Synonyms containing sheen-net

We've found 1,684 synonyms:

Net

Net

net, n. an open fabric of twine, &c., knotted into meshes for catching birds, fishes, &c.: anything like a net for keeping out insects, &c.: a meshed bag for holding a woman's hair: machine-made lace of various kinds: a snare: a difficulty.—adj. made of netting or resembling it, reticulate: caught in a net.—v.t. to form into network: to take with a net: to protect with a net, to veil.—v.i. to form network:—pr.p. net′ting; pa.t. and pa.p. net′ted.ns. Net′-fish, any fish, like the herring, caught in nets—opp. to Trawl-fish and Line-fish; Net′-fish′ery, a place for net-fishing, the business of such fishing; Net′-fish′ing, the method or the industry of fishing with nets.—p.adj. Net′ted, made into a net, reticulated: caught in a net.—ns. Net′ting, act or process of forming network: a piece of network: any network of ropes or wire, esp. for use on shipboard; Net′ting-need′le, a kind of shuttle used in netting.—adjs. Net′ty, like a net; Net′-veined, in entomology, having a great number of veins or nervures like a network on the surface, as in the wings of many Orthoptera; Net′-winged, having net-veined wings.—n. Net′work, any work showing cross lines or open spaces like the meshes of a net. [A.S. net, nett; Dut. net, Ger. netz.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Net settlement

Net settlement

A net settlement is a payment system used for inter-bank transactions. It is the process by which banks calculate the collective total of all transactions up until designated times within each day.In an inter-bank payment system using net settlement, debits and credits are recorded and only the difference between the debits and the credits (the net position) is actually paid between the parties. In most payment systems this netting will take place on the clearing house books between the designated settlement times with final settlement of the net positions occurring occurs when funds are debited or credited on its reserve account at a central bank, in the US at a Federal Reserve Bank. For example, if two parties (A and B) are exchanging transactions bilaterally in a net settlement scheme, and A pays B ¤200 and B pays A ¤150, the net obligation to be settled is ¤50 from A to B. The rest is effectively 'canceled out'.Multilateral net settlement occurs when there are three or more parties involved. In this example, A pays B ¤200, B pays C ¤150, and C pays A ¤175. The net obligations in the multilateral model are for A and C to each pay ¤25 into the settlement 'pot', and for B to receive ¤50.Net settlement is used because it reduces the amount of money that has to be held in the settlement medium compared to gross settlement, which requires immediate payment of each individual transaction. It also reduces inter-bank risks. Net settlement is a multilateral transaction, usually with the central bank for the currency being used. All transactions included in a multilateral net settlement cycle are settled in one movement of funds representing the overall net position. Examples of net settlement systems are CHIPS in the US, CHAPS in the UK, and BOJ-NET (until 2000) in Japan.Net settlement can introduce its own particular risks. If the application of transactions to the netting is not legally binding, in the event of the insolvency of a participant, the other participants may end up legally owing their gross obligations to the failed participant, and not be due any settlement from the failed participant in return. Furthermore, if one of the participants in a net settlement system is unable to settle its obligations at the end of the settlement cycle, it prevents the settlement from completing for all parties: this may require unwinding all the transactions that have been placed into that settlement cycle.A special form of net settlement is used in the settlement of securities obligations, known as delivery versus payment.

— Wikipedia

Charlie Sheen

Charlie Sheen

Carlos Irwin Estévez (born September 3, 1965), known professionally as Charlie Sheen, is an American actor. Sheen has appeared in films including Platoon (1986), Wall Street (1987), Young Guns (1988), Eight Men Out (1988), Major League (1989), Hot Shots! (1991), and The Three Musketeers (1993). In the 2000s, Sheen replaced Michael J. Fox in Spin City, his performance earning him a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Television Series Musical or Comedy. He then starred in Two and a Half Men which earned him several Golden Globe and Emmy Award nominations. He most recently starred in the FX comedy series Anger Management, which concluded its 100-episode run in 2014. In 2010, Sheen was the highest paid actor on television and earned US$1.8 million per episode of Two and a Half Men.Sheen's personal life has made headlines, including reports of alcohol and drug abuse and marital problems, as well as allegations of domestic violence. In March 2011, his contract for Two and a Half Men was terminated by CBS and Warner Bros following his derogatory comments about the series' creator, Chuck Lorre. On November 17, 2015, Sheen publicly revealed that he is HIV positive, having been diagnosed about four years earlier.

