Synonyms containing send word to

We've found 16,327 synonyms:

Word

Word

wurd, n. an oral or written sign expressing an idea or notion: talk, discourse: signal or sign: message: promise: declaration: a pass-word, a watch-word, a war-cry: the Holy Scripture, or a part of it: (pl.) verbal contention.—v.t. to express in words: (Shak.) to flatter.—v.i. to speak, talk.—ns. Word′-blind′ness, loss of ability to read; Word′-book, a book with a collection of words: a vocabulary.—adj. Word′-bound, unable to find expression in words.—n. Word′-build′ing, the formation or composition of words.—adj. Wor′ded, expressed in words.—adv. Wor′dily.—ns. Wor′diness; Wor′ding, act, manner, or style of expressing in words.—adj. Wor′dish (obs.), verbose.—n. Wor′dishness.—adj. Word′less (Shak.), without words, silent.—ns. Word′-mem′ory, the power of recalling words to the mind; Word′-paint′er, one who describes vividly; Word′-paint′ing, the act of describing anything clearly and fully by words only; Word′-pic′ture, a description in words which presents an object to the mind as if in a picture.—adj. Wor′dy, full of words: using or containing many words.—Word for word, literally, verbatim.—Break one's word, to fail to fulfil a promise; By word of mouth, orally; Good word, favourable mention, praise; Hard words, angry, hot words; Have a word with, to have some conversation with; Have words with, to quarrel, dispute with; In a word, In one word, in short, to sum up; In word, in speech only, in profession only; Pass one's word, to make a promise; The Word, the Scripture: (theol.) the second person in the Trinity, the Logos. [A.S. word; Goth. waurd, Ice. orth, Ger. wort; also conn. with L. verbum, a word, Gr. eirein, to speak.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Word recognition

Word recognition

Word recognition, according to Literacy Information and Communication System (LINCS) is "the ability of a reader to recognize written words correctly and virtually effortlessly". It is sometimes referred to as "isolated word recognition" because it involves a reader's ability to recognize words individually from a list without needing similar words for contextual help. LINCS continues to say that "rapid and effortless word recognition is the main component of fluent reading" and explains that these skills can be improved by "practic[ing] with flashcards, lists, and word grids". In her 1990 review of the science of learning to read, psychologist Marilyn Jager Adams wrote that "the single immutable and nonoptional fact about skilful reading is that it involves relatively complete processing of the individual letters of print." The article "The Science of Word Recognition" says that "evidence from the last 20 years of work in cognitive psychology indicates that we use the letters within a word to recognize a word". Over time, other theories have been put forth proposing the mechanisms by which words are recognized in isolation, yet with both speed and accuracy. These theories focus more on the significance of individual letters and letter-shape recognition (ex. serial letter recognition and parallel letter recognition). Other factors such as saccadic eye movements and the linear relationship between letters also affect the way we recognize words.An article in ScienceDaily suggests that "early word recognition is key to lifelong reading skills". There are different ways to develop these skills. For example, creating flash cards for words that appear at a high frequency is considered a tool for overcoming dyslexia. It has been argued that prosody, the patterns of rhythm and sound used in poetry, can improve word recognition.Word recognition is a manner of reading based upon the immediate perception of what word a familiar grouping of letters represents. This process exists in opposition to phonetics and word analysis, as a different method of recognizing and verbalizing visual language (i.e. reading). Word recognition functions primarily on automaticity. On the other hand, phonetics and word analysis rely on the basis of cognitively applying learned grammatical rules for the blending of letters, sounds, graphemes, and morphemes. Word recognition is measured as a matter of speed, such that a word with a high level of recognition is read faster than a novel one. This manner of testing suggests that comprehension of the meaning of the words being read is not required, but rather the ability to recognize them in a way that allows proper pronunciation. Therefore, context is unimportant, and word recognition is often assessed with words presented in isolation in formats such as flash cards Nevertheless, ease in word recognition, as in fluency, enables proficiency that fosters comprehension of the text being read.The intrinsic value of word recognition may be obvious due to the prevalence of literacy in modern society. However, its role may be less conspicuous in the areas of literacy learning, second-language learning, and developmental delays in reading. As word recognition is better understood, more reliable and efficient forms of teaching may be discovered for both children and adult learners of first-language literacy. Such information may also benefit second-language learners with acquisition of novel words and letter characters. Furthermore, a better understanding of the processes involved in word recognition may enable more specific treatments for individuals with reading disabilities.

