Synonyms containing soap plant

We've found 12,191 synonyms:

Soap

Soap

sōp, n. a compound of oils or fats with soda (hard soaps) or potash (soft soaps), used in washing: (slang) soft words, flattery: (U.S. slang) money used for bribery and other secret political purposes.—v.t. to rub or wash with soap: to flatter.—ns. Soap′-ball, soap made into a ball, often with starch, as an emollient; Soap′berry, the fruit of several species of trees belonging to the genus Sapindus, containing a pulp useful as a substitute for soap in washing; Soap′-boil′er, one whose occupation is to make soap; Soap′-boil′ing, the occupation of making soap; Soap′-bub′ble, a bubble made from soap-suds by blowing through a pipe; Soap′iness; Soap′-lock, a lock of hair brushed apart from the rest: a rowdy; Soap′-pan, a large tank for boiling the ingredients in soap-making; Soap′-plant, a plant the bulb of which makes a thick lather when rubbed on clothes, and is used as soap; Soap′-stone, a soft kind of magnesian rock having a soapy feel, also called Steatite; Soap′-suds (s. and pl.), soapy water, esp. when worked into a foam; Soap′-test, a test for determining the degree of hardness of water; Soap′-works, a place where soap is made; Soap′wort, a genus of plants, some of the species of which have very beautiful flowers, and the root and leaves of which contain saponin, and hence are sometimes used in washing.—adj. Soap′y, like soap: having the qualities of soap: covered with soap: flattering, or pertaining to flattery. [A.S. sápe; Dut. zeep, Ger. seife.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Plant

Plant

plant, n. a something living and growing, fixed on the ground and drawing food therefrom by means of its root, and developing into a stem, leaves, and seed: a sprout: any vegetable production: the tools or material of any trade or business: (slang) a trick, dodge, hidden plunder.—v.t. to put into the ground for growth: to furnish with plants: to set in the mind, implant: to establish.—v.i. to set shoots in the ground.—adj. Plant′able.—ns. Plant′age (Shak.), plants in general, or the vegetable kingdom; Plantā′tion, a place planted: a wood or grove: (U.S.) a large estate: a colony: act or process of introduction: (Milt.) the act of planting; Plant′er, one who plants or introduces: the owner of a plantation; Plant′-house, a garden structure designed for the protection and cultivation of the plants of warmer climates than our own; Plant′icle, a young plant; Plant′ing, the act of setting in the ground for growth: the art of forming plantations of trees: a plantation.—adj. Plant′less, destitute of vegetation.—ns. Plant′let, a little plant; Plant′-louse, a small homopterous insect which infests plants; Plant′ule, the embryo of a plant. [A.S. plante (Fr. plante)—L. planta, a shoot, a plant.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hollyoaks

Hollyoaks

Hollyoaks is a British soap opera, first broadcast on Channel 4 on 23 October 1995. It was originally devised by Phil Redmond, who had previously conceived the Channel 4 soap Brookside. The programme is set in a fictional suburb of Chester called Hollyoaks, and features a large cast of characters, primarily 16-35 year-olds. The soap is targeted towards the younger audience, and is mostly filmed and produced in Childwall, Liverpool, although nearby locations are sometimes used. Beginning with a cast of seven major characters in 1995, the serial has approximately 65 main cast members today. Hollyoaks has a high cast turnover in comparison with other British soaps; as of December 2017 nineteen characters have spent five years or longer on the show. The programme has won 35 British Soap Awards, 18 Inside Soap Awards, one TRIC Award and one National Television Award; at the 2014 British Soap Awards, Hollyoaks won Best British Soap for the first time, breaking the 15-year draw between rival soaps EastEnders and Coronation Street. It is also popular around the world. The longest-serving cast member is Nick Pickard, who has played Tony Hutchinson since the first episode in 1995; all the other original cast members left by 2008. Other long-running characters include Cindy Cunningham, Mandy Richardson, Jack Osborne and Darren Osborne.