— Wikipedia

Net profit

Net profit

Net profit, also referred to as the bottom line, net income, or net earnings is a measure of the profitability of a venture after accounting for all costs. In a survey of nearly 200 senior marketing managers, 91 percent responded that they found the "net profit" metric very useful. In accounting, net profit is equal to the gross profit minus overheads minus interest payable for a given time period. A common synonym for "net profit" when discussing financial statements is the bottom line. This term results from the traditional appearance of an income statement which shows all allocated revenues and expenses over a specified time period with the resulting summation on the bottom line of the report. In simplistic terms, net profit is the money left over after paying all the expenses of an endeavor. In practice this can get very complex in large organizations or endeavors. The bookkeeper or accountant must itemise and allocate revenues and expenses properly to the specific working scope and context in which the term is applied. Definitions of the term can, however, vary between the UK and US. In the US, net profit is often associated with net income or profit after tax.

— Freebase

Free cash flow

Free cash flow

In corporate finance, free cash flow is cash flow available for distribution among all the securities holders of a corporate entity. They include equity holders, debt holders, preferred stock holders, convertible security holders, and so on. Note that the first three lines above are calculated for you on the standard Statement of Cash Flows. When Net profit and Tax rate applicable are given, you can also calculate it by taking: where, ⁕Net Capital Expenditure = Capex - Depreciation & Amortization ⁕Tax Shield = Net Interest Expense X Effective Tax Rate When PAT and Debit/Equity ratio is available: where d - is the debt/equity ratio. e.g.: For a 3:4 mix it will be 3/7. Therefore, There are two differences between Net Income and Free Cash Flow: The first is the accounting for the consumption of capital goods. The Net Income measure uses depreciation, while the Free Cash Flow measure uses last period's net capital purchases. The second difference is that the Free Cash Flow measurement deducts increases in net working capital, where the net income approach does not. Typically, in a growing company with a 30 day collection period for receivables, a 30 day payment period for purchases, and a weekly payroll, it will require more and more working capital to finance the labor and profit components embedded in the growing receivables balance. The net income measure essentially says, "You can take that cash home" because you would still have the same productive capacity as you started with. The Free Cash Flow measurement however would say, "You can't take that home" because you would cramp the enterprise from operating itself forward from there.

— Freebase

Drift netting

Drift netting

Drift netting is a fishing technique where nets, called drift nets, are allowed to float freely at the surface of a sea or lake. Usually a drift net is a gill net with floats attached to a rope along the top of the net, and weights attached to another rope along the foot of the net to keep it vertical in the water. Drift nets are placed by ships and are left free-floating until retrieved. These nets usually target schools of pelagic fish. Drift nets are a type of gill net because of the tendency for the fishes' gills to get caught in the net. Traditionally drift nets were made of organic materials, such as hemp, which were biodegradable. Prior to 1950, nets tended to have a larger mesh size. The larger mesh only caught the larger fish, allowing the smaller, younger ones to slip through. When drift net fishing grew in scale during the 1950s, the industry changed to synthetic materials with smaller mesh size. Synthetic nets last longer, are odorless and nearly invisible in the water, and do not biodegrade. Drift net fishing became a commercial fishing practice because it is cost effective. Nets can be placed by low-powered vessels making it fuel efficient. Drift nets are also effective at bringing in large amounts of fish in one catch.

— Freebase

Net worth

Net worth

In business, net worth is the total assets minus total outside liabilities of an individual or a company. For a company, this is called shareholders' preference and may be referred to as book value. Net worth is stated as at a particular year in time. In the case of an individual, the term estate is used in relation to deceased individuals in probate. For businesses, the term is used in the context of fraudulent law and on the dissolution of the company. In personal finance, net worth refers to an individual's net economic position; similarly, it uses the value of all assets minus the value of all liabilities. Net worth in business is generally based on the value of all assets and liabilities at the carrying value which is the value as expressed on the financial statements. To the extent items on the balance sheet do not express their true value, the net worth will also be inaccurate. Net worth in this formulation is not an expression of the market value of the firm: the firm may be worth more if sold as a going concern. On reading the balance sheet, if the accumulated losses exceed the shareholder's equity, it is a negative value for net worth.

