Synonyms containing slip down

We've found 9,233 synonyms:

Down

Down

down, adv. from a higher to a lower position: on the ground: from earlier to later times: from thick to thin, from large to small (to boil down, to cut down): from more to less (to beat down a price).—prep. along a descent: from a higher to a lower position or state.—v.t. to knock down: to dispirit—also used as a kind of interjection, with get, go, come, kneel, &c. understood.—n. a tendency to be down upon, a grudge against: a descent, reverse of fortune.—v.i. Down′-bear, to bear or press down.—adj. Down′cast, dejected.—ns. Down′come, a fall, ruin, a heavy pour of rain; Down′-draught, a current of air downwards; Down′-east′er, one living 'down east' from the speaker, a New Englander, and esp. an inhabitant of Maine; Down′fall, fall, failure, humiliation, ruin: a falling down, as of rain.—adjs. Down′fallen, ruined; Down′-gyved (Shak.), hanging down like fetters.—n. Down′-haul, a rope by which a jib, &c., is hauled down when set.—adjs. Down′-heart′ed, dejected; Down′hill, descending, sloping.—n. Down′-line, the line of a railway leading from the capital, or other important centre, to the provinces.—adj. Down′looked (Dryden), downcast, gloomy.—ns. Down′-ly′ing, time of retiring to rest: a woman's lying-in; Down′pour, a heavy fall of rain, &c.—adv. Down′right (obs.), perpendicular: in plain terms: utterly.—adj. plain spoken: brusque: utter (as in downright madness).—ns. Down′rightness; Down′rush, a rushing down (as of gas, hot air, &c.); Down′-set′ting, a setting down, a snub; Down′-sit′ting, sitting down, time of rest (Ps. cxxxix. 2).—advs. Down′stairs, in, or to, a lower story; Down′-stream, with the current.—ns. Down′-throw, act of throwing down, state of being thrown down: a sinking of strata below the level of the surrounding beds; Down′-train, a railway train proceeding from the chief terminus.—adj. Down′-trodden, trampled on, tyrannised over.—advs. Down′ward, Down′wards, from higher to lower: from source to outlet: from more ancient to modern: in the lower part.—adj. Down′ward.—Down east (U.S.), in or into Maine and adjoining parts of New England; Down in the mouth, in low spirits; Down on one's luck, in ill-luck; Down south, in the southern states; Down to the country, away into the country, from London (hence 'down to the Derby,' 'down to Scotland'); Down with your money, lay it down, pay it.—A down-train, a train away from London.—Lay down the law, to expound authoritatively. [A corr. of M. E. a-dawn, adun—A.S. of dúne, 'from the h

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Slip

Slip

slip, v.i. to slide or glide along: to move out of place: to escape: to err: to slink: to enter by oversight.—v.t. to cause to slide: to convey secretly: to omit: to throw off: to let loose: to escape from: to part from the branch or stem:—pr.p. slip′ping; pa.t. and pa.p. slipped.—n. act of slipping: that on which anything may slip: an error, a fault, a slight transgression: an escape: a twig: a strip, a narrow piece of anything: a leash: a smooth inclined plane, sloping down to the water, on which a ship is built: anything easily slipped on: (print.) a long galley-proof before being made up into pages.—ns. Slip′-board, a board sliding in grooves; Slip′-dock, a dock having a floor that slopes so that the lower end is submerged; Slip′-knot, a knot which slips along the rope or line round which it is made; Slip′per, a loose shoe easily slipped on.—adj. (Spens.) slippery.—adj. Slip′pered, wearing slippers.—adv. Slip′perily, in a slippery manner.—ns. Slip′periness, Slip′piness.—adjs. Slip′pery, Slip′py, apt to slip away: smooth: not affording firm footing or confidence: unstable: uncertain; Slip′shod, shod with slippers, or shoes down at the heel like slippers: careless.—n. Slip′stitch.—Slip off, to take off noiselessly or hastily; Slip on, to put on loosely or in haste; Slip one's breath, or wind, to die; Slip the leash, to disengage one's self from a noose.—Give a person the slip, to escape stealthily from him. [A.S. slípan; Sw. slippa, Dut. slippen, to glide, Ger. schliefen.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Transtension

Transtension

Transtension is the state in which a rock mass or area of the Earth's crust experiences both extensive and transtensive shear. As such, transtensional regions are characterised by both extensional structures (normal faults, grabens) and wrench structures (strike-slip faults). In general, many tectonic regimes that were previously defined as simple strike-slip shear zones are actually transtensional. It is unlikely that a deforming body will experience 'pure' extension or 'pure' strike-slip. Transtensional shear zones are characterized by the co-existence of different structures, related to both strike-slip shear and extension. End member structures include pure strike-slip faults and purely extensional ("normal") dip-slip faults. Faults which have components of both (termed 'oblique' slip faults) are abundant.