— Wikipedia

Cockney rhyming slang

Cockney rhyming slang

A cant used by Cockneys in which a word or phrase is replaced by a rhyming word or phrase, this word or phrase then often being abbreviated to its first syllable or syllables, or its first word. The word chosen as the rhyme often shares attributes of the word that it replaces.

— Wiktionary

onsend

onsend

To send; send on; send out; forward; transmit.

— Wiktionary

Send

Send

send, v.t. to cause to go: to cause to be conveyed: to despatch: to forward: to compel: to throw: to hurl: to authorise: to grant: to drive: to dismiss: to commission: to diffuse: to bestow.—v.i. to despatch a message or messenger: (naut.) to pitch into the trough of the sea:—pa.t. and pa.p. sent.—n. (Scot.) a messenger, esp. one sent for the bride: a present: the impulse of a wave on a ship.—ns. Sen′der, one who sends: (teleg.) the instrument by which a message is transmitted; Sen′ding, despatching: pitching bodily into the trough of the sea; Send′-off, a start as on a journey.—Send for, to require by message to come or be brought; Send forth, or out, to give, put, or bring forth; Send to Coventry, to cut: to exclude from society. [A.S. sendan; Ice. senda, Goth. sandjan, Ger. senden.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Yumber

Yumber

Imagine navigating the Internet the way you talk. Instead of long difficult to share URLs, what if you could navigate the web by simply inputting a word or phrase without the for https, .coms, or /’s. What if you could verbally share URLs & more?Yumber is empowering people to create their own VRLs (verbal resource locators) which serve as simple verbal pathways to information that is difficult to remember and share. Instead of having to share difficult information through email, social media, or print, with this new technology you can share complex information verbally with ease. These VRLs, or as they are called, Yumbers, allow you to share hard to remember information such as physical addresses, phone numbers, URLs, etc. by simply attaching the target ( to a word or phrase which can easily be spoken and remembered by someone else. Whether you are trying to share your new address with a long lost friend you met at the market, or a funny YouTube video with an audience of thousands, you can do so simply and verbally by telling them the Yumber. So what is a Yumber? A Yumber is a word or phrase that redirects the user to a specific target. A target can be a URL, phone number, physical address, email address, file, collection of files, photos, etc. virtually anything you want to share can be tied to a Yumber and then shared verbally face to face, over the radio, on the tv, or from a stage to thousands of people. Try it yourself, goto Yumber.com and enter the Yumber: One man band You will find yourself watching a YouTube video located at a complicated YouTube URL without requiring you to speak the computer language necessary to read that lengthy YouTube address: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uXMuWi0dUBc So what is a Yumber? It is natural, it is the marriage of word of mouth and technology, it is the way you learned to speak from birth, which technology, until now, has attempted to train out of you. With Yumber.com you can share anything with anyone anywhere using a simple word or phrase that you created for that purpose. Why tell someone I will email you the link later, Or I will email you the file later, when you can simply tell them the associated Yumber to the target now and allow them to look it up at their convenience? The Internet was created by techies for techies. However, even these techies realized the need to evolve the Internet when the number of sites grew to the point at which it become difficult to remember all of the IP addresses of the new sites. In its infancy the Internet was navigates by using IP addresses such as 192.168.0.1. To simplify navigation the a second layer was created, which is the domain name based system we still use today. This domain name system, complete with https, .coms, and /’s alike, is still on the level with the old and unintuitive MS DOS command prompt. Just as Apple evolved the computer with its intuitive and human friendly operating system, Yumber is seeking to evolve the sharing of technology by adding another layer of simplicity that is more intuitive than the last. Instead of humans having to conform with the confines of computer language as defined by technology, Yumber adds a layer of humanity to technology allowing people to share themselves and their interests verbally in face to face settings. Whether one on one, or while presenting to large audiences, Yumber helps you to put the power back in word of mouth communication.

