Synonyms containing send-up

We've found 1,212 synonyms:

onsend

onsend

To send; send on; send out; forward; transmit.

— Wiktionary

Send

Send

send, v.t. to cause to go: to cause to be conveyed: to despatch: to forward: to compel: to throw: to hurl: to authorise: to grant: to drive: to dismiss: to commission: to diffuse: to bestow.—v.i. to despatch a message or messenger: (naut.) to pitch into the trough of the sea:—pa.t. and pa.p. sent.—n. (Scot.) a messenger, esp. one sent for the bride: a present: the impulse of a wave on a ship.—ns. Sen′der, one who sends: (teleg.) the instrument by which a message is transmitted; Sen′ding, despatching: pitching bodily into the trough of the sea; Send′-off, a start as on a journey.—Send for, to require by message to come or be brought; Send forth, or out, to give, put, or bring forth; Send to Coventry, to cut: to exclude from society. [A.S. sendan; Ice. senda, Goth. sandjan, Ger. senden.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Nervous system

Nervous system

The nervous system is the part of an animal that coordinates its actions by transmitting signals to and from different parts of its body. The nervous system detects environmental changes that impact the body, then works in tandem with the endocrine system to respond to such events. Nervous tissue first arose in wormlike organisms about 550 to 600 million years ago. In vertebrates it consists of two main parts, the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The CNS consists of the brain and spinal cord. The PNS consists mainly of nerves, which are enclosed bundles of the long fibers or axons, that connect the CNS to every other part of the body. Nerves that transmit signals from the brain are called motor or efferent nerves, while those nerves that transmit information from the body to the CNS are called sensory or afferent. Spinal nerves serve both functions and are called mixed nerves. The PNS is divided into three separate subsystems, the somatic, autonomic, and enteric nervous systems. Somatic nerves mediate voluntary movement. The autonomic nervous system is further subdivided into the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous systems. The sympathetic nervous system is activated in cases of emergencies to mobilize energy, while the parasympathetic nervous system is activated when organisms are in a relaxed state. The enteric nervous system functions to control the gastrointestinal system. Both autonomic and enteric nervous systems function involuntarily. Nerves that exit from the cranium are called cranial nerves while those exiting from the spinal cord are called spinal nerves. At the cellular level, the nervous system is defined by the presence of a special type of cell, called the neuron, also known as a "nerve cell". Neurons have special structures that allow them to send signals rapidly and precisely to other cells. They send these signals in the form of electrochemical waves traveling along thin fibers called axons, which cause chemicals called neurotransmitters to be released at junctions called synapses. A cell that receives a synaptic signal from a neuron may be excited, inhibited, or otherwise modulated. The connections between neurons can form neural pathways, neural circuits, and larger networks that generate an organism's perception of the world and determine its behavior. Along with neurons, the nervous system contains other specialized cells called glial cells (or simply glia), which provide structural and metabolic support. Nervous systems are found in most multicellular animals, but vary greatly in complexity. The only multicellular animals that have no nervous system at all are sponges, placozoans, and mesozoans, which have very simple body plans. The nervous systems of the radially symmetric organisms ctenophores (comb jellies) and cnidarians (which include anemones, hydras, corals and jellyfish) consist of a diffuse nerve net. All other animal species, with the exception of a few types of worm, have a nervous system containing a brain, a central cord (or two cords running in parallel), and nerves radiating from the brain and central cord. The size of the nervous system ranges from a few hundred cells in the simplest worms, to around 300 billion cells in African elephants.The central nervous system functions to send signals from one cell to others, or from one part of the body to others and to receive feedback. Malfunction of the nervous system can occur as a result of genetic defects, physical damage due to trauma or toxicity, infection or simply of ageing. The medical specialty of neurology studies disorders of the nervous system and looks for interventions that can prevent or treat them. In the peripheral nervous system, the most common problem is the failure of nerve conduction, which can be due to different causes including diabetic neuropathy and demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Neuroscience is the field of science that focuses on the study of the nervous system.

— Wikipedia

Relay network

Relay network

A relay network is a broad class of network topology commonly used in wireless networks, where the source and destination are interconnected by means of some nodes. In such a network the source and destination cannot communicate to each other directly because the distance between the source and destination is greater than the transmission range of both of them, hence the need for intermediate node(s) to relay. A relay network is a type of network used to send information between two devices, for e.g. server and computer, that are too far away to send the information to each other directly. Thus the network must send or "relay" the information to different devices, referred to as nodes, that pass on the information to its destination. A well-known example of a relay network is the Internet. A user can view a web page from a server halfway around the world by sending and receiving the information through a series of connected nodes. In many ways, a relay network resembles a chain of people standing together. One person has a note he needs to pass to the girl at the end of the line. He is the sender, she is the recipient, and the people in between them are the messengers, or the nodes. He passes the message to the first node, or person, who passes it to the second and so on until it reaches the girl and she reads it. The people might stand in a circle, however, instead of a line. Each person is close enough to reach the person on either side of him and across from him. Together the people represent a network and several messages can now pass around or through the network in different directions at once, as opposed to the straight line that could only run messages in a specific direction. This concept, the way a network is laid out and how it shares data, is known as network topology. Relay networks can use many different topologies, from a line to a ring to a tree shape, to pass along information in the fastest and most efficient way possible. Often the relay network is complex and branches off in multiple directions to connect many servers and computers. Where two lines from two different computers or servers meet forms the nodes of the relay network. Two computer lines might run into the same router, for example, making this the node. Wireless networks also take advantage of the relay network system. A laptop, for example, might connect to a wireless network which sends and receives information through another network and another until it reaches its destination. Even though not all parts of the network have physical wires, they still connect to other devices that function as the nodes. This type of network holds several advantages. Information can travel long distances, even if the sender and receiver are far apart. It also speeds up data transmission by choosing the best path to travel between nodes to the receiver's computer. If one node is too busy, the information is simply routed to a different one. Without relay networks, sending an email from one computer to another would require the two computers be hooked directly together before it could work.

