Synonyms containing slavey people

We've found 24,241 synonyms:

Popular

Popular

pop′ū-lar, adj. pertaining to the people: pleasing to, or prevailing among, the people: enjoying the favour of the people: easily understood: inferior: (Shak.) vulgar.—n. Popularisā′tion.—v.t. Pop′ularise, to make popular or suitable to the people: to spread among the people.—ns. Pop′ulariser; Popular′ity, Pop′ularness, quality or state of being popular or pleasing to the people: favour with the people: a desire to obtain favour with the people.—adv. Pop′ularly.—v.t. Pop′ulāte, to people: to furnish with inhabitants.—v.i. to increase in numbers.—adj. populous.—n. Populā′tion, act of populating: the number of the inhabitants of any place.—adj. Pop′ulous, full of people: numerously inhabited: (Shak.) numerous.—adv. Pop′ulously.—n. Pop′ulousness. [Fr. populaire—L. popularispopulus, the people.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Folk

Folk

fōk, n. people, collectively or distributively: a nation or race (rarely in pl.): (arch.) the people, commons: (pl.) those of one's own family, relations (coll.):—generally used in pl. Folk or Folks (fōks).—ns. Folke′thing, the lower house of the Danish parliament or Rigsdag; Folk′land, among the Anglo-Saxons, public land as distinguished from boc-land (bookland)—i.e. land granted to private persons by a written charter; Folk′lore, a department of the study of antiquities or archæology, embracing everything relating to ancient observances and customs, to the notions, beliefs, traditions, superstitions, and prejudices of the common people—the science which treats of the survivals of archaic beliefs and customs in modern ages (the name Folklore was first suggested by W. J. Thoms—'Ambrose Merton'—in the Athenæum, August 22, 1846); Folk′lorist, one who studies folklore; Folk′mote, an assembly of the people among the Anglo-Saxons; Folk′-right, the common law or right of the people; Folk′-song, any song or ballad originating among the people and traditionally handed down by them: a song written in imitation of such; Folk′-speech, the dialect of the common people of a country, in which ancient idioms are embedded; Folk′-tale, a popular story handed down by oral tradition from a more or less remote antiquity. [A.S. folc; Ice. fólk; Ger. volk.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

People

People

pē′pl, n. persons generally: the men, women, and children of a country or a nation: the mass of persons as distinguished from the rulers, &c.: an indefinite number: inhabitants: the vulgar: the populace:—pl. Peoples (pē′plz), races, tribes.—v.t. to stock with people or inhabitants.—People's palace, an institution for the amusement, recreation, and association of the working-classes, as that in the East End of London, inaugurated in 1887.—Chosen people, the Israelites; Good people, or folk, a popular euphemistic name for the fairies; Peculiar people (see Peculiar); The people, the populace, the mass. [Fr. peuple—L. populus, prob. reduplicated from root of plebs, people.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Slavey

Slavey

The Slavey language

— Wiktionary

Public

Public

pub′lik, adj. of or belonging to the people: pertaining to a community or a nation: general: common to or shared in by all: generally known.—n. the people: the general body of mankind: the people, indefinitely: a public-house, tavern.—ns. Pub′lican, the keeper of an inn or public-house: (orig.) a farmer-general of the Roman taxes: a tax-collector; Publicā′tion, the act of publishing or making public: a proclamation: the act of printing and sending out for sale, as a book: that which is published as a book, &c.—ns.pl. Pub′lic-bills, -laws, &c., bills, laws, &c. which concern the interests of the whole people; Pub′lic-funds, money lent to government for which interest is paid of a stated amount at a stated time.—ns. Pub′lic-house, a house open to the public: one chiefly used for selling beer and other liquors: an inn or tavern; Pub′lic-institū′tion, an institution kept up by public funds for the public use, as an educational or charitable foundation; Pub′licist, one who writes on or is skilled in public law, or on current political topics; Public′ity, the state of being public or open to the knowledge of all: notoriety; Pub′lic-law (see International).—adv. Pub′licly.—adjs. Pub′lic-mind′ed, -spir′ited, having a spirit actuated by regard to the public interest: with a regard to the public interest.—ns. Pub′licness; Pub′lic-opin′ion, the view which the people of a district or county take of any question of public interest; Pub′lic-pol′icy, the main principles or spirit upon which the law of a country is constructed; Pub′lic-spir′it, a strong desire and effort to work on behalf of the public interest.—adv. Pub′lic-spir′itedly.—n. Pub′lic-spir′itedness.—n.pl. Pub′lic-works, permanent works or improvements made for public use or benefit.—Public health, the department in any government, municipality, &c. which superintends sanitation; Public holiday, a general holiday ordained by parliament; Public lands, lands belonging to government, esp. such as are open to sale, grant, &c.; Public orator, an officer of English universities who is the voice of the Senate upon all public occasions; Public school (see School).—In public, in open view. [Fr.,—L. publicuspopulus, the people.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sahtu

