Synonyms containing smoke ring

We've found 3,607 synonyms:

Smoke

Smoke

smōk, n. the vapour from a burning body—a common term for the volatile products of the imperfect combustion of such organic substances as wood or coal.—v.i. to emit smoke: to smoke out instead of upward, owing to imperfect draught: to draw in and puff out the smoke of tobacco: to raise smoke by moving rapidly: to burn, to rage: to suffer, as from punishment.—v.t. to apply smoke to: to dry, scent, or medicate by smoke: to inhale the smoke of: to use in smoking: to try to expel by smoking: to scent out, discover: to quiz, ridicule: to thrash.—ns. Smoke′-black, lampblack; Smoke′-board, a board suspended before the upper part of a fireplace to prevent the smoke coming out into the room; Smoke′-box, part of a steam-boiler where the smoke is collected before passing out at the chimney; Smoke′-consū′mer, an apparatus for burning all the smoke from a fire.—adj. Smoke′-dried.—v.t. Smoke′-dry, to cure or dry by means of smoke.—ns. Smoke′-house, a building where meat or fish is cured by smoking, or where smoked meats are stored; Smoke′-jack, a contrivance for turning a jack by means of a wheel turned by the current of air ascending a chimney.—adj. Smoke′less, destitute of smoke.—adv. Smokel′essly.—ns. Smoke′lessness; Smō′ker, one who smokes tobacco: a smoking-carriage: one who smoke-dries meat: an evening entertainment at which smoking is permitted; Smoke′-sail, a small sail hoisted between the galley-funnel and the foremast when a vessel rides head to the wind; Smoke′-shade, a scale of tints ranging from 0 to 10, for comparison of different varieties of coal, according to the amount of unburnt carbon in their smoke; Smoke′-stack, an upright pipe through which the combustion-gases from a steam-boiler pass into the open air.—adj. Smoke′-tight, impervious to smoke.—ns. Smoke′-tree, an ornamental shrub of the cashew family, with long light feathery or cloud-like fruit-stalks; Smoke′-wash′er, an apparatus for removing soot and particles of unburnt carbon from smoke by making it pass through water; Smoke′-wood, the virgin's bower (Clematis Vitalba), whose porous stems are smoked by boys.—adv. Smō′kily.—ns. Smō′kiness; Smō′king, the act of emitting smoke: the act or habit of drawing into the mouth and emitting the fumes of tobacco by means of a pipe or cigar—a habit of great sedative value: a bantering; Smō′king-cap, -jack′et, a light ornamental cap or jacket often worn by smokers; Smō′king-carr′iage, -room, a railway-carriage, -room, supposed to be set apart for smokers.—adj. Smō′ky, giving out smoke: like smoke: filled, or subject to be filled, with smoke: tarnished or noisome with smoke: (obs.) suspicious.—On a smoke (B.), smoking, or on fire