— Wikipedia

Slip ratio

Slip ratio

Slip ratio is a means of calculating and expressing the slipping behavior of the wheel of an automobile. It is of fundamental importance in the field of vehicle dynamics, as it allows to understand the relationship between the deformation of the tire and the longitudinal forces (i.e. the forces responsible for forward acceleration and braking) acting upon it. Furthermore, it is essential to the effectiveness of any anti-lock braking system. When accelerating or braking a vehicle equipped with tires, the observed angular velocity of the tire does not match the expected velocity for pure rolling motion, which means there appears to be apparent sliding between outer surface of the rim and the road in addition to rolling due to deformation of the part of tire above the area in contact with the road. When driving on dry pavement the fraction of slip that is caused by actual sliding taking place between road and tire contact patch is negligible in magnitude and thus does not in practice make slip ratio dependent on speed. It is only relevant in soft or slippery surfaces, like snow, mud, ice, etc and results constant speed difference in same road and load conditions independently of speed, and thus fraction of slip ratio due to that cause is inversely related to speed of the vehicle. The difference between theoretically calculated forward speed based on angular speed of the rim and rolling radius, and actual speed of the vehicle, expressed as a percentage of the latter, is called ‘slip ratio’. This slippage is caused by the forces at the contact patch of the tire, not the opposite way, and is thus of fundamental importance to determine the accelerations a vehicle can produce. There is no universally agreed upon definition of slip ratio. The SAE J670 definition is, for tires pointing straight ahead: S l i p R a t i o % = ( Ω R C V − 1 ) × 100 % {\displaystyle Slip\ Ratio\ \%=\left({\frac {\Omega \,R_{C}}{V}}-1\right)\times 100\%} Where Ω is the angular velocity of the wheel, RC is the effective radius of the corresponding free-rolling tire, which can be calculated from the revolutions per kilometer, and V is the forward velocity of the vehicle.

— Wikipedia

Slipware

Slipware

Slipware is a type of pottery identified by its primary decorating process where slip was placed onto the leather-hard clay body surface by dipping, painting or splashing. Slip is an aqueous suspension of a clay body, which is a mixture of clays and other minerals such as quartz, feldspar and mica. A coating of white or coloured slip, known as an engobe, can be applied to the article to improve its appearance, to give a smoother surface to a rough body, mask an inferior colour or for decorative effect. Slips or engobes can also be applied by painting techniques, in isolation or in several layers and colours. Sgraffito involves scratching through a layer of coloured slip to reveal a different colour or the base body underneath. Several layers of slip and/or sgraffito can be done while the pot is still in an unfired state. One colour of slip can be fired, before a second is applied, and prior to the scratching or incising decoration. This is particularly useful if the base body is not of the desired colour or texture. Some prehistoric and historic cultures used slip as the primary decorating material on their ware. These include most prehistoric cultures of the Middle East, cultures in many areas of Africa, most pottery-making cultures in the Americas, early Japanese and Korean ware, Mycenean ware, the pottery of Ancient Greece and pre-industrialized potters in some areas of Great Britain, most notably Thomas Toft in the Staffordshire Potteries. Later cultures combined the use of slip with the application of high silica glazes.

— Freebase

Transpression

Transpression

In geology, transpression occurs when a region of the Earth's crust experiences strike-slip shear and a component of shortening, resulting in oblique shear. Transpression typically occurs at a regional scale along plate boundaries characterized by oblique convergence. More locally, transpression can occur along strike-slip fault zones that are not perfectly planar. Many tectonic régimes previously defined as simple strike-slip shear zones are actually transpressional. It is generally very unlikely that a deforming body will experience "pure" shortening or "pure" strike-slip. Transpressional shear zones are characterized by the co-existence of different structures, related to both strike-slip shear and shortening. End-member structures include pure strike-slip faults and pure thrust faults. Faults that have components of both are abundant. In addition, structures such as folds, tension fractures and Riedel shears all form in the shear zone, but at different angles to those observed in simple strike-slip fault zones.

— Freebase

Slip

Slip

Slip is a woman's undergarment worn beneath a dress or skirt to help it hang smoothly and to prevent chafing of the skin from coarse fabrics such as wool. Slips are also worn for warmth, and to protect fine fabrics from perspiration. A full slip hangs from the shoulders, usually by means of narrow straps, and extends from the breast to the fashionable skirt length. A half slip hangs from the waist. It may also be called a waist slip or more rarely a petticoat. Slips are often worn to prevent the show through of intimate undergarments such as panties or a brassiere. A slip may also be used to prevent a silhouette of the legs showing through clothing when standing in front of a bright light source. Other uses for slips are to make a dress or skirt hang properly, the prevention of chafing to the skin, to protect the outer garment from damage due to perspiration, or for warmth, especially if the dress or skirt is lightweight and thin. In very warm and/or humid climates a slip made from 100% cotton may be desired.

