Synonyms containing shift finish time

We've found 26,492 synonyms:

Time

Time

tīm, n. a point at which, or period during which, things happen: a season or proper time: an opportunity: absolute duration: an interval: past time: the duration of one's life: allotted period: repetition of anything or mention with reference to repetition: musical measure, or rate of movement: a measured interval in verse: (gram.) the relation of a verb with regard to tense: the umpire's call in prize-fights, &c.: hour of travail: the state of things at any period, usually in pl.: the history of the world, as opposed to eternity: addition of a thing to itself.—v.t. to do at the proper season: to regulate as to time: (mus.) to measure.—v.i. to keep or beat time.—ns. Time′-ball, a ball arranged to drop from the summit of a pole at a particular time; Time′-bargain, a contract to buy or sell merchandise or stock at a certain time in the future.—adjs. Time′-beguil′ing, making the time pass quickly; Time′-bett′ering, improving the state of things as time goes on; Time′-bewast′ed (Shak.), wasted or worn by time.—ns. Time′-bill, a time-table; Time′-book, a book for keeping an account of the time men have worked; Time′-card, a card bearing a time-table: a card with blank spaces for workmen's hours, &c., being filled in; Time′-fuse, a fuse calculated to burn a definite length of time; Time′-gun, a gun which is fired by means of a mechanical contrivance and a current of electricity at a particular time.—adj. Time′-hon′oured, honoured for a long time: venerable on account of antiquity.—ns. Time′ist, Tim′ist, a musical performer in relation to his sense for time; Time′-keep′er, a clock, watch, or other instrument for keeping or marking time: one who keeps the time of workmen.—adj. Time′less, done at an improper time, unseasonable: (Shak.) done before the proper time.—adv. Time′lessly, before the proper time: unseasonably.—n. Time′liness.—adj. Time′ly, in good time: sufficiently early: (obs.) keeping time.—adv. early, soon.—adjs. Time′ly-part′ed (Shak.), having died in time—i.e. at a natural time; Time′ous, in Scot. legal phraseology, in good time: seasonable.—adv. Time′ously, in good time.—ns. Time′piece, a piece of machinery for keeping time, esp. a clock for a mantel-piece; Time′-pleas′er (Shak.), one who complies with prevailing opinions, whatever they be; Time′-serv′er, one who serves or meanly suits his opinions to the times.—adj. Time′-serving, complying with the spirit of the times or with present power.—n. mean compliance with the spirit of the times or with present power.—ns. Time′-tā′ble, a table or list showing the times of certain things, as trains, steamers, &c.; Time′-thrust<

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Shift

Shift

shift, v.t. to change in form or character: to put out of the way: to dress in fresh clothes.—v.i. to change about: to remove: to change one's clothes: to resort to expedients for some purpose: in violin-playing, to move the left hand from its original position next to the nut.—n. a change: in violin-playing, any position of the left hand except that nearest the nut: a squad or relay of men: a contrivance: an artifice: last resource: a chemise or woman's undermost garment (orig. signifying a change of body-linen).—adj. Shift′able, capable of being shifted.—ns. Shift′er, one who shifts: a trickster; Shift′iness, the character of being shifty.—adj. Shift′ing, unstable: shifty.—adv. Shift′ingly.—adj. Shift′less, destitute of shifts or expedients: unsuccessful, for want of proper means.—adv. Shift′lessly.—n. Shift′lessness.—adj. Shift′y, full of, or ready with, shifts, contrivances, or expedients.—Shift about, to vacillate: to turn quite round to the opposite point; Shift for one's self, to provide for one's self; Shift of crops, rotation of crops; Shift off, to defer: to put away.—Make shift, to find ways and means of doing something, contrive. [A.S. sciftan, to divide, Ice. skipta.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Logical shift

Logical shift

In computer science, a logical shift is a bitwise operation that shifts all the bits of its operand. The two base variants are the logical left shift and the logical right shift. This is further modulated by the number of bit positions a given value shall be shifted, like "shift left by 1" or a "shift right by n". Unlike an arithmetic shift, a logical shift does not preserve a number's sign bit or distinguish a number's exponent from its mantissa; every bit in the operand is simply moved a given number of bit positions, and the vacant bit-positions are filled in, usually with zeros. A logical shift is often used when its operand is being treated as a sequence of bits rather than as a number. Logical shifts can be useful as efficient ways of performing multiplication or division of unsigned integers by powers of two. Shifting left by n bits on a signed or unsigned binary number has the effect of multiplying it by 2. Shifting right by n bits on an unsigned binary number has the effect of dividing it by 2. Because arithmetic right shift differs from logical right shift, many languages have different operators for them. For example, in Java and JavaScript, the arithmetic right shift operator is >>; whereas the logical right shift operator is >>>.