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Ring

Ring

ring, n. a circle: a small hoop, usually of metal, worn on the finger or in the ear as an ornament: a circular area for races, &c.: a circular course, a revolution: a clique organised to control the market: an arena or prize-ring: the commercial measure of staves for casks: (archit.) a cincture round a column: (anat.) an annulus: a group or combination of persons.—v.t. to encircle: to fit with a ring: to surround: to wed with a ring: (hort.) to cut out a ring of bark from a tree.—v.i. to move in rings.—ns. Ring′-ar′mature, an armature in which the coils of wire are wound round a ring; Ring′-arm′our, armour made of metal rings (see Chain-mail).—v.t. Ring′-bark, to strip a ring of bark round a tree to kill it.—ns. Ring′bill, the ring-necked duck; Ring′-bolt, an iron bolt with a ring through a hole at one end; Ring′bone, in farriery, a bony callus on a horse's pastern-bone, the result of inflammation: the condition caused by this; Ring′-bunt′ing, the reed-bunting; Ring′-carr′ier, a go-between; Ring′-dī′al, a portable sun-dial; Ring′-dog, an iron apparatus for hauling timber; Ring′-dott′erel, the ringed plover; Ring′dove, the cushat or wood-pigeon, so called from a white ring or line on the neck; Ring′-drop′ping, a trick practised by rogues upon simple people.—adj. Ringed, surrounded as with a ring, annulose, annulate: wearing a wedding-ring.—ns. Ringed′-car′pet, a British geometrid moth; Ring′-fence, a fence continuously encircling an estate, a limit; Ring′-fing′er, the third finger of the left hand, on which women wear their marriage-ring.—adj. Ring′-formed, annular.—ns. Ring′-frame, any one of a class of spinning-machines with vertical spindles; Ring′-gauge, a measure consisting of a ring of fixed size used for measuring spherical objects; Ring′leader, the head of a riotous body: one who opens a ball; Ring′let, a little ring: a curl, esp. of hair.—adj. Ring′leted.—ns. Ring′lock, a puzzle-lock; Ring′-mail, chain-armour; Ring′man, the third finger of the hand: one interested in the prize-ring; Ring′-mas′ter, one who has charge of a circus-ring and the performances in it; Ring′-mon′ey, rudely formed rings anciently used for money; Ring′-neck, a kind of ring-plover: the ring-necked duck; Ring′-net, a net for catching butterflies; Ring′-ou′sel, a species of thrush, with a white band on the breast; Ring′-parr′ot, a common Indian parrot; Ring′-perch, the perch of North America; Ring′-plov′er, a ring-necked plover; Ring′-rope, a

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Smoke ring

Smoke ring

A smoke ring is a visible vortex ring formed by smoke in a clear atmosphere. Smokers may blow smoke rings from the mouth, intentionally or accidentally. Smoke rings may also be formed by sudden bursts of fire, by shaking a smoke source up and down, by firing certain types of artillery, or by the use of special devices, such as vortex ring toys. The head of a mushroom cloud is a large smoke ring. A smoke ring is commonly formed when a puff of smoke is suddenly injected into clear air, especially through a narrow opening. The outer parts of the puff are slowed down by the still air relative to the central part, imparting it the characteristic poloidal flow pattern. The smoke makes the ring visible, but does not significantly affect the flow. The same phenomenon occurs with any fluid, creating vortex rings which are invisible but otherwise entirely similar to smoke rings. When blown in still air, a smoke ring usually travels roughly straight from the opening over a surprisingly large distance, maintaining its shape, until dispersed by turbulence or other interference.