— Freebase

Hand net

Hand net

A hand net, also called a scoop net, is a net or mesh basket held open by a hoop. It may or may not be on the end of a handle. Hand nets have been used since antiquity and can be used for scooping fish near the surface of the water, such as muskellunge or northern pike. A hand net with a long handle is often called a dip net. There are popular contemporary dip net Sockeye Salmon fisheries in Chitina, Kenai River,and Kasilof River Alaska, typically lasting two to three weeks, and is regarded as a subsistence fishery for Alaska residents only. Dip nets can also be used to scoop crabs in shallow water. The basket is made of wire or nylon mesh, rather than cloth mesh, since crabs fight, bite, twist and turn when they are caught. When a hand net is used by an angler to help land a fish it is called a landing net. Because hand netting is not destructive to fish, hand nets are often used for tag and release, or to capture aquarium fish.

— Freebase

Cast net

Cast net

A cast net, also called a throw net, is a net used for fishing. It is a circular net with small weights distributed around its edge. The net is cast or thrown by hand in such a manner that it spreads out on the water and sinks. This technique is called net casting or net throwing. Fish are caught as the net is hauled back in. This simple device is particularly effective for catching small bait or forage fish, and has been in use, with various modifications, for thousands of years. On the US Gulf Coast, it is used especially to catch mullet, which will not bite a baited hook.

— Freebase

Net gain

Net gain

In telecommunications, net gain is the overall gain of a transmission circuit. Net gain is measured by applying a test signal at an appropriate power level at the input port of a circuit and measuring the power delivered at the output port. The net gain in dB is calculated by taking 10 times the common logarithm of the ratio of the output power to the input power. The net gain expressed in dB may be positive or negative. If the net gain expressed in dB is negative, it is also called the "net loss". If the net gain is expressed as a ratio, and the ratio is less than unity, a net loss is indicated. The test signal must be chosen so that its power level is within the usual operating range of the circuit being tested.

— Freebase

Net tonnage

Net tonnage

Net tonnage is a dimensionless index calculated from the total moulded volume of the ship's cargo spaces by using a mathematical formula. Defined in The International Convention on Tonnage Measurement of Ships that was adopted by the International Maritime Organization in 1969, the net tonnage replaced the earlier net register tonnage which denoted the volume of the ship's revenue-earning spaces in "register tons", units of volume equal to 100 cubic feet. Net tonnage is used to calculate the port duties and should not be taken as less than 30 per cent of the ship's gross tonnage. Net tonnage is not a measure of the weight of the ship or its cargo, and should not be confused with terms such as deadweight tonnage or displacement. Also, unlike the net register tonnage, the net tonnage is unitless and thus can not be defined as "tons" or "net tons".

— Freebase

Net income

Net income

In business, net income - also referred to as the bottom line, net profit, or net earnings - is an entity's income minus expenses for an accounting period. It is computed as the residual of all revenues and gains over all expenses and losses for the period, and has also been defined as the net increase in stockholder's equity that results from a company's operations. In the context of the presentation of financial statements, the IFRS Foundation defines net income as synonymous with profit and loss. Net income is a distinct accounting concept from profit. Profit is a term that "means different things to different people", and different line items in a financial statement may carry the term "profit", such as gross profit and profit before tax. In contrast, net income is a precisely defined term in accounting.