— Freebase

Midline shift

Midline shift

Midline shift is a shift of the brain past its center line. The sign may be evident on neuroimaging such as CT scanning. The sign is considered ominous because it is commonly associated with a distortion of the brain stem that can cause serious dysfunction evidenced by abnormal posturing and failure of the pupils to constrict in response to light. Midline shift is often associated with high intracranial pressure, which can be deadly. In fact, midline shift is a measure of ICP; presence of the former is an indication of the latter. Presence of midline shift is an indication for neurosurgeons to take measures to monitor and control ICP. Immediate surgery may be indicated when there is a midline shift of over 5 mm. The sign can be caused by conditions including traumatic brain injury,stroke, hematoma, or birth deformity that leads to a raise intracranial pressure. Methods of Detection Doctors detect midline shift using a variety of methods. The most prominent measurement is done by a computed tomography scan and the CT Gold Standard is the standardized operating procedure for detecting MLS. Since the midline shift is often easily visible with a CT scan, the high precision of Magnetic Resonance Imaging is not necessary, but can be used with equally adequate results. Newer methods such as bedside sonography can be used with neurocritical patients who cannot undergo some scans due to their dependence on ventilators or other care apparatuses. Sonography has proven satisfactory in the measurement of MLS, but is not expected to replace CT or MRI. Automated measurement algorithms are used for exact recognition and precision in measurements from an initial CT scan. A major benefit to using the automated recognition tools includes being able to measure even the most deformed brains because the method doesn’t depend on normal brain symmetry. Also, it lessens the chance of human error by detecting MLS from an entire image set compared to selecting the single most important slice, which allows the computer to do the work that was once manually done.

— Freebase

Dependency

Dependency

In a project network, a dependency is a link amongst a project's terminal elements. There are four kinds of dependencies with respect to ordering terminal elements: ⁕Finish to start ⁕A FS B = B can't start before A is finished ⁕ ⁕ FS ⁕Finish to finish ⁕A FF B = B can't finish before A is finished ⁕ ⁕ FF ⁕Start to start. ⁕A SS B = B can't start before A starts ⁕ ⁕ SS ⁕Start to finish ⁕A SF B = B can't finish before A starts ⁕ ⁕ SF Finish-to-start is considered a "natural dependency" whereas all the others are constraints imposed by the scheduler to reflect resource constraints or preferential dependencies. SF is rarely used, and should generally be avoided. There are three kinds of dependencies with respect to the reason for the existence of dependency: ⁕Causal ⁕It is impossible to edit a text before it is written ⁕It is illogical to pour concrete before you dig the foundations of a building ⁕Resource constraints ⁕It is logically possible to paint four walls in a room simultaneously but there is only one painter

— Freebase

swing shift

swing shift

A work shift between a day shift and a night shift, such as from 4PM to midnight, and the group of workers scheduled to work such a shift at a facility.

— Wiktionary

Shift key

Shift key

The shift key is a modifier key on a keyboard, used to type capital letters and other alternate "upper" characters. There are typically two shift keys, on the left and right sides of the row below the home row. The shift key's name originated from the typewriter, where one had to press and hold the button to shift up the case stamp to change to capital letters; the shift key was first used in the Remington No. 2 Type-Writer of 1878; the No. 1 model was capital-only. On the US layout and similar keyboard layouts, characters that typically require the use of the shift key include the parentheses, the question mark, the exclamation point, and the colon. When the caps lock key is engaged, the shift key can be used to type lowercase letters on many operating systems, but not Mac OS X.

— Freebase

Shift register

Shift register

In digital circuits, a shift register is a cascade of flip flops, sharing the same clock, in which the output of each flip-flop is connected to the "data" input of the next flip-flop in the chain, resulting in a circuit that shifts by one position the "bit array" stored in it, shifting in the data present at its input and shifting out the last bit in the array, at each transition of the clock input. More generally, a shift register may be multidimensional, such that its "data in" and stage outputs are themselves bit arrays: this is implemented simply by running several shift registers of the same bit-length in parallel. Shift registers can have both parallel and serial inputs and outputs. These are often configured as serial-in, parallel-out or as parallel-in, serial-out. There are also types that have both serial and parallel input and types with serial and parallel output. There are also bi-directional shift registers which allow shifting in both directions: L→R or R→L. The serial input and last output of a shift register can also be connected to create a circular shift register.