— Freebase

Seal of Solomon

Seal of Solomon

The Seal of Solomon (or Ring of Solomon; Arabic: خاتم سليمان‎ Khātam Sulaymān) is the signet ring attributed to King Solomon in medieval Jewish tradition and in Islamic and Western occultism. It was often depicted in either a pentagram or hexagram shape; the latter also known as the Star of David in Jewish tradition. This ring variously gave Solomon the power to command demons, jinn (genies), or to speak with animals. Due to the proverbial wisdom of Solomon, his signet ring, or its supposed design, it came to be seen as an amulet or talisman, or a symbol or character in medieval and Renaissance-era magic, occultism, and alchemy. The legend of the Seal of Solomon was developed primarily by medieval Arabic writers, who related that the ring was engraved by God and was given to the king directly from heaven. The ring was made from brass and iron, and the two parts were used to seal written commands to good and evil spirits, respectively. In one tale, a demon—either Asmodeus or Sakhr—obtained possession of the ring and ruled in Solomon's stead for forty days. In a variant of the tale of the ring of Polycrates from Herodotus, the demon eventually threw the ring into the sea, where it was swallowed by a fish, caught by a fisherman, and served to Solomon.In Islamic eschatology, the Beast of the Earth is equipped with both the Staff of Moses and the Seal of Solomon and uses the latter to stamp the nose of the unbelievers.The date of origin legends surrounding the Seal of Solomon is difficult to establish. It is known that a legend of a magic ring with which the possessor could command demons was already current in the 1st century (Josephus 8.2 telling of one Eleazar who used such a ring in the presence of Vespasian), but the association of the name of Solomon with such a ring is medieval notwithstanding the 2nd century apocryphal text the Testament of Solomon. The Tractate Gittin (fol. 68) of the Mishnah has a story involving Solomon, Asmodeus, and a ring with the divine name engraved.The specification of the design of the seal as a hexagram seems to arise from a medieval Arab tradition. The name "Solomon's seal" was given to the hexagram engraved on the bottom of drinking-cups in Arab tradition. In the Arabian Nights (chapter 20), Sindbad presented Harun al-Rashid with such a cup, on which the "Table of Solomon" was engraved. Hexagrams feature prominently in Jewish esoteric literature from the early medieval period, and some authors have hypothesized that the tradition of Solomon's Seal may possibly predate Islam and date to early Rabbinical esoteric tradition, or to early alchemy in Hellenistic Judaism in 3rd-century Egypt, but there is no positive evidence for this, and most scholars assume that the symbol entered the Kabbalistic tradition of medieval Spain from Arabic literature. The representation as a pentagram, by contrast, seems to arise in the Western tradition of Renaissance magic (which was in turn strongly influenced by medieval Arab and Jewish occultism); White Kennett (1660–1728) makes reference to a "pentangle of Solomon" with the power of exorcising demons.The hexagram or "Star of David", which became a symbol of Judaism in the modern period and was placed on the flag of Israel in 1948, has its origins in 14th-century depictions of the Seal of Solomon. In 1354, King of Bohemia Charles IV prescribed for the Jews of Prague a red flag with both David's shield and Solomon's seal, while the red flag with which the Jews met King Matthias of Hungary in the 15th century showed two pentagrams with two golden stars.Peter de Abano's Heptameron (1496) makes reference to the "Pentacle of Solomon" (actually a hexagram drawn on the floor in which the magician has to stand) to invoke various demons.Lippmann Moses Büschenthal (d. 1818) wrote a tragedy with the title Der Siegelring Salomonis ("the signet-ring of Solomon"). An "Order of the Seal of Solomon" was established in 1874 in Ethiopia, where the ruling house claimed descent from Solomon. What distinguishes a Seal of Solomon from a Star of David is the two triangles are interlaced giving the appearance of a 3-dimensional figure. This was said in the Testament of Solomon to make demons confused and dizzy, unable to do Solomon any harm.

— Wikipedia

Smoke point

Smoke point

In cooking, the smoke point of an oil or fat is the temperature at which it begins to break down to glycerol and free fatty acids, and produce bluish smoke. The glycerol is then further broken down to acrolein which is a component of the smoke. It is the presence of the acrolein that causes the smoke to be extremely irritating to the eyes and throat. The smoke point also marks the beginning of both flavor and nutritional degradation. Therefore, it is a key consideration when selecting a fat for frying, with the smoke point of the specific oil dictating its maximum usable temperature and therefore its possible applications. For instance, since deep frying is a very high temperature process, it requires a fat with a high smoke point. The smoke point for an oil varies widely depending on origin and refinement. The smoke point of an oil does tend to increase as free fatty acid content decreases and degree of refinement increases. Heating oil produces free fatty acid and as heating time increases, more free fatty acids are produced, thereby decreasing smoke point. It is one reason not to use the same oil to deep fry more than twice. Intermittent frying has a markedly greater effect on oil deterioration than continuous frying.

— Freebase

Passive smoking

Passive smoking

Passive smoking is the inhalation of smoke, called second-hand smoke, or environmental tobacco smoke, by persons other than the intended "active" smoker. It occurs when tobacco smoke permeates any environment, causing its inhalation by people within that environment. Exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke causes disease, disability, and death. The health risks of second-hand smoke are a matter of scientific consensus. These risks have been a major motivation for smoke-free laws in workplaces and indoor public places, including restaurants, bars and night clubs, as well as some open public spaces. Concerns around second-hand smoke have played a central role in the debate over the harms and regulation of tobacco products. Since the early 1970s, the tobacco industry has viewed public concern over second-hand smoke as a serious threat to its business interests. Harm to bystanders was perceived as a motivator for stricter regulation of tobacco products. Despite the industry's awareness of the harms of second-hand smoke as early as the 1980s, the tobacco industry coordinated a scientific controversy with the aim of forestalling regulation of their products.