— Wikipedia

EastEnders

EastEnders

EastEnders is a British soap opera created by Julia Smith and Tony Holland which has been broadcast on BBC One since 1985. Set in Albert Square in the East End of London in the fictional Borough of Walford, the programme follows the stories of local residents and their families as they go about their daily lives. Initially there were two 30-minute episodes per week but since 2001 episodes have been broadcast every weekday apart from Wednesdays. Within eight months of the show's launch, it reached the number-one spot in BARB's TV ratings and has consistently remained among the top-rated TV programmes in Britain. In 2013, the average audience share for an episode was around 30 per cent. Today, EastEnders remains a significant programme in terms of the BBC's success and audience share, and also in the history of British television drama, tackling many dilemmas that are considered to be controversial and taboo issues in British culture and social life previously unseen on United Kingdom mainstream television.As of May 2016, EastEnders has won nine BAFTA Awards and the Inside Soap Award for Best Soap for 14 years running (from 1997 to 2012), as well as twelve National Television Awards for Most Popular Serial Drama and 11 awards for Best Soap at the British Soap Awards. It has also won 13 TV Quick and TV Choice Awards for Best Soap, six TRIC Awards for Soap of The Year, four Royal Television Society Awards for Best Continuing Drama and has been inducted into the Rose d'Or Hall of Fame.

— Wikipedia

Glycerin soap

Glycerin soap

Glycerin soaps are soaps that contain glycerin, a component of fat or oil. The soap is recognizably different from other soaps because it is translucent. The clarity of the soap is due to the particular alignment of the soap molecules in this type of soap, which can be induced through the addition of alcohol and sugar. This is usually done for homemade glycerin soaps which are not remeltable. The process for making glycerin soaps was well known as of 1857 in the Western world. In modern industrial soap-making, the glycerin is then usually separated from the soap to be resold and used in a wide variety of areas such as for personal care products, pharmaceuticals, chemical intermediates, and food processing.

— Freebase

soap

soap

Small chunks of soap, cut up to look like crack cocaine. Made in order to sell to unknowing victims for large profits, with little initial investment. I'm that nigga that sold coke, the nigga that sold dope, the nigga that shot dice, went broke, then sold soap. -- 50 Cent (Life's on the Line) Fu**in over fiends, laughin in they face, sellin soap to niggas, could die any day. -- Spice One (Face of a Desperate Man) "Sold dope, sold crack, sold soap, sold rap" -- Jay-Z (Think It's a Game) by Beanie Sigel Back in the days when coke was 20 a gram, I was the nigga selling soap for 50 a gram -- Poet in (Straight Outta Q.B.) by QB Finest

— Rap Dictionary

Botany

Botany

Botany, plant science, or plant biology, is a discipline of biology and the science of plant life. Traditionally, the science of botany included the study of fungi, algae, and viruses, but this has become less common. A person engaged in the study of botany is called a botanist. Botany began with early efforts to identify edible, medicinal and poisonous plants, making it one of the oldest branches of science. Nowadays, botanists study about 400,000 species of living organisms. The beginnings of modern-style classification systems can be traced to the 1500s–1600s when several attempts were made to classify plants scientifically. In the 19th and 20th centuries, major new techniques were developed for studying plants, including microscopy and analysis of plant chemistry and plant anatomy. In the last two decades of the 20th century, analysis of DNA sequences began to be used to classify plants more accurately, culminating in the APG III system, a molecular system of plant taxonomy that was published in 2009 by the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group. Modern botanical research covers very diverse topics and is increasingly multidisciplinary, integrating strongly with other scientific disciplines such as chemistry, physics and bioinformatics. It includes, for example, the study of paleobotany, plant evolution and speciation, plant diversity, plant ecology, plant anatomy, plant cell biology, cell signaling, plant biochemistry, plant physiology, plant taxonomy and plant systematics, molecular genetics, genomics, proteomics, epigenetics, evolutionary developmental biology, systems biology, plant tissue culture and biotechnology. Scientific disciplines in applied plant science include agronomy, forestry and horticulture, all of which owe much to the discipline of soil science. Key scientists in the history of botany include Theophrastus, Ibn al-Baitar, Carl Linnaeus, Gregor Mendel, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, William Hooker, Albert Francis Blakeslee, G. Ledyard Stebbins, Arthur Cronquist, Robert Brown, Arthur Tansley and many of those plant explorers whose names are immortalized in the generic or specific names of plants, such as Joseph Banks, John Tradescant the elder, John Tradescant the younger, Joel Roberts Poinsett and George Forrest.