— CrunchBase

Nervous system

Nervous system

The nervous system is the part of an animal that coordinates its actions by transmitting signals to and from different parts of its body. The nervous system detects environmental changes that impact the body, then works in tandem with the endocrine system to respond to such events. Nervous tissue first arose in wormlike organisms about 550 to 600 million years ago. In vertebrates it consists of two main parts, the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The CNS consists of the brain and spinal cord. The PNS consists mainly of nerves, which are enclosed bundles of the long fibers or axons, that connect the CNS to every other part of the body. Nerves that transmit signals from the brain are called motor or efferent nerves, while those nerves that transmit information from the body to the CNS are called sensory or afferent. Spinal nerves serve both functions and are called mixed nerves. The PNS is divided into three separate subsystems, the somatic, autonomic, and enteric nervous systems. Somatic nerves mediate voluntary movement. The autonomic nervous system is further subdivided into the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous systems. The sympathetic nervous system is activated in cases of emergencies to mobilize energy, while the parasympathetic nervous system is activated when organisms are in a relaxed state. The enteric nervous system functions to control the gastrointestinal system. Both autonomic and enteric nervous systems function involuntarily. Nerves that exit from the cranium are called cranial nerves while those exiting from the spinal cord are called spinal nerves. At the cellular level, the nervous system is defined by the presence of a special type of cell, called the neuron, also known as a "nerve cell". Neurons have special structures that allow them to send signals rapidly and precisely to other cells. They send these signals in the form of electrochemical waves traveling along thin fibers called axons, which cause chemicals called neurotransmitters to be released at junctions called synapses. A cell that receives a synaptic signal from a neuron may be excited, inhibited, or otherwise modulated. The connections between neurons can form neural pathways, neural circuits, and larger networks that generate an organism's perception of the world and determine its behavior. Along with neurons, the nervous system contains other specialized cells called glial cells (or simply glia), which provide structural and metabolic support. Nervous systems are found in most multicellular animals, but vary greatly in complexity. The only multicellular animals that have no nervous system at all are sponges, placozoans, and mesozoans, which have very simple body plans. The nervous systems of the radially symmetric organisms ctenophores (comb jellies) and cnidarians (which include anemones, hydras, corals and jellyfish) consist of a diffuse nerve net. All other animal species, with the exception of a few types of worm, have a nervous system containing a brain, a central cord (or two cords running in parallel), and nerves radiating from the brain and central cord. The size of the nervous system ranges from a few hundred cells in the simplest worms, to around 300 billion cells in African elephants.The central nervous system functions to send signals from one cell to others, or from one part of the body to others and to receive feedback. Malfunction of the nervous system can occur as a result of genetic defects, physical damage due to trauma or toxicity, infection or simply of ageing. The medical specialty of neurology studies disorders of the nervous system and looks for interventions that can prevent or treat them. In the peripheral nervous system, the most common problem is the failure of nerve conduction, which can be due to different causes including diabetic neuropathy and demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Neuroscience is the field of science that focuses on the study of the nervous system.

— Wikipedia

Relay network

Relay network

A relay network is a broad class of network topology commonly used in wireless networks, where the source and destination are interconnected by means of some nodes. In such a network the source and destination cannot communicate to each other directly because the distance between the source and destination is greater than the transmission range of both of them, hence the need for intermediate node(s) to relay. A relay network is a type of network used to send information between two devices, for e.g. server and computer, that are too far away to send the information to each other directly. Thus the network must send or "relay" the information to different devices, referred to as nodes, that pass on the information to its destination. A well-known example of a relay network is the Internet. A user can view a web page from a server halfway around the world by sending and receiving the information through a series of connected nodes. In many ways, a relay network resembles a chain of people standing together. One person has a note he needs to pass to the girl at the end of the line. He is the sender, she is the recipient, and the people in between them are the messengers, or the nodes. He passes the message to the first node, or person, who passes it to the second and so on until it reaches the girl and she reads it. The people might stand in a circle, however, instead of a line. Each person is close enough to reach the person on either side of him and across from him. Together the people represent a network and several messages can now pass around or through the network in different directions at once, as opposed to the straight line that could only run messages in a specific direction. This concept, the way a network is laid out and how it shares data, is known as network topology. Relay networks can use many different topologies, from a line to a ring to a tree shape, to pass along information in the fastest and most efficient way possible. Often the relay network is complex and branches off in multiple directions to connect many servers and computers. Where two lines from two different computers or servers meet forms the nodes of the relay network. Two computer lines might run into the same router, for example, making this the node. Wireless networks also take advantage of the relay network system. A laptop, for example, might connect to a wireless network which sends and receives information through another network and another until it reaches its destination. Even though not all parts of the network have physical wires, they still connect to other devices that function as the nodes. This type of network holds several advantages. Information can travel long distances, even if the sender and receiver are far apart. It also speeds up data transmission by choosing the best path to travel between nodes to the receiver's computer. If one node is too busy, the information is simply routed to a different one. Without relay networks, sending an email from one computer to another would require the two computers be hooked directly together before it could work.