— Freebase

Smoke detector

Smoke detector

A smoke detector is a device that detects smoke, typically as an indicator of fire. Commercial, industrial, and mass residential devices issue a signal to a fire alarm system, while household detectors, known as smoke alarms, generally issue a local audible or visual alarm from the detector itself. Smoke detectors are typically housed in a disk-shaped plastic enclosure about 150 millimetres in diameter and 25 millimetres thick, but the shape can vary by manufacturer or product line. Most smoke detectors work either by optical detection or by physical process, while others use both detection methods to increase sensitivity to smoke. Sensitive alarms can be used to detect, and thus deter, smoking in areas where it is banned such as toilets and schools. Smoke detectors in large commercial, industrial, and residential buildings are usually powered by a central fire alarm system, which is powered by the building power with a battery backup. However, in many single family detached and smaller multiple family housings, a smoke alarm is often powered only by a single disposable battery. In the United States, the National Fire Protection Association estimates that nearly two-thirds of deaths from home fires occur in properties without working smoke alarms/detectors.

— Freebase

smoke

smoke

A particulate of solid or liquid particles dispersed into the air on the battlefield to degrade enemy ground or for aerial observation. Smoke has many uses--screening smoke, signaling smoke, smoke curtain, smoke haze, and smoke deception. Thus it is an artificial aerosol.

— Wiktionary

Infiltrometer

Infiltrometer

Infiltrometer is a device used to measure the rate of water infiltration into soil or other porous media. Commonly used infiltrometers are single ring or double ring infiltrometer, and also disc permeameter. The single ring involves driving a ring into the soil and supplying water in the ring either at constant head or falling head condition. Constant head refers to condition where the amount of water in the ring is always held constant. Because infiltration capacity is the maximum infiltration rate, and if infiltration rate exceeds the infiltration capacity, runoff will be the consequence, therefore maintaining constant head means the rate of water supplied corresponds to the infiltration capacity. The supplying of water is done with a Mariotte's bottle. Falling head refers to condition where water is supplied in the ring, and the water is allowed to drop with time. The operator records how much water goes into the soil for a given time period. The rate of which water goes into the soil is related to the soil's hydraulic conductivity. Double ring infiltrometer requires two rings: an inner and outer ring. The purpose is to create a one dimensional flow of water from the inner ring, as the analysis of data is simplified. If water is flowing in one-dimension at steady state condition, and a unit gradient is present in the underlying soil, the infiltration rate is approximately equal to the saturated hydraulic conductivity. An inner ring is driven into the ground, and a second bigger ring around that to help control the flow of water through the first ring. Water is supplied either with a constant or falling head condition, and the operator records how much water infiltrates from the inner ring into the soil over a given time period.

— Freebase

Ring network

Ring network

A ring network is a network topology in which each node connects to exactly two other nodes, forming a single continuous pathway for signals through each node - a ring. Data travel from node to node, with each node along the way handling every packet. Because a ring topology provides only one pathway between any two nodes, ring networks may be disrupted by the failure of a single link. A node failure or cable break might isolate every node attached to the ring. In response, some ring networks add a "counter-rotating ring" to form a redundant topology: in the event of a break, data are wrapped back onto the complementary ring before reaching the end of the cable, maintaining a path to every node along the resulting C-Ring. Such "dual ring" networks include Spatial Reuse Protocol, Fiber Distributed Data Interface, and Resilient Packet Ring. 802.5 networks - also known as IBM token ring networks - avoid the weakness of a ring topology altogether: they actually use a star topology at the physical layer and a media access unit to imitate a ring at the datalink layer.

— Freebase

Smoke

Smoke

Smoke is a collection of airborne solid and liquid particulates and gases emitted when a material undergoes combustion or pyrolysis, together with the quantity of air that is entrained or otherwise mixed into the mass. It is commonly an unwanted by-product of fires, but may also be used for pest control, communication, defensive and offensive capabilities in the military, cooking, or smoking. Smoke is used in rituals, when incense, sage, or resin is burned to produce a smell for spiritual purposes. Smoke is sometimes used as a flavoring agent, and preservative for various foodstuffs. Smoke is also a component of internal combustion engine exhaust gas, particularly diesel exhaust. Smoke inhalation is the primary cause of death in victims of indoor fires. The smoke kills by a combination of thermal damage, poisoning and pulmonary irritation caused by carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide and other combustion products. Smoke particles are an aerosol of solid particles and liquid droplets that are close to the ideal range of sizes for Mie scattering of visible light. This effect has been likened to three-dimensional textured privacy glass — a smoke cloud does not obstruct an image, but thoroughly scrambles it.