— Wikipedia

pack

pack

To cause to go; to send away with baggage or belongings; especially, to send away peremptorily or suddenly; – sometimes with off. See pack off

— Wiktionary

e-mail

e-mail

To send, or compose and send, an e-mail or e-mails.

— Wiktionary

Sensory neuron

Sensory neuron

Sensory neurons are neurons responsible for converting various external stimuli that come from the environment into corresponding internal stimuli. They are activated by sensory input, and send projections to other elements of nervous system, ultimately conveying sensory information to the brain or spinal cord. Unlike neurons of the central nervous system, whose inputs come from other neurons, sensory neurons are activated by physical modalities such as light, sound, and temperature. In complex organisms, the central nervous system is the destination to which sensory neurons transmit their data; in the case of less complex organisms, such as the hydra, sensory neurons send their data to motor neurons and sensory neurons can also send data via electrical impulses to the brain. At the molecular level, sensory receptors located on the cell membrane of sensory neurons are responsible for the conversion of stimuli into electrical impulses. The type of receptor employed by a given sensory neuron determines the type of stimulus it will be sensitive to. For example, neurons containing mechanoreceptors are sensitive to tactile stimuli, while olfactory receptors make a cell sensitive to odors.

— Freebase

Data link

Data link

In telecommunication a data link is the means of connecting one location to another for the purpose of transmitting and receiving digital information. It can also refer to a set of electronics assemblies, consisting of a transmitter and a receiver and the interconnecting data telecommunication circuit. These are governed by a link protocol enabling digital data to be transferred from a data source to a data sink. There are at least three types of basic data-link configurations that can be conceived of and used: ⁕Simplex communications, most commonly meaning all communications in one direction only. ⁕Half-duplex communications, meaning communications in both directions, but not both ways simultaneously. ⁕Duplex communications, communications in both directions simultaneously. In civil aviation, a data-link system is used to send information between aircraft and air traffic controllers when an aircraft is too far from the ATC to make voice radio communication and radar observations possible. Such systems are used for aircraft crossing the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. One such system, used by NavCanada and NATS over the North Atlantic, uses a five-digit data link sequence number confirmed between air traffic control and the pilots of the aircraft before the aircraft proceeds to cross the ocean. This system uses the aircraft's flight management computer to send location, speed and altitude information about the aircraft to the ATC. ATC can then send messages to the aircraft regarding any necessary change of course.

— Freebase

Delegate

Delegate

to send as one's representative; to empower as an ambassador; to send with power to transact business; to commission; to depute; to authorize

— Webster Dictionary

Forward

Forward

to send forward; to send toward the place of destination; to transmit; as, to forward a letter

— Webster Dictionary

Pack

Pack

to cause to go; to send away with baggage or belongings; esp., to send away peremptorily or suddenly; -- sometimes with off; as, to pack a boy off to school

— Webster Dictionary

Refer

Refer

hence: To send or direct away; to send or direct elsewhere, as for treatment, aid, information, decision, etc.; to make over, or pass over, to another; as, to refer a student to an author; to refer a beggar to an officer; to refer a bill to a committee; a court refers a matter of fact to a commissioner for investigation, or refers a question of law to a superior tribunal

— Webster Dictionary

sceithman

sceithman

An old statute term signifying pirate. 'SCENDING [from ascend]. The contrary motion to pitching. (See SEND.)

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

Demise

Demise

dē-mīz′, n. a transferring: death, esp. of a sovereign or a distinguished person: a transfer of the crown or of an estate to a successor.—v.t. to send down to a successor: to bequeath by will.—adj. Demī′sable. [O. Fr. demise, pa.p. of desmettre, to lay down—L. dimittĕre, to send away—L. dis, aside, and mittĕre, missum, to send.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

official courtesies

official courtesies

The interchange of official compliments and visits between foreign military or naval officers and the authorities of a military post are international in character. In all cases it is the duty of the commandant of a military post, without regard to his rank, to send a suitable officer to offer civilities and assistance to a vessel of war (foreign or otherwise) recently arrived. After such offer it is the duty of the commanding officer of the vessel to send a suitable officer to acknowledge such civilities, and request that a time be specified for his reception by the commanding officer of the post. The commanding officer of the post, after the usual offer of civilities, is always to receive the first visit without regard to rank. The return visit by the commanding officer of the military post is made the following day, or as soon thereafter as practicable.

— Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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A synonym of "dry"
  • A. steamy
  • B. sodden
  • C. drippy
  • D. juiceless