— Freebase

Down Down

Down Down

"Down Down" is a popular song by the English rock band, Status Quo. Written by Francis Rossi and Bob Young and produced by Status Quo, "Down Down" was Status Quo's only number one single in the UK Singles Chart to date. "Down Down" spent a week at the top of the chart in January 1975. The single was first released on 29 November 1974 on the Vertigo label, paired with the B-side song "Nightride". Both songs came from the album On The Level which had yet to be released. The album version lasts 5 minutes and 24 seconds and the single version 3 minutes and 49 seconds. Originally it was entitled "Get Down", but this was changed before release, possibly to avoid confusion with the Gilbert O'Sullivan song of the same name. Towards the end of his life, DJ John Peel was known for playing "Down Down" as part of his eclectic DJ sets. In 1986 co-writer Bob Young released a country music style version of "Down Down" on his solo album In Quo Country. In July 2012 Status Quo reworked the lyrics to create a 3-minute promotional song for the Australian supermarket chain Coles. The chorus chants, "down, down, prices are down". This was released on television and YouTube.

— Freebase

Slipcasting

Slipcasting

Slipcasting is a technique for the mass-production of pottery, especially for shapes not easily made on a wheel. A liquid clay body slip is poured into plaster moulds and allowed to form a layer, the cast, on the inside cavity of the mould. In a solid cast mould, ceramic objects such as handles and platters are surrounded by plaster on all sides with a reservoir for slip, and are removed when the solid piece is held within. For a hollow cast mould, once the plaster has absorbed most of the liquid from the outside layer of clay the remaining slip is poured off for later use. The cast piece is removed from the mould, "fettled" and allowed to dry. This produces a greenware piece which is then dried before firing, with or without decoration and glaze. The technique is suited to the production of complex shapes, and is commonly used for sanitaryware, such as toilets and basins, and smaller pieces like figurines and teapots. The technique can also be used for small-scale production runs or to produce limited editions of objects. The French for slip is barbotine, and "barbotine pottery" is sometimes used for 19th century French and American pottery with added slipcast decoration.

— Freebase

Pink slip

Pink slip

Pink slip refers to the American practice, by a personnel department, of including a discharge notice in an employee's pay envelope to notify the worker of his or her termination of employment or layoff. Receiving a "pink slip" has become a metaphor for the termination of employment in general. According to an article in The New York Times, the editors of the Random House Dictionary have dated the term to at least as early as 1910. Pink slips came back into the news circa 2009, with the layoffs following the financial crisis of 2007–2008. The origin of the phrase is undetermined, and there is no evidence that termination notices are, or ever were, conventionally printed on pink-colored paper. In the UK and Ireland the equivalent of a pink slip is a P45; in Belgium the equivalent is known as a C4. The term pink slip may also relate to the fact that many applications are done in triplicate form, with the dismissed employee receiving the pink copy.

— Freebase

Slip ring

Slip ring

A slip ring is an electromechanical device that allows the transmission of power and electrical signals from a stationary to a rotating structure. A slip ring can be used in any electromechanical system that requires unrestrained, intermittent or continuous rotation while transmitting power and / or data. It can improve mechanical performance, simplify system operation and eliminate damage-prone wires dangling from movable joints. Also called rotary electrical interfaces, rotating electrical connectors, collectors, swivels, or electrical rotary joints, these rings are commonly found in slip ring motors, electrical generators for alternating current systems and alternators and in packaging machinery, cable reels, and wind turbines. They can be used on any rotating object to transfer power, control circuits, or analog or digital signals including data such as those found on aerodrome beacons, rotating tanks, power shovels, radio telescopes or heliostats. A slip ring is a method of making an electrical connection through a rotating assembly. Formally, it is an electric transmission device that allows energy flow between two electrical rotating parts, such as in a motor.

