th-century authors believed that the tradition of eating tansy cakes, which had a sweet and bitter flavor, was connected to Jewish traditions of eating cakes made with bitter herbs. Sometimes the tansy was closer to a pudding than a pancake, like Hannah Glasse's 18th-century recipe in the Art of Cookery, an elaborate dish with Naples biscuits, butter, cream, blanched almonds, eggs, grated bread, rose water, orange blossom water and other spices and sweeteners.

— Wikipedia

hot shot

hot shot

Shot made red-hot for the purpose of setting fire to buildings, shipping, etc. The charges for hot shot are from one-fourth to one-sixth the weight of the shot. With small velocities, the shot splits and splinters the wood, so as to render it favorable for burning. With great velocity the ball sinks into the wood, is deprived of air by the closing of the hole, and chars instead of burning the surrounding wood. It should not penetrate deeper than 10 or 12 inches. Red-hot balls do not set fire to the wood until some time after their penetration. They retain sufficient heat to ignite wood after having made several ricochets upon water. The wads for hot shot should be made of clay or hay, the latter to be well soaked in water, and before being used, the water pressed out of it. With proper precautions in loading, the ball may be permitted to cool in the gun without igniting the charge. The piece, however, should be fired with as little delay as possible, as the vapor would diminish the strength of the powder. They are heated by means of furnaces erected for the purpose, which hold sixty or more shot. The shot being placed, and the furnace cold, it requires one hour and fifteen minutes to heat them to a red heat; but after the furnace is once heated, a 24-pounder shot is brought to a red heat in twenty-five minutes. Red-hot shot is not in general use.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

Hot and cold cognition

Hot and cold cognition

Hot cognition is a hypothesis on motivated reasoning in which a person's thinking is influenced by their emotional state. Put simply, hot cognition is cognition coloured by emotion. Hot cognition contrasts with cold cognition, which implies cognitive processing of information that is independent of emotional involvement. Hot cognition is proposed to be associated with cognitive and physiological arousal, in which a person is more responsive to environmental factors. As it is automatic, rapid and led by emotion, hot cognition may consequently cause biased and low-quality decision making. Hot cognition may arise, with varying degrees of strength, in politics, religion, and other sociopolitical contexts because of moral issues, which are inevitably tied to emotion. Hot cognition was initially proposed in 1963 by Robert P. Abelson. This idea became popular in the 1960s and the 1970s. An example of a biased decision caused by hot cognition would be a juror disregarding evidence because of an attraction to the defendant.Decision making with cold cognition is more likely to involve logic and critical analysis. Therefore, when an individual engages in a task when displaying cold cognition, the stimuli is likely to be emotionally neutral and the "outcome of the test is not motivationally relevant" to the individual. An example of a critical decision using cold cognition would be concentrating on the evidence before drawing a conclusion. Hot and cold cognition form a dichotomy within executive functioning. Executive functioning has long been considered as a domain general cognitive function, but there has been support for separation into "hot" affective aspects and "cold" cognitive aspects. It is recognized that executive functioning spans across a number of cognitive tasks including working memory, cognitive flexibility and reasoning in active goal pursuit. The distinction between hot and cool cognition implies that executive function may operate differently in different contexts. The distinction has been applied to research in cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, clinical psychology, social psychology, neuropsychology, and other areas of study in psychology.

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. pernicious
  • B. deathly
  • C. lethal
  • D. deific