— Wikipedia

Sooligan

Sooligan

Bringing offline conversations about campus life and the city online. Digital platform for word-of-mouth. Background Students have hundreds of thoughts throughout the day. Many of these mind ramblings deal directly with something local and in-the-moment, such as the lack of open parking spots near the South entrance of campus, or the short wait time at Starbucks on the corner. These seemingly insignificant, but frequent, raves & rants are brief so people usually keep them to ourselves. However, each of these thoughts can be extremely valuable local insight to another student in the city if only they were shared in the moment. For example: before driving to a restaurant, you could benefit from knowing that the place is packed right now, and they just ran out of your favorite shrimp tacos 2 minutes ago. Or that the main library on campus is completely packed right now. These types of useful local knowledge tend to come from friends as ‘word-of-mouth.' But you probably don't have friends everywhere you go, which means you don't have access to word-of-mouth everywhere either. Until now. Sooligan provides real-time local information by capturing the raves, rants, and thoughts of locals in every city, essentially being a platform for digital ‘word-of-mouth.' We make it easy and fun to access ‘word-of-mouth' in any city, about anything.

— CrunchBase

calque

calque

A word or phrase in a language formed by word-for-word or morpheme-by-morpheme translation of a word in another language.

— Wiktionary

cognate

cognate

A word either descended from the same base word of the same ancestor language as the given word, or strongly believed to be a regular reflex of the same reconstructed root of proto-language as the given word.

— Wiktionary

semordnilap

semordnilap

A word, phrase, or sentence that has the property of forming another word, phrase, or sentence when its letters are reversed. A semordnilap differs from a palindrome in that the word or phrase resulting from the reversal is different from the original word or phrase.

— Wiktionary

Australian rhyming slang

Australian rhyming slang

The set of slang expressions used by Australians in which a word or phrase is replaced by a rhyming word or phrase, this word or phrase then often being abbreviated to its first syllable or syllables, or its first word. Examples include bag of fruit, joe blake and Noah's ark. Much Australian rhyming slang overlaps with the rhyming slang of the UK, the US and NZ.

— Wiktionary

combining form

combining form

A form of a word used for combining with other words or other combining forms to make new words. A combining form may conjoin with an independent word (e.g., mini- + skirt), another combining form (e.g., photo- + -graphy) or an affix (e.g., cephal + -ic); it is thus distinguished from an affix, which can be added to either a free word or a combining form but not solely to another affix (e.g., Iceland + -ic but not pro- + -ic). It can also be distinguished historically from an affix when it is borrowed from another language in which it is descriptively a word (e.g., the French mal gave the English mal- in malodorous) or a combining form (e.g., the Greek kako-, a combining form of kakos, gave the English caco- in cacography).

— Wiktionary

mirliton

mirliton

A buzzword created to refer to and advertise a new women's bonnet style (AKA "coiffure de gaze" as seen in the early 19th century French painting Portrait De Jeune Femme (En Coiffure De Gaze) by Henri Pierre-Louis Grevedon see here) of 1723 involving a gauzy cloth or net for which the word was invented. Within months, comedies of the time created songs and verses using the new word to make light of political and social leaders. The word gained the meaning sense as a catch-all phrase such that it might refer to any silly trifle or thing of little value or merit as in the English word folderol. From there, it acquired more serious, specific usages.

— Wiktionary

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