— Freebase

punchboard

punchboard

a small board full of holes; each hole contains a slip of paper with symbols printed on it; a gambler pays a small sum for the privilege of pushing out a slip in the hope of obtaining one that entitles him to a prize

— Princeton's WordNet

Dord

Dord

The word dord is a dictionary error in lexicography. It was accidentally created, as a ghost word, by the staff of G. and C. Merriam Company (now part of Merriam-Webster) in the New International Dictionary, second edition (1934). That dictionary defined the term a synonym for density used in physics and chemistry in the following way: "dord (dôrd), n. Physics & Chem. Density."Philip Babcock Gove, an editor at Merriam-Webster who became editor-in-chief of Webster's Third New International Dictionary, wrote a letter to the journal American Speech, fifteen years after the error was caught, in which he explained how the "dord" error was introduced and corrected.On July 31, 1931, Austin M. Patterson, the dictionary's chemistry editor, sent in a slip reading "D or d, cont./density." This was intended to add "density" to the existing list of words that the letter "D" can abbreviate. The phrase "D or d" was misinterpreted as a single, run-together word: Dord. This was a plausible mistake, because headwords on slips were typed with spaces between the letters, so "D or d" looked very much like "D o r d". The original slip went missing, so a new slip was prepared for the printer, which assigned a part of speech (noun) and a pronunciation. The would-be word was not questioned or corrected by proofreaders. The entry appeared on page 771 of the dictionary around 1934, between the entries for Dorcopsis (a type of small kangaroo) and doré (golden in color).On February 28, 1939, an editor noticed "dord" lacked an etymology and investigated, discovering the error. An order was sent to the printer marked "plate change/imperative/urgent". The non-word "dord" was excised, "density" was added as an additional meaning for the abbreviation "D or d" as originally intended, and the definition of the adjacent entry "Doré furnace" was expanded from "A furnace for refining dore bullion" to "a furnace in which dore bullion is refined" to close up the space. Gove wrote that this was "probably too bad, for why shouldn't dord mean 'density'?" In 1940, bound books began appearing without the ghost word, although inspection of printed copies well into the 1940s show "dord" still present. The entry "dord" was not completely removed until 1947.

— Wikipedia

Starting blocks

Starting blocks

Starting blocks are a device used in the sport of track and field by sprint athletes to brace their feet against at the start of a race so they do not slip as they stride forwards at the sound of the starter's pistol. The blocks also enable the sprinters to adopt a more efficient starting posture and isometrically preload their muscles in an enhanced manner. This allows them to start more powerfully and increases their overall sprint speed capability. For most levels of competition, including the whole of high level international competition, starting blocks are mandatory equipment for the start of sprint races. Their invention is credited to Australian Charlie Booth and his father in 1929. Prior to this, runners would dig holes in the dirt track. Trowels were provided at the start of races. This was not the most consistent or stable system. It also was destructive to the track surface with the holes having to be filled for subsequent runners. When George Simpson became the first person to run 9.4 seconds for the 100-yard dash in 1930, his record was disallowed because he used starting blocks.Wood was the first material used, with some tracks having permanently placed wooden starting blocks as built in structures at the start line. Portable blocks were held by long metal spikes that needed to be pounded into the ground. These devices evolved to metal blocks. The common blocks of the 1960s were heavy and adjusted by screws that were frequently broken or became rusted over the years. Lighter weight blocks were made of sheet metal. Nick Newton's innovative design uses cast aluminum. The rubberized surfaces of new all-weather running tracks that became common starting in the 1970s, made the old blocks even less secure. Original Tartan tracks left long holes to secure the blocks but most tracks today require blocks to be held by small spikes similar to the ones used in shoes. Block slippage was common enough that it is an allowable loophole in the rules to recall the start of a race without calling a false start against an athlete whose blocks slip. In some amateur settings, such as high school track, since block slippage is much more common due to lower quality track surface material and/or starting blocks' spike quality, it is a commonly accepted practice to allow another person (usually a teammate) to sit on the ground behind the starting block and place their feet behind each block, using their leg power to further reduce the chance for the blocks to slip back upon the runner launching out of them. Generally most races of 400 meters or shorter allow athletes to use starting blocks. Most runners in the 800 meters at the 1956 Olympics used starting blocks from a waterfall start. Modern blocks used for world records now must have sensors that detect the pressure from the athlete and can be used to time their reaction to the starting gun. Athletes who react faster than 1/10th of a second can be charged with a false start and the race recalled. Many also carry electronic speakers so the sound of the gun arrives at the ears of the athletes at exactly the same time. Some races for hearing-impaired athletes have also used starting light systems, similar to motorsport's Christmas Tree.

— Wikipedia

slip

slip

An inclined plane by the water side, on which a ship may be built. There are also slips up which vessels may be drawn for receiving repairs. Also, a short memorandum of the proposed insurance of a ship, which is sometimes offered to the underwriters for subscription, previous to the effecting of a policy. Also, in steam navigation, the difference between the pitch of the propelling screw, and the space through which the screw actually progresses in the water, during one revolution.--To slip, is to let go the cable with a buoy on the end, and quit the position, from any sudden requirement, instead of weighing the anchor.--To slip by the board. To slip down by the ship's side.

— Dictionary of Nautical Terms

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. defuse
  • B. merge
  • C. combine
  • D. aggregate