Sahtu

The Sahtú or North Slavey (historically called Hare or Hareskin Indians) are a Dene First Nations people of the Athabaskan-speaking ethnolinguistic group living in the vicinity of Great Bear Lake (Sahtú, the source of their name), Northwest Territories, Canada. The Sahtú peoples live in Colville Lake, Deline, Fort Good Hope, Norman Wells and Tulita which form the Sahtu Region of the NWT. The Dene of the region are represented by the Sahtu Dene Council who, in 1993, signed the Sahtu Dene and Metis Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement. Sahtú groups include the Hare Dene (K'ahsho Got'ine District, today: Colville Lake and Fort Good Hope), Bear Lake Dene (Déline District), and Mountain Dene (Tulit'a District). They call themselves also Ɂehdzo Got’ı̨ne (Trap People).

— Wikipedia

Healthy People Programs

Healthy People Programs

Healthy People Programs are a set of health objectives to be used by governments, communities, professional organizations, and others to help develop programs to improve health. It builds on initiatives pursued over the past two decades beginning with the 1979 Surgeon General's Report, Healthy People, Healthy People 2000: National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives, and Healthy People 2010. These established national health objectives and served as the basis for the development of state and community plans. These are administered by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP). Similar programs are conducted by other national governments.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Common

Common

kom′un, adj. belonging equally to more than one: public: general: usual: frequent: ordinary: easy to be had: of little value: vulgar: of low degree.—n. (Shak.) the commonalty: a tract of open land, used in common by the inhabitants of a town, parish, &c.—v.i. (Shak.) to share.—adj. Common′able, held in common.—ns. Comm′onage, right of pasturing on a common: the right of using anything in common: a common; Comm′onalty, the general body of the people without any distinction of rank or authority; Comm′oner, one of the common people, as opposed to the nobles: a member of the House of Commons: at Oxford, a student who pays for his commons.—adv. Comm′only.—ns. Comm′onness; Comm′onplace, a common topic or subject: a platitude: a memorandum: a note.—adj. common: hackneyed.—v.i. to make notes: to put in a commonplace-book.—n. Comm′onplace-book, a note or memorandum book.—n.pl. Comm′ons, the common people: their representatives—i.e. the lower House of Parliament or House of Commons: common land: food at a common table: at Oxford, rations served at a fixed rate from the college buttery: food in general, rations.—n. Comm′on-sense, average understanding: good sense or practical sagacity: the opinion of a community: the universally admitted impressions of mankind.—Common Bench, Common Pleas, one of the divisions of the High Court of Justice; Common forms, the ordinary clauses which are of frequent occurrence in identical terms in writs and deeds; Common law, in England, the ancient customary law of the land; Common Prayer (Book of), the liturgy of the Church of England; Common-riding, the Scotch equivalent of Beating the Bounds (see Beat); Common room, in schools, colleges, &c., a room to which the members have common access.—In common, together: equally with others.—Make common cause with, to cast in one's lot with: to have the same interests and aims with.—Philosophy of common-sense, that school of philosophy which takes the universally admitted impressions of mankind as corresponding to the facts of things without any further scrutiny.—Short commons, scant fare, insufficient supply of rations.—The common, that which is common or usual; The common good, the interest of the community at large: the corporate property of a burgh in Scotland; The common people, the people in general. [Fr. commun—L. communis, prob. from com, together, and munis, serving, obliging.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Dene

Dene

The Dene people are an aboriginal group of First Nations who live in the northern boreal and Arctic regions of Canada. The Dené speak Northern Athabaskan languages. Dene is the common Athabaskan word for "people". The term "Dene" has two usages. More commonly, it is used narrowly to refer to the Athabaskan speakers of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut in Canada, especially including the Chipewyan, Tlicho, Yellowknives, Slavey, and Sahtu. But it is sometimes also used to refer to all Northern Athabaskan speakers, who are spread in a wide range all across Alaska and northern Canada. Note that Dene never includes the Pacific Coast Athabaskan or Southern Athabaskan speakers in the continental U.S., despite the fact that the term is used to denote the Athabaskan languages as a whole. The Southern Athabaskan speakers do, however, refer to themselves with similar words: Diné and Indé. Alexander Mackenzie described aspects of a number of northern Dene cultures in the late eighteenth century in his journal of his voyage down the Mackenzie River.

— Freebase

Popular

Popular

beloved or approved by the people; pleasing to people in general, or to many people; as, a popular preacher; a popular law; a popular administration

— Webster Dictionary

Great Slave Lake

Great Slave Lake

Great Slave Lake is the second-largest lake in the Northwest Territories of Canada, the deepest lake in North America at 614 metres, and the ninth-largest lake in the world. It is 480 km long and 19 to 109 km wide. It covers an area of 27,200 km² in the southern part of the territory. Its given volume ranges from 1,070 km³ to 1,580 km³ and up to 2,088 km³ making it the 10th or 12th largest. The lake shares its name with the Slavey First Nations. Towns situated on the lake include: Yellowknife, Hay River, Behchoko, Fort Resolution, Lutselk'e, Hay River Reserve, Dettah and N'Dilo. The only community in the East Arm is Lutselk'e, a hamlet of about 350 people, largely Chipewyan Aboriginals of the Dene Nation and the now abandoned winter camp/Hudson's Bay Company post, Fort Reliance.

— Freebase

Slavey people

Slavey people

The Slavey are a First Nations aboriginal people of the Dene group, indigenous to the Great Slave Lake region, in Canada's Northwest Territories, and extending into northeastern British Columbia and northwestern Alberta.

— Freebase

Slave River

Slave River

The Slave River is a Canadian river that flows from Lake Athabasca in northeastern Alberta and empties into Great Slave Lake in the Northwest Territories. The river's name is thought to derive from the name for the Slavey group of the Dene First Nations, Deh Gah Got'ine, in the Athabaskan language, and has nothing to do with slavery. The Chipewyan had displaced other native people from this region.

— Freebase

Slavey

Slavey

The Slavey are a First Nations aboriginal people of the Dene group, indigenous to the Great Slave Lake region, in Canada's Northwest Territories, and extending into northeastern British Columbia and northwestern Alberta.

— Freebase

Democracy

Democracy

de-mok′ra-si, n. a form of government in which the supreme power is vested in the people collectively, and is administered by them or by officers appointed by them: the people, esp. the common people in the United States, the democratic party—also Democ′raty (Milt.).—n. Dem′ocrat, one who adheres to or promotes democracy as a principle: a member of the democratic party in the United States, who preserve carefully the local liberties of states and of individuals, opposing national centralisation, and supporting a wide franchise, low tariff duties for the interests of the revenue rather than protection, and a limited public expenditure.—adjs. Democrat′ic, -al, relating to democracy: insisting on equal rights and privileges for all.—adv. Democrat′ically.—adj. Democratifī′able, capable of being made democratic.—v.t. Democratise′, to render democratic.—n. Democ′ratist, a democrat. [O. Fr.,—Gr. dēmokratiadēmos, the people, and kratein, to rule—kratos, strength.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

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