Synonyms containing six articles

We've found 6,978 synonyms:

Six

Six

siks, adj. and n. five and one: a figure denoting six units (6, or vi.): a playing-card with six spots, the face of a die bearing six spots, or that die itself: beer sold at six shillings a barrel, small beer: (pl.) in hymnology, a quatrain in trochaic measure, the lines of three feet or six syllables.—adj. Six′fold, folded or multiplied six times.—ns. Six′footer, a person six feet high; Six′pence, a silver coin=six pence.—adj. Six′penny, worth sixpence: cheap, worthless.—ns. Six′-shoot′er, a six-chambered revolver; Sixte, a parry in which the hand is on guard opposite the right breast, the point of the sword raised and moved a little to the right.—adjs. and ns. Six′teen, six and ten; Six′teenth, the sixth after the tenth.—adj. Sixth, the last of six: the ordinal of six.—n. the sixth part: (mus.) an interval of four tones and a semitone, or six intervals.—adv. Sixth′ly, in the sixth place.—Sixth hour, noon-tide.—Be at sixes and sevens, to be in disorder; Long sixes, candles weighing six to the pound, about 8 inches long; Short sixes, candles weighing six to the pound, about 4 inches long. [A.S. siex; Ger. sechs, Gael. se; also L. sex, Gr. hex, Sans. shash.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Nupedia

Nupedia

Nupedia was an English-language web-based encyclopedia whose articles were written by volunteer contributors with appropriate subject matter expertise, reviewed by expert editors before publication, and licensed as free content. It was founded by Jimmy Wales and underwritten by Bomis, with Larry Sanger as editor-in-chief. Nupedia lasted from October 1999 until September 2003. It is mostly known now as the predecessor of Wikipedia, but Nupedia had a seven-step approval process to control content of articles before being posted, rather than live wiki-based updating. Nupedia was designed by committee, with experts to predefine the rules, and it approved only 21 articles in its first year, compared to Wikipedia posting 200 articles in the first month, and 18,000 in the first year. Unlike Wikipedia, Nupedia was not a wiki; it was instead characterized by an extensive peer-review process, designed to make its articles of a quality comparable to that of professional encyclopedias. Nupedia wanted scholars (ideally with PhDs) to volunteer content. Before it ceased operating, Nupedia produced 25 approved articles that had completed its review process (three articles also existed in two versions of different lengths), and 150 more articles were in progress. Jimmy Wales preferred Wikipedia's easier posting of articles, while Larry Sanger preferred the peer-reviewed approach used by Nupedia and later founded Citizendium in 2006 as an expert reviewed alternative to Wikipedia.In June 2008, CNET UK listed Nupedia as one of the greatest defunct Web sites in the still young history of the Internet, noting how the strict control had limited the posting of articles.

— Wikipedia

Article

Article

ärt′i-kl, n. a separate element, member, or part of anything: a particular substance: a single clause or term: a distinct point in an agreement, or an agreement looked at as complete, as in 'articles of apprenticeship,' &c.: rules or conditions generally: a section of any document: a literary composition in a journal, newspaper, encyclopædia, &c., treating of a subject distinctly and independently: (gram.) the name given to the adjectives the (definite article) and a or an (indefinite article).—v.t. to draw up or bind by articles: to indict, charge with specific accusations: bind by articles of apprenticeship.—adj. Artic′ular, belonging to the joints.—Articles of association, regulations for the business of a joint-stock company registered under the Companies Acts; Articles of faith, binding statement of points held by a particular Church; Articles of war, code of regulations for the government and discipline of the army and navy.—In the article of death (L. in articulo mortis), at the point of death.—Lords of the Articles, a standing committee of the Scottish parliament who drafted the measures to be submitted.—The Thirty-nine Articles, the articles of religious belief finally agreed upon by the entire bishops and clergy of the Church of England in 1562. [L. articulus, a little joint—artus, a joint.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Article

Article

An article is a word that is used with a noun to indicate the type of reference being made by the noun. Articles specify the grammatical definiteness of the noun, in some languages extending to volume or numerical scope. The articles in the English language are the and a/an, and some. 'An' and 'a' are modern forms of the Old English 'an', which in Anglian dialects was the number 'one' and survived into Modern Scots as the number 'ane'. Both 'on' and 'an' survived into Modern English, with 'one' used as the number and 'an' as an indefinite article. Traditionally in English, an article is usually considered to be a type of adjective. In some languages, articles are a special part of speech, which cannot easily be combined with other parts of speech. It is also possible for articles to be part of another part of speech category such as a determiner, an English part of speech category that combines articles and demonstratives. In languages that employ articles, every common noun, with some exceptions, is expressed with a certain definiteness, just as many languages express every noun with a certain grammatical number. Every noun must be accompanied by the article, if any, corresponding to its definiteness, and the lack of an article itself specifies a certain definiteness. This is in contrast to other adjectives and determiners, which are typically optional. This obligatory nature of articles makes them among the most common words in many languages—in English, for example, the most frequent word is the.