— Freebase

Magic smoke

Magic smoke

Magic smoke is a very strong, caustic smoke that smells of burning plastic. It is produced by overheating electronic circuits or components. The smoke often contains specks of sticky black ash that quickly fill a room. The color of the smoke depends on which component is overheating. The name "Magic Smoke" is a running in-joke that started among electrical engineers and technicians. It was more recently adopted by computer programmers. Bluish-gray smoke is released when black plastic epoxy material used to package semiconductor devices such as transistors and integrated circuits get burnt. The joke's humor operates via the logical consistency of what is observed, versus knowledge of what is actually occurring. The device was operating until the smoke was released from it, at which point the device ceases to operate. Ergo: the smoke is an essential part of the device's operation, through undetermined means.

— Freebase

Smoke grenade

Smoke grenade

Smoke grenades are canister-type grenades used as ground-to-ground or ground-to-air signaling devices, target or landing zone marking devices, or as screening devices for unit movements. Smoke grenades are normally considered non-lethal, although incorrect use may cause death. The body consists of a sheet steel cylinder with a four emission holes on top and one on the bottom to allow smoke release when the grenade is ignited. The filler consists of 250 to 350 grams of colored smoke composition. The reaction is exothermic and grenade casings will often remain scalding hot for some time even after the grenade is no longer emitting smoke. Another type of smoke grenade is the bursting variation. These are filled with white phosphorus, which is spread by explosive action. White phosphorus catches fire in the presence of air, and burns with a brilliant yellow flame, while producing copious amounts of white smoke. These double as incendiary grenades, and a variant of these are also launched from infantry-portable or armored fighting vehicle-mounted grenade launchers. Users must also be wary of wind direction when using smoke grenades.

— Freebase

Ring road

Ring road

A ring road, orbital motorway, beltway, circumferential highway, or loop highway is a road that encircles a town or city. The name "ring road" is used for the majority of metropolitan circumferential routes in the European Union, such as the Berliner Ring, the Brussels Ring, the Amsterdam Ring, the Boulevard Périphérique around Paris and the Leeds Inner and Outer ring roads. Australia and India also use the term ring road, as in Melbourne's Western Ring Road and Hyderabad's Outer Ring Road. In Europe, some ring roads, particularly those of motorway standard which are longer in length, are often known as "orbital motorways". Examples include the London Orbital, Rome Orbital, Manchester Orbital and the Madrid Orbital. In the United States, many ring roads are called beltways or loops, such as the Capital Beltway around Washington, D.C. Some ring roads, such as the Washington's Capital Beltway, use "Inner Loop" and "Outer Loop" terminology for directions of travel, since cardinal directions cannot be signed uniformly around the entire loop. The term 'ring road' is occasionally - and inaccurately - used interchangeably with the term 'Bypass'.

— Freebase

D-ring

D-ring

A D-ring is an item of hardware, usually a tie-down metal ring shaped like the letter D used primarily as a lashing point. The term is found interchangeably spelled in different forms, such as: Dring, d-ring or Dee-ring. A D-ring may be used at the end of a leather or fabric strap, or may be secured to a surface with a metal or fabric strap; though there are D-rings with a middle body designed to be welded to steel. Ideally, a D-ring swings freely after it has been secured. D-rings may vary in composition, geometry, weight, finish and load (rated) capacity. Though there are differences, a weld-on pivoting link is commonly called a D-ring. To minimize obstruction when the D-ring is not in use, recessed tie-down rings are designed that accommodate the D-ring so it is flush to the surface. There are some non-recessed designs that have an adhesive base. The corresponding work load limits (WLL) must not be exceeded.

— Wikipedia

Free, no signup required:

Add to Chrome

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

Free, no signup required:

Add to Firefox

Get instant synonyms for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!