— Freebase

Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay

Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay

An electrophoretic mobility shift assay or mobility shift electrophoresis, also referred as a gel shift assay, gel mobility shift assay, band shift assay, or gel retardation assay, is a common affinity electrophoresis technique used to study protein–DNA or protein–RNA interactions. This procedure can determine if a protein or mixture of proteins is capable of binding to a given DNA or RNA sequence, and can sometimes indicate if more than one protein molecule is involved in the binding complex. Gel shift assays are often performed in vitro concurrently with DNase footprinting, primer extension, and promoter-probe experiments when studying transcription initiation, DNA replication, DNA repair or RNA processing and maturation. Although precursors can be found in earlier literature, most current assays are based on methods described by Garner and Revzin and Fried and Crothers.

— Freebase

Universal Time

Universal Time

A measure of time that conforms, within a close approximation, to the mean diurnal rotation of the Earth and serves as the basis of civil timekeeping. Universal Time (UT1) is determined from observations of the stars, radio sources, and also from ranging observations of the moon and artificial Earth satellites. The scale determined directly from such observations is designated Universal Time Observed (UTO); it is slightly dependent on the place of observation. When UTO is corrected for the shift in longitude of the observing station caused by polar motion, the time scale UT1 is obtained. When an accuracy better than one second is not required, Universal Time can be used to mean Coordinated Universal Time.

— Wiktionary

General classification

General classification

The general classification in bicycle racing is the category that tracks overall times for bicycle riders in multi-stage bicycle races. Each stage will have a stage winner, but the overall winner in the GC is the rider who has the fastest time when all the stage results are added together. Riders who finish in the same group are awarded the same time, with possible subtractions due to time bonuses. Two riders are said to have finished in the same group if the gap between them is less than one bike-length. A crash in the final three kilometers of a normal stage means that all riders in the same group entering the final kilometer are given the same time. A restriction on this rule occurs during stages that finish in a mountain climb. Riders involved in a crash during the last three kilometers of these races must still finish the stage and are awarded the time received when crossing the finish line. Note that it is possible to win the GC without winning even one stage of a multi-stage race. It is even possible to win the GC of the race without being the GC leader on any stage before the last stage of the race. In many bicycle races, the current leader of the GC gets a special jersey awarded. In the Tour de France, the leader wears a yellow jersey, in the Giro d'Italia a pink jersey, and in the Vuelta a España the leader's jersey is red. It is considered an honor to wear the special jersey.

— Freebase

Shift work

Shift work

Shift work is an employment practice designed to make use of, or provide service across, all 24 hours of the clock each day of the week. The practice typically sees the day divided into "shifts", set periods of time during which different groups of workers take up their posts. The term "shift work" includes both long-term night shifts and work schedules in which employees change or rotate shifts. Shift work is considered a risk factor for many health problems. It has many negative cognitive effects. In addition, rotating night shift work disrupts our circadian clocks which is associated with a higher probability of developing obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Shift work can also contribute to strain of marital, family, and personal relationships.

— Freebase

Antigenic shift

Antigenic shift

Antigenic shift is the process by which two or more different strains of a virus, or strains of two or more different viruses, combine to form a new subtype having a mixture of the surface antigens of the two or more original strains. The term is often applied specifically to influenza, as that is the best-known example, but the process is also known to occur with other viruses, such as visna virus in sheep. Antigenic shift is a specific case of reassortment or viral shift that confers a phenotypic change. Antigenic shift is contrasted with antigenic drift, which is the natural mutation over time of known strains of influenza which may lead to a loss of immunity, or in vaccine mismatch. Antigenic drift occurs in all types of influenza including influenzavirus A, influenza B and influenza C. Antigenic shift, however, occurs only in influenzavirus A because it infects more than just humans. Affected species include other mammals and birds, giving influenza A the opportunity for a major reorganization of surface antigens. Influenza B and C principally infect humans, minimizing the chance that a reassortment will change its phenotype drastically.

— Freebase

swing shift

swing shift

A type of shift time within a shift pattern for an employee that starts work at a specific time in the morning or afternoon and continues until a time in the evening to support both an employee who is working an open shift and an employee who is working a close shift.

— Editors Contribution

Ring counter

Ring counter

A ring counter is a type of counter composed of a type circular shift register. The output of the last shift register is fed to the input of the first register. The hamming distance of a Johnson counter is 1, the hamming distance of an Overbeck counter is 2. There are two types of ring counters: A straight ring counter or Overbeck counter connects the output of the last shift register to the first shift register input and circulates a single one bit around the ring. For example, in a 4-register one-hot counter, with initial register values of 1000, the repeating pattern is: 1000, 0100, 0010, 0001, 1000... . Note that one of the registers must be pre-loaded with a 1 in order to operate properly. A twisted ring counter, also called Johnson counter or Möbius counter, connects the complement of the output of the last shift register to the input of the first register and circulates a stream of ones followed by zeros around the ring. For example, in a 4-register counter, with initial register values of 0000, the repeating pattern is: 0000, 1000, 1100, 1110, 1111, 0111, 0011, 0001, 0000... .

— Freebase

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