— Freebase

Gold Stripping Bat

Gold Stripping Bat

A bath for removing gold from plated articles without dissolving the base in order to save the precious metal. A bath of 10 parts of potassium cyanide and 100 parts of water may be used, the articles to be stripped being immersed therein as the anode of an active circuit. If the gilding is on a silver or copper basis, or on an alloy of these metals the same solution attacks the base and dissolves it, which is objectionable. For silver articles it is enough to heat to cherry red and throw into dilute sulphuric acid. The gold scales off in metallic spangles. For copper articles, a mixture of 10 volumes concentrated sulphuric acid, 1 volume nitric acid, and 2 volumes hydrochloric acid may be used by immersion only, or with a battery. The sulphuric acid in such large excess is supposed to protect the copper. For copper articles concentrated sulphuric acid alone with the battery may be used. This does not sensibly attack the copper if it is not allowed to become diluted. Even the dampness of the air may act to dilute it.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

Senary

Senary

sen′ar-i, adj. containing six: of or belonging to six.—n. Senā′rius, in Latin prosody, a verse of six feet. [L. senariusseni, six each—sex, six.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation

The Articles of Confederation, formally the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, was an agreement among the 13 founding states that established the United States of America as a confederation of sovereign states and served as its first constitution. Its drafting by the Continental Congress began in mid-1776, and an approved version was sent to the states for ratification in late 1777. The formal ratification by all 13 states was completed in early 1781. Even when not yet ratified, the Articles provided domestic and international legitimacy for the Continental Congress to direct the American Revolutionary War, conduct diplomacy with Europe and deal with territorial issues and Indian relations. Nevertheless, the government created by the Articles became a matter of concern for key nationalists. On March 4, 1789, the Articles were replaced with the U.S. Constitution. The new Constitution provided for a much stronger national government with a chief executive, courts, and taxing powers.

— Freebase

Knol

Knol

Knol was a Google project that aimed to include user-written articles on a range of topics. The project was led by Udi Manber of Google, announced December 13, 2007, and was opened in beta to the public on July 23, 2008 with a few hundred articles mostly in the health and medical field. Some Knol pages were opinion papers of one or more authors, and others described products for sale. Some articles were how-to articles or explained product use. Other people could post comments below an article, such as to refute opinions or reject product claims. Lower-case, the term knol, which Google defined as a "unit of knowledge", referred to an article in the project. Several experts saw Knol as Google's attempt to compete with Wikipedia, while others pointed out the differences between the projects. On January 16, 2009, Google announced that Knol had grown to 100,000 articles, and users from 197 countries visited Knol on an average day. Since then, the Public Library of Science Currents: Influenza and the Harvard University-sponsored forum for Healthcare Information Technology Platform have utilized Knol-based collections for rapid exchange of research. On November 22, 2011, Google announced that Knol was to be phased out in favor of Annotum. It was closed on April 30, 2012, and all content was deleted by October 1, 2012.

— Freebase

Silver Stripping Bath

Silver Stripping Bath

Various baths are used to remove silver from old electroplated articles. Their composition depends upon the base on which the metal is deposited. Silvered iron articles are placed as anodes in a solution of 1 part potassium cyanide in 20 parts of water. As kathode a silver anode or a copper one lightly oiled may be used. From the latter the silver easily rubs off. For copper articles a mixture of fuming sulphuric acid and nitric acid (40º Beaumé) may be used. The presence of any water in this mixture will bring about the solution of the copper. Or fuming sulphuric acid may be heated to between 300º and 400º F., some pinches of dry pulverized potassium nitrate may be thrown in and the articles at once dipped. These methods effect the solution of the silver, leaving the copper unattacked.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

Hexagonal

Hexagonal

having six sides and six angles; six-sided

— Webster Dictionary

Senary

Senary

of six; belonging to six; containing six

— Webster Dictionary

Tuscaroras

Tuscaroras

a tribe of North American Indians formerly living on the Neuse and Tar rivers in North Carolina. They were conquered in 1713, after which the remnant of the tribe joined the Five Nations, thus forming the Six Nations. See Six Nations, under Six

— Webster Dictionary

limiting adjective

limiting adjective

an adjective that limits a noun; they include definite articles, indefinite articles, possessive adjectives, demonstrative adjectives, indefinite adjectives, interrogative adjectives, cardinal adjectives, ordinal adjectives, proper adjectives and nouns used as adjectives

— Wiktionary

sporgery

sporgery

The disruptive act of posting a flood of articles to a newsgroup, the article headers having been falsified so as to make the articles appear to have been posted by people other than the true poster.

— Wiktionary

bibliographic database

bibliographic database

An electronic index to journal or magazine articles, containing citations, abstracts and often either the full text of the articles, or links to the full text.

— Wiktionary

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An antonym for "curdled"
  • A. grumous
  • B. thin
  • C. coagulated
  • D. solidified