— Freebase

Soaper

Soaper

A soaper is a person who practices soap making. It is the origin of the surnames "Soper", "Soaper", and "Saboni" (Arabic for soap maker). Roads named "Sopers Lane," "Soper Street," and so forth often were centres for soap making. Historically in England and in the United States a chandler is a person in the soap and/or candle trade.Craft-scale soap making has a variety of adherents, both those who practice it as a hobby and to keep traditional soap making methods alive, and consumers who prefer traditional handmade products as alternatives to mass-produced industrial offerings and as a contribution to a more sustainable means of living. A "soaper" is also slang for Quaaludes.

— Wikipedia

SOAP note

SOAP note

The SOAP note (an acronym for subjective, objective, assessment, and plan) is a method of documentation employed by healthcare providers to write out notes in a patient's chart, along with other common formats, such as the admission note. Documenting patient encounters in the medical record is an integral part of practice workflow starting with appointment scheduling, patient check-in and exam, documentation of notes, check-out, rescheduling, and medical billing. Additionally, it serves as a general cognitive framework for physicians to follow as they assess their patients.The SOAP note originated from the problem-oriented medical record (POMR), developed nearly 50 years ago by Lawrence Weed, MD. It was initially developed for physicians to allow them to approach complex patients with multiple problems in a highly organized way. Today, it is widely adopted as a communication tool between inter-disciplinary healthcare providers as a way to document a patient's progress.SOAP notes are commonly found in electronic medical records (EMR) and are used by providers of various backgrounds. Generally, SOAP notes are used as a template to guide the information that physicians add to a patient's EMR. Prehospital care providers such as emergency medical technicians may use the same format to communicate patient information to emergency department clinicians. Due to its clear objectives, the SOAP note provides physicians a way to standardize the organization of a patient's information to reduce confusion when patients are seen by various members of healthcare professionals. Many healthcare providers, ranging from physicians to behavioral healthcare professionals to veterinarians, use the SOAP note format for their patient's initial visit and to monitor progress during follow-up care.

— Wikipedia

Oxydol

Oxydol

Oxydol is the name of a laundry detergent sold in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. It was created in 1914 by Thomas Hedley Co. of Newcastle upon Tyne and purchased by Procter & Gamble in 1927. It was P&G's first laundry soap. In the 1930s, Oxydol was the sponsor of the Ma Perkins radio show, considered the first soap opera; as such, Oxydol sponsorship put the "soap" in "soap opera". In the mid-1950s, the soap was suffering declining sales, due in large part to P&G's introduction of its popular detergent, Tide. As a result, the soap formula was discontinued, and Oxydol was transformed into a detergent product, with color safe bleach. In detergent form, Oxydol was one of P&G's best sellers for years until, ironically, in the late 1980s P&G introduced Tide with Bleach, which cut into the sales of Oxydol. P&G sold the brand in 2000 to Redox Brands, a marketing company founded by former Procter & Gamble employees. Redox Brands was merged into CR Brands in 2006.In 2019, the brand was sold to Fab+Kind, which also owns the former US Phoenix Brands detergents.