— Freebase

Apocalypse Now

Apocalypse Now

Apocalypse Now is a 1979 American epic war film directed, produced and co-written by Francis Ford Coppola. It stars Marlon Brando, Robert Duvall, Martin Sheen, Frederic Forrest, Albert Hall, Sam Bottoms, Laurence Fishburne and Dennis Hopper. The screenplay, co-written by Coppola and John Milius (who received an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay) and narration written by Michael Herr, is a loose adaptation of the novella Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad. The setting was changed from late 19th-century Congo to the Vietnam War 1969–70, the years in which Green Beret Colonel Robert Rheault, commander of the 5th Special Forces Group, was indicted for murder and President Richard Nixon authorized the secret Cambodian Campaign. Coppola said that Rheault was an inspiration for the character of Colonel Kurtz. The voice-over narration of Willard was written by war correspondent Herr, whose 1977 Vietnam memoir Dispatches brought him to the attention of Coppola. A major influence on the film was Werner Herzog's Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972), which also features a river journey and an insane soldier. The film is about a river journey from South Vietnam into Cambodia undertaken by Captain Benjamin L. Willard (a character based on Conrad's Marlow and played by Sheen), who is on a secret mission to assassinate Colonel Kurtz, a renegade Army officer accused of murder and who is presumed insane. The film has been noted for the problems encountered while making it, chronicled in the documentary Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse (1991). These problems included Brando arriving on the set overweight and completely unprepared, expensive sets being destroyed by severe weather and Sheen having a breakdown and suffering a near-fatal heart attack while on location. Problems continued after production as the release was postponed several times while Coppola edited thousands of feet of film. Apocalypse Now was honored with the Palme d'Or at Cannes Film Festival, nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture and the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Drama. Initial reviews were mixed; while Vittorio Storaro's cinematography was widely acclaimed, several critics found Coppola's handling of the story's major themes to be anticlimactic and intellectually disappointing. Apocalypse Now is today considered to be one of the greatest films ever made. It ranked No. 14 in Sight & Sound's greatest films poll in 2012. In 2000, the film was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant".

— Wikipedia

Two and a Half Men

Two and a Half Men

Two and a Half Men is an American television sitcom that originally aired on CBS for twelve seasons from September 22, 2003, to February 19, 2015. Originally starring Charlie Sheen, Jon Cryer, and Angus T. Jones, the series was about a hedonistic jingle writer, Charlie Harper, his uptight brother, Alan, and Alan's troublesome son, Jake. After Alan divorces, he and Jake move into Charlie's beachfront Malibu house and complicate Charlie's freewheeling life. In 2010, CBS and Warner Bros. Television reached a multiyear broadcasting agreement for the series, renewing it through at least the 2011–12 season. In February 2011, however, CBS and Warner Bros. decided to end production for the rest of the eighth season after Sheen entered drug rehabilitation and made "disparaging comments" about the series' creator and executive producer Chuck Lorre. Sheen's contract was terminated the following month and he was confirmed not to be returning to the series. Ashton Kutcher was hired to replace him the following season as Walden Schmidt, a billionaire who buys Charlie's house after his death. In April 2013, CBS renewed the series for an eleventh season after closing one-year deals with Kutcher and Cryer. Jones, who was attending college, was relegated to recurring status for season 11 but did not make an appearance until the series finale. He was replaced by Jenny (Amber Tamblyn), Charlie's previously unknown daughter. In March 2014, CBS renewed the series for a twelfth season, which was later announced to be the series' last. The season began airing in October 2014 and concluded in February 2015 with the 40-minute series finale "Of Course He's Dead". The success of the series led to it being the fourth-highest revenue-generating program for 2012, earning $3.24 million an episode.

— Wikipedia

Josiah Bartlet

Josiah Bartlet

Josiah Edward "Jed" Bartlet is a fictional character from the American television serial drama The West Wing, portrayed by Martin Sheen. The role earned Sheen a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Television Series Drama in 2001, as well as two SAG Awards. Bartlet's tenure as a Democratic President of the United States is a preeminent aspect of the series. His origin as a recurring character evolved due to Sheen's acting finesse; creator Aaron Sorkin and fellow West Wing writers shaped Bartlet's role within the show accordingly. The first season depicts part of his first and second years in office and subsequent seasons flesh out the details of his administration, including friction between his policies and those of the Republican-dominated Congress, his tribulations with multiple sclerosis, his reelection, and the campaign of his successor. Characterized by manifest integrity, quick witticisms, a fierce intellect, and compassionate stoicism, Bartlet is widely acclaimed by critics and political commentators alike as the "most popular Democratic president in recent memory".

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. combine
  • B. merge
  • C. aggregate
  • D. defuse