— Wikipedia

Cleanser

Cleanser

A cleanser is a product used to cleanse something, such as a detergent or industrial cleaning agent. A popular type of cleanser is a facial care product that is used to remove make-up, dead skin cells, oil, dirt, and other types of pollutants from the skin of the face. This helps to unclog pores and prevent skin conditions such as acne. Many people use a cleanser once or more times a day as part of their skin care regimen together with a toner and moisturizer. Using a cleanser to remove dirt is considered to be a better alternative to bar soap or another form of skin cleanser not specifically formulated for the face for the following reasons: ⁕Bar soap has a high pH, and the skin's surface pH is on average 4.7. This means that soap can change the balance present in the skin to favor the overgrowth of some types of bacteria, increasing acne. ⁕Bar cleansers in general, soap or not, have thickeners that allow them to assume a bar shape can clog pores, leading to acne. ⁕Using bar soap on the face can remove natural oils from the skin that form a barrier against water loss. This causes the sebaceous glands to subsequently overproduce oil, a condition known as reactive seborrhoea, which will lead to clogged pores. In order to prevent drying out the skin, many cleansers incorporate moisturizers.

— Freebase

Softsoap

Softsoap

Softsoap is the trade name of Colgate-Palmolive's liquid hand soap and body wash. William Sheppard of New York was granted patent number 49,561 for his "Improved Liquid Soap" on August 22, 1865, for his discovery that a small amount of conventional soap could be mixed with large amounts of spirits of ammonia to create a soap with a consistency of molasses. His invention became common in public areas, but could generally not be found in homes. In 1980, entrepreneur Robert R. Taylor began selling his product as Softsoap through his company, Minnetonka Corp. in Chaska, Minnesota. Taylor knew others would copy the soap-in-a-pump-bottle idea, so he shrewdly purchased 100 million small bottle hand-pumps from the only two U.S. manufacturers that made them, so that any competitors wouldn't be able to buy any for one year - enough time for him to establish the brand name. It worked; in six months, he sold $25 million worth of Softsoap. The package made it very easy to spot on store shelves when nearly all other soaps were in bar form. Taylor sold the Softsoap brand to Colgate-Palmolive in 1987.

— Freebase

Castile soap

Castile soap

a kind of fine, hard, white or mottled soap, made with olive oil and soda; also, a soap made in imitation of the above-described soap

— Webster Dictionary

Saponaceous

Saponaceous

sap-o-nā′shus, adj. soapy: soap-like.—n. Sapōnā′ria, a genus of polypetalous plants, including the soapwort.—adj. Sapon′ifīable.—n. Saponificā′tion, the act or operation of converting into soap.—v.t. Sapon′ify, to convert into soap:—pr.p. sapon′ifying; pa.p. sapon′ified.n. Sap′onin, a vegetable principle, the solution of which froths when shaken, obtained from soapwort, &c. [L. sapo, saponis, soap.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Wellard

Wellard

Wellard is a fictional Belgian Tervuren dog from the BBC soap opera EastEnders. He first appeared in the series on 18 October 1994, and became EastEnders' longest-serving pet, before being killed off on 15 August 2008. Although the character is male, he has been played primarily by three female dogs: Zenna, her daughter Chancer, and her granddaughter Kyte. A fourth dog briefly served as a replacement for Zenna in 1996, when she was given time off from the show to have a litter of puppies. Wellard was briefly written out of the series under executive producer Matthew Robinson, but returned when Robinson was succeeded by John Yorke. Wellard's owners for the majority of his duration in the soap were Robbie Jackson and Gus Smith. He was voted "Best Pet" at the 2008 Digital Spy Soap Awards, and named the UK's favourite soap opera pet in a 2009 Inside Soap poll. Wellard was a fan favourite, and although a storyline that saw him threatened with euthanasia for biting local café owner Ian Beale was poorly received by critics, his death drew generally favourable reviews.

— Wikipedia

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Quiz

Are you a human thesaurus?

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Which of the following words is not a synonym of the others?
  • A. heavy
  • B. floaty
  • C. perky
